Spin Belongs in The Gym, Not The Workplace

Spin Belongs in The Gym, Not The Workplace – 4 Ways to Increase Transparency

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I have a motto when it comes to honesty and transparency at work: Spin belongs in the gym, not the workplace.

Spinning the truth is a way of shaping our communications to make our self, the company, or the situation appear better than it is in reality. It’s become so commonplace in the corporate world that many times we don’t even realize we’re doing it. We “spin” by selectively sharing the facts, overemphasizing the positive, minimizing the negative, or avoiding the obvious, all in an attempt to manipulate the perception of others. See if a few of these spins on the truth sound familiar:

  • “We are optimizing and rightsizing our human capital.” (aka, We are eliminating jobs and laying off people.)
  • “Quarterly revenue was adversely affected by marketplace dynamics.” (aka, We failed to hit our revenue goal.)
  • “Brian’s strength as a salesperson is developing creative business deals and client partnerships, as opposed to the tactical elements of his role.” (aka, We can’t or don’t want to hold Brian accountable for his administrative responsibilities as a salesperson because he brings in too much revenue.)

Spinning the truth is one of the most common ways leaders bust trust. It also leads to tremendous inefficiencies because people are confused about roles, they duplicate work, balls get dropped, and people resort to blaming others. Poor morale, cynicism, and political infighting become the norm when honesty and transparency are disregarded.

There are macro-level societal events and trends driving the need for greater transparency in the workplace. We’re all familiar with the digital privacy concerns related to the pervasiveness of technology in our lives, and we’ve witnessed the corporate scandals of blatant deceit and dishonesty that’s contributed to record low levels of trust. The global meltdown of trust in business, government, and other institutions over the last several years has generated cries for more transparency in communications, legislation, and governance. Oddly enough, research has shown that in our attempts to be more transparent, we may actually be suffering an illusion of transparency—the belief that people are perceiving and understanding our motivations, intents, and communications more than they actually are.

But at the individual, team, and organization levels, what can we do to build greater trust, honesty, and transparency? I have four suggestions:

  1. Provide access to information. In the absence of information, people will make up their own version of the truth. This leads to gossip, rumors, and misinformation which results in people questioning leadership decisions and losing focus on the mission at hand. Leaders who share information about themselves and the organization build trust and credibility with their followers. When people are entrusted with all the necessary information to make intelligent business decisions, they are compelled to act responsibly and a culture of accountability can be maintained.
  2. Speak plainly. Avoid double-speak, and reduce or eliminate the use of euphemisms such as right-sizing, optimizing, gaining efficiencies, or other corporate buzzwords. When people hear these words, their BS detectors are automatically activated. They immediately start to parse and interpret your words to decipher what you really mean. Speak plainly in ways that are easily understood. Present complicated data in layman terms and focus on having a dialogue with people, not bombarding them with facts. Our team members are big boys and girls, they can handle the truth. Be a straight-shooter, using healthy doses of compassion and empathy when delivering tough news.
  3. Share criteria for making decisions. When it comes to making tough decisions, I believe that if people know what I know, and understand what I understand, they will be far more likely to reach the same (or similar) conclusion I did. Even if they don’t, they will usually acknowledge the validity of my decision-making criteria and respect that I approached the process with a clear and focused direction. Unfortunately, many times leaders are afraid to share information or their decision-making criteria because they don’t want to be second-guessed or exposed to legal risk. We’ve become so afraid of being sued or publicly criticized that we tend to only share information on a “need to know” basis. Sharing information on your decision-making process will help people buy into your plans rather than second-guessing them.
  4. Create communication forums. A lack of communication is often the root of dysfunction in organizations. The left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing and no one seems to take ownership of making sure people are informed. Everyone likes to blame the Corporate Communications department for the lack of information sharing in the organization, but that blame is misplaced. Let me tell you who has the big “R” (responsibility) for communication—YOU! If you’re a leader, it’s your responsibility to create forums to share information with your team. Ultimately, this starts at the top. A President or CEO cannot delegate communications to some other function. It’s the top dog’s responsibility to ensure alignment all throughout the organization and the only way that starts is to frequently and openly communicate. The forums for communication are only limited by your imagination: town hall meetings, email updates, newsletters, video messages, department meetings, lunch gatherings, and team off-site events are just a few examples.

Spin is a great activity for the gym and it keeps you in fantastic shape. However, in the workplace, spin is deadly to your health as a leader. It leads to low trust, poor morale, and cynicism in your team. Keep spin in the gym and out of the workplace.

 

 

 

25 Inspiring Quotes From Mahatma Gandhi

http://www.ravipratapsingh.com/2017/10/inspiring-quotes-from-mahatma-gandhi.html

Mahatma Gandhi Quotes_Ravi Pratap Singh_Learnnovators

Today, the 2nd of October, is celebrated as Gandhi Jayanti in India to mark the occasion of the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi.

Like millions of people around the globe, I too have derived tremendous inspiration from Gandhi’s life and teachings. It’s a measure of the man’s greatness and foresightedness that nearly seven decades after his death, his words are even more relevant today than they were back then. If only we pay more heed to the Mahatma’s words, the world would be a far more peaceful and compassionate place to live in.

On this special day, I thought it would be a great idea to share 25 of my most favourite Gandhi quotes with you… hope you find them as inspirational as I do!

1. “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.

2. “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.

3. “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.

