COVID-19 cases up 16% this week; vaccinations down 54% — 11 CDC findings


COVID-19 tracker: Pfizer, Moderna vaccines sharply cut hospitalizations in  older adults, CDC data show | FiercePharma

COVID-19 cases continue to tick up in the U.S. as the highly transmissible delta variant spreads and vaccination rates slow, according to the CDC’s COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review published July 9.

Eleven statistics to know:

Reported cases

1. The nation’s current seven-day case average is 14,885, a 16 percent increase from the previous week’s average.

2. The seven-day case average is down 94.1 percent from the pandemic’s peak seven-day average of 251,897 on Jan. 10.

Vaccinations

3. The U.S. had administered more than 332.3 million total vaccine doses as of July 8.

4. About 183.2 million people have received at least one dose — representing 55.2 percent of the total U.S. population — and more than 158.3 million people have gotten both doses, about 47.7 percent of the population.

5. The seven-day average number of vaccines administered daily was 239,497 as of July 8, a 54.5 percent decrease from the previous week.

Testing

6. The seven-day average for percent positivity from tests is 2.7 percent, up 31.9 percent from the previous week.  

7. The nation’s seven-day average test volume for the week of June 25 to July 1 was 558,867, down 7.9 percent from the prior week’s average.  

New hospital admissions 

8. The current seven-day hospitalization average for June 29 to July 5 is 2,037, an 8.6 percent increase from the previous week’s average.

Variants

9. Based on an analysis of specimens collected in the two weeks ending July 3, the CDC estimates the delta variant, or B.1.617.2, accounts for 51.7 percent of all U.S. COVID-19 cases.

10. The alpha variant, also known as B.1.1.7, is estimated to account for 28.7percent of all cases, and the gamma variant, also known as P.1, comprises about 8.9 percent of all cases.

Deaths 

11. The current seven-day death average is 154, down 25.2 percent from the previous week’s average. Some historical deaths have been excluded from these counts, the CDC said.

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