16 Rules for Effective Decision-Making

https://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2019/04/16_rules_for_effective_decisio.html

16 Rules for Effective Decision-Making

WHERE WE GO in life is determined by the choices we make. How we make those decisions becomes critical. The speed of change, the abundance of choices, the unknown unknowns, and the impact of a connected world, all conspire to make decision-making a labyrinth. We face traps everywhere.

In Labyrinth: The Art of Decision-Making, Pawel Motyl examines “The most prevalent weak spots in decision-making processes, not only in business but in life in general; during crisis and calmer times; in both individual and group decisions.” 

I agree with Motyl that “We really do live in a world where everything is out of whack and everything we thought we knew is being called into question.” It calls for a deeper look at not just what we think, but more importantly how we think and a clear understanding of how we got there.

Motyl digs into the series of decisions that led to some of the modern world’s most dramatic events: from the Cuban missile crisis to the 1996 Mount Everest climbing disaster; from the Apollo 13 rescue mission to the ill-fated Daimler–Chrysler merger.

Using many and varied examples Motyl reveals 16 rules for effective decision-making. The rules with the accompanying narrative are well-researched and intriguing. Here is the overview: 

Rule #1
Prepare for a black swan (an unpleasant surprise or event that we cannot predict from prior experience), because one thing is certain: sooner or later you will meet one. Because of easy access to information and globalization, black swan events are on the rise.

Rule #2
The better it’s going, and the more successful you are, the more you are at risk of turkey syndrome. The deeper you fall into turkey syndrome, the nastier your black swan will be.

Rule #3
The more you admire someone, the more critically you should examine their opinions. The more exciting somebody’s vision seems, the more closely you should test its foundations in reality. This fundamental misunderstanding comes into play here: “a harmonious group = a tight group = an effective group”

Rule #4
The more everyone around insists something is impossible, the more you should check it yourself. Several times.

Rule #5
The greater the investment of time, effort, money, and our own reputation, the harder it is to objectively assess a situation and make the right decision. 

Rule #6
If you find yourself in a black swan situation, go into inquiry mode. Whatever your intuition or experience is telling you may be wrong. 

Rule #7
Set up your own Executive Committee. Surround yourself with people who don’t think like you. Value those who disagree with you, and who aren’t afraid to say it.

Rule #8
When improving and organization, also pay attention to the best and most efficient processes. In a black swan situation, they can fail. Do you have a backup plan?

Rule #9
Shoot down Concordes and hunt for monkey habits. Eliminating loss-making projects and bad practices frees up time for other things, increasing a company’s agility and flexibility.

Rule #10
Recognize the value of your failures (and those of others). Thoroughly analyze your past failures and draw in depth, objective, and actionable conclusions for the failure.

Rule #11
Never stop shaping the organizational culture. It can be your greatest ally, or your worst enemy, in making the right decisions.

Rule #12
Great leaders are distinguished by their awareness that greatness is no guarantee of infallibility.

Rule #13
Don’t be a “decision drunk”—use data for illumination, not only for support. Data can be a great ally, when properly analyzed.

Rule #14
Never ignore the values and convictions of other generations, especially those only just entering the market. Even if their influence on decision-making today is minimal, the new normal means this may change sooner than you expect.

Rule #15
The world of data overload is also a word of new possibilities. Actively seek out opportunities to engage a cost-free force that can radically improve the quality of your decision-making.

Rule #16
Encourage and create leaders around you. Dispersed leadership involves many people, which means there is less risk of a single person making a poor strategic choice.

 

 

 

WILLIS-KNIGHTON CEO CONTRACT EXTENDED DESPITE RETIREMENT PLANS, ‘COUP ATTEMPT’

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/strategy/willis-knighton-ceo-contract-extended-despite-retirement-plans-coup-attempt?utm_source=silverpop&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ENL_190410_LDR_BRIEFING%20(1)&spMailingID=15444335&spUserID=MTY3ODg4NTg1MzQ4S0&spJobID=1620658993&spReportId=MTYyMDY1ODk5MwS2

The board gave James K. Elrod two more years at the health system’s helm, despite the 81-year-old CEO’s retirement plans announced amid controversy.


