Conflicts of interest in health care journalism: VIDEO with our publisher about “an unhealthy state of things” (Part 3 of 3)

https://www.healthnewsreview.org/2017/06/conflict-of-interest-in-health-care-journalism-video-with-our-publisher-part-3-of-3/

In the past two days, we’ve outlined a number of concerns about news organizations, professional journalism organizations and academic institutions that are involved in health care journalism reporting or training while accepting sponsorship or funding from health care industry entities that are often subjects of what the journalists or trainees do or will write about. (Part one of series. Part two.) These practices may be good for corporate, organizational or academic institution coffers, but the sponsorship comes at a price – of potential damage to journalism’s integrity and to the public trust in journalism, news reports and news organizations.

We have touched on examples of our concerns involving:

  • The World Conference of Science Journalists
  • The Association of Health Care Journalists
  • The University of Colorado
  • The University of Kansas
  • The National Press Foundation
  • NPR, STAT, Vox.com

Ben Bagdikian, journalist/educator/media critic, wrote to and about journalists:

“Never forget that your obligation is to the people. It is not, at heart, to those who pay you, or to your editor, or to your sources, or to your friends, or to the advancement of your career. It is to the public.”

In this final part of our three-part series, I talk about some of these issues in more depth, and from the perspective of my growing concerns over a 44-year career in health care journalism.

Conflicts of interest: Time for world’s top health journalism organization to reconsider fundraising practices. Part 2 of 3

https://www.healthnewsreview.org/2017/06/conflicts-interest-time-worlds-top-health-journalism-organization-reconsider-fundraising-practices-part-2-3/

Perhaps few journalism organizations have tried harder to minimize conflicts of interest than the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ), the leading professional organization for journalists who report on health care.

The two of us know AHCJ well, having been members almost since its launch 20 years ago. We’ve both served on AHCJ’s board, attended most of its 18 annual conferences, and served on many panels as speakers or moderators over the years. Gary wrote the AHCJ’s Statement of Principles, which was adopted by the Board in 2004.

AHCJ states that its educational arm, the Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, won’t take money from pharmaceutical companies, device makers, insurers or even most advocacy groups such as the American Cancer Society. That strict standard distinguishes AHCJ from some other journalism training organizations, which have no qualms about accepting money from companies that journalists routinely report on.

In fact, when AHCJ agreed to collaborate with the World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ), which meets in San Francisco this fall, it raised its own money for a health care track “because the broader funding of the conference includes funders that we would not take money from,” AHCJ Executive Director Len Bruzzese told us. As noted in part one of this series, WCSJ accepted $400,000 in support from drug company Johnson & Johnson and another $50,000 from drug company Bayer. Each of the funders that AHCJ lists for its track at WCSJ is a philanthropic foundation. Bruzzese added: “There is easier money out there if you’re willing to take it from other organizations that may want to have more influence than we believe they should have on journalists.”

Conflicts of interest in health care journalism. Who’s watching the watchdogs? We are. Part 1 of 3

https://www.healthnewsreview.org/2017/06/conflicts-of-interest-in-health-care-journalism-1-of-3/

Ben Harder, a journalist with US News & World Report, recently tweeted, “Pharma ads subsidize many health reporters’ salaries.”

Elisabeth Rosenthal, who now heads Kaiser Health News after a long career with the New York Times, tweeted in that same discussion, “Many of my articles in the NYT carried pop-up ads for pharma. Infuriating.”

Many journalists are aware of the drug industry’s attempts to gain positive attention by buying placement within the nation’s health care news.  A few occasionally write or talk about it, as Harder and Rosenthal did publicly.

But I don’t think we talk often enough about why it matters if health care industry entities are allowed to advertise within, or sponsor, health care journalism content.  Americans spend more than $3 trillion on health care. Conflicts of interest in health care and research are rampant. The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) last month published a special edition all about health care conflicts of interest.  JAMA included a Viewpoint article entitled, “Conflict of Interest:  Why Does it Matter?”  The first line:  “Preservation of trust is the essential purpose of policies about conflict of interest.”

But who talks about conflicts of interest in health care journalism? In a Gallup poll, “Honesty/Ethics in Professions,” respondents rated journalists’ honesty and ethical standards below psychiatrists, chiropractors and bankers….and just above lawyers.

There is great potential harm in a further erosion of trust in journalism and in health care.  There is a great potential harm in journalists – and the audience they serve – becoming numb to the presence of and influence of drug companies and other industry entities in the news and information disseminated to the public.  There is, as we have begun to point out repeatedly in our review of news stories and PR news releases, advertising and marketing messages, often a polluted stream of contaminated information reaching the public.  Often vested interests pollute that stream.  (We will discuss these potential harms in more detail in part 3 of this series.)

That’s why I think that this issue demands and deserves a deeper dive. Why now?  Because, as outlined in this series, there are a growing number of questionable alliances between a growing number of news organizations and health care industry sponsors. Money is exchanging hands and I ask “Why? Why do news organizations enter into these arrangements?  Why do they feel they need to?  Have they exhausted all other options?”  I want to shine a light on a collection of news organization practices.  I’m raising the same types of questions that journalists often raise as they report on various issues.  But I’m asking them because I don’t see enough journalists talking about it when their own organizations accept industry money.