4. “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.

5. “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.

6. “An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

7. “Whatever you do will be insignificant. But it is very important that you do it.

8. “Nobody can hurt you without your permission.

9. “Our greatness lies not so much in being able to remake the world but being able to remake ourselves.

10. “What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror refection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.

11. “Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.

12. “In a gentle way, you can shake the world.

13. “There is a sufficiency in the world for man’s need but not for man’s greed.

14. “You can chain me, you can torture me, you can even destroy my body, but you will never imprison my mind.

15. “Man becomes great exactly in the degree in which he works for the welfare of his fellow-men.

16. “Even if you are a minority of one, the truth is the truth.

17. “An unjust law is itself a species of violence. Arrest for its breach is more so.

18. “The future depends on what you do today.

19. “No culture can live if it attempts to be exclusive.

20. “It is my conviction that nothing enduring can be built on violence.

21. “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propogation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it.

22. “My religion is based on truth and non-violence. Truth is my God. Non-violence is the means of realising Him.

23. “In matters of conscience, the law of the majority has no place.

24. “Non-cooperation with evil is as much a duty as is cooperation with good.

25. “I am prepared to die, but there is no cause for which I am prepared to kill.

And finally, one bonus quote from the great man which embodies everything he stood for…

26. “My life is my message.

What do you do when you know someone is going to die?

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2017/04/know-someone-going-die.html?utm_content=bufferee305&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

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What do you do when you know someone is going to die? I’m not talking about death when it comes at the end of a long protracted illness or a terminal diagnosis. Or the final act at the end of a “good” life, when the body and mind have ultimately given way. I’m talking about when you realize the twenty-five-year-old woman in front of you, who you met five minutes ago, has no idea she will not survive to see another sunrise.

Moonlighting during residency in the ICU of a community hospital, I was summoned to the ED to evaluate a feverish, septic young woman. In his book, Blink, Malcolm Gladwell describes the gut/reflexive first impression we make before our “thinking” brain starts getting in the way of those initial thoughts. Walking into the ER bay, all the warning bells were ringing. The mottling of her skin told me she was in shock. The visible, rapid rise and fall of her chest told me she was working hard to compensate for an acidosis. Her eyes told me she was afraid, and rightfully so. The rapid pulse and low blood pressure were punctuated by red on the monitor up in the corner of the room. She looked sick, but the reality was much worse. I had known her now all of ten seconds. But I didn’t know she was dead. Not just yet.

 

Why Expertise Matters

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2017/04/07/522992390/why-expertise-matters?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20170407

It's important for everyone to realize and acknowledge that there are experts who really do know more than the rest of us on certain topics, says Adam Frank.

I am an expert — a card-carrying, credential-bearing expert.

Of course, there are only a few hundred people on the planet who care about the thing I’m an expert on: the death of stars like the sun. But, nonetheless, if the death of stars like the sun is something you want to know about, I’m one of the folks to call. I tell you this not to brag or make my mom proud, but because expertise has been getting a bad rap lately. It’s worth a moment of our time to understand exactly why this “death of expertise” is happening — and what it means for the world.

The attack on expertise was given its most visceral form by British politician Michael Gove during the Brexit campaign last year when he famously claimed, “people in this country have had enough of experts.” The same kinds of issues, however, are also at stake here in the U.S. in our discussions about “alternative facts,” “fake news” and “denial” of various kinds. That issue can be put as a simple question: When does one opinion count more than another?

By definition, an expert is someone whose learning and experience lets them understand a subject deeper than you or I do (assuming we’re not an expert in that subject, too). The weird thing about having to write this essay at all is this: Who would have a problem with that? Doesn’t everyone want their brain surgery done by an expert surgeon rather than the guy who fixes their brakes? On the other hand, doesn’t everyone want their brakes fixed by an expert auto mechanic rather than a brain surgeon who has never fixed a flat?

But Nichols is profoundly troubled by the willful “know-nothing-ism” he sees around him. Its principle cause, he argues, are the new mechanisms that shape our discussions (i.e. the Internet and social media). He writes:

“There was once a time when participation in public debate, even in the pages of the local newspaper, required submission of a letter or an article, and that submission had to be written intelligently, pass editorial review, and stand with the author’s name attached… Now, anyone can bum rush the comments section of any major publication. Sometimes, that results in a free-for-all that spurs better thinking. Most of the time, however, it means that anyone can post anything they want, under any anonymous cover, and never have to defend their views or get called out for being wrong.”

Nichols also points to excesses of partisanship in politics, the weakening of expectations in schools and, finally, to human nature. The last cause, he says, is particularly troubling. As he puts it:

“Its called the Dunning-Kruger effect, which says, in sum, that the dumber you are, the more confident you are that you’re not actually dumb. And when you get invested in being aggressively dumb…well, the last thing you want to encounter are experts who disagree with you, and so you dismiss them in order to maintain your unreasonably high opinion of yourself.”

Part of the problem, says Nichols, is that while the democratization of knowledge is great, it’s threatened by the strange insistence that every opinion has equal weight. That’s an idea, he rightly says, that has nothing to do with democracy:

“Having equal rights does not mean having equal talents, equal abilities, or equal knowledge. It assuredly does not mean that ‘everyone’s opinion about anything is as good as anyone else’s.’ And yet, this is now enshrined as the credo of a fair number of people despite being obvious nonsense.”