That ‘Living Will’ You Signed? At The ER, It Could Be Open To Interpretation.

That ‘Living Will’ You Signed? At The ER, It Could Be Open To Interpretation.

“Don’t resuscitate this patient; he has a living will,” the nurse told Dr. Monica Williams-Murphy, handing her a document.

Williams-Murphy looked at the sheet bearing the signature of the unconscious 78-year-old man, who’d been rushed from a nursing home to the emergency room. “Do everything possible,” it read, with a check approving cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

The nurse’s mistake was based on a misguided belief that living wills automatically include “do not resuscitate