KEY TAKEAWAYS

The longtime CEO signaled in 2017, after a push for his ouster, that his likely successor would be recruited to the health system so he could retire.

The board decided keeping the same leader in place for another two years would be ‘our greatest advantage’ in the midst of change.

Eighteen months have passed since the medical executive committee of Willis-Knighton Health System in Shreveport, Louisiana, urged the board to force President and CEO James K. Elrod to either step out of his longtime leadership position voluntarily or be pushed.

The committee’s statement of no confidence in a letter to the trustees complained that Elrod failed to tolerate dissent and hadn’t responded appropriately to changes in the healthcare industry, as the Shreveport Times reported, describing the incident as “an attempted coup.”

Elrod was 80 at the time. He had worked for the organization more than 50 years and turned what was an 80-bed hospital into what became Louisiana’s largest health system. He weathered the criticism with backing from the board. Then he signaled in a letter to hospital staff that a succession planning process for his likely successor was underway.

Despite the controversy, the board announced Friday that it asked Elrod, now 81, to stay at his post for another two years.

“After taking some time to consider our vote, Mr. Elrod graciously agreed to delay his retirement plans,” board president Frank Hughes, MD, said in a statement describing Elrod as “our greatest advantage” in the face of uncertainty and change.

“This is a clear indication of his ongoing dedication and commitment to Willis-Knighton, and we are grateful for this decision,” Hughes added. “While we are pleased with the current senior leadership team assembled during the past 18 months, we felt that the greatest gift we could give them is additional time for mentoring and guidance. We made this decision in support of our physicians, our employees and the larger community.”

“WHILE WE ARE PLEASED WITH THE CURRENT SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM ASSEMBLED DURING THE PAST 18 MONTHS, WE FELT THAT THE GREATEST GIFT WE COULD GIVE THEM IS ADDITIONAL TIME FOR MENTORING AND GUIDANCE.”

 

 

 

 

Tenet eliminates poison pill, adopts governance changes

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/tenet-eliminates-poison-pill-adopts-governance-changes.html

Image result for poison pill

Dallas-based Tenet Healthcare announced March 5 that its board of directors has approved several changes to the company’s corporate governance.

Here are five things to know about the changes.

1. The board approved changes to Tenet’s bylaws that allow shareholders with a 25 percent stake in the company to request a special meeting. The move comes after the board approved amendments to the company’s bylaws in January that allowed majority shareholders to request special meetings.

2. Tenet approved a short-term shareholder rights plan in August 2017, which was designed to protect $1.7 billion in net operating loss carryforwards and ensure the board could protect all shareholder interests as it executed CEO and board changes. Under the poison pill, if any person or entity acquired 4.9 percent or more of Tenet stock, all holders of rights issued under the plan are entitled to acquire shares of common stock with a 50 percent discount.

3. Tenet terminated the poison pill March 5. “The board made this decision based upon the reduced value of the NOL shareholder rights plan following recent tax law changes and an increase in the company’s stock price since the NOL shareholder rights plan was adopted, as well as shareholder feedback,” Tenet said in a statement. The poison pill was originally slated to expire following Tenet’s 2018 annual meeting of stockholders, which is typically held in May.

4. Tenet announced March 5 that it also eliminated the executive committee as a standing committee of the company’s board of directors.

5. “The board of directors and management have spent considerable time in recent weeks engaging with shareholders representing a majority of our outstanding stock and we received constructive input regarding Tenet and our objective to lead with best corporate governance practices,” said Ronald A. Rittenmeyer, executive chairman and CEO of Tenet. “We believe the actions which we are taking today demonstrate our continued commitment to being responsive in a timely manner to shareholder feedback and to implementing measures that increase transparency and accountability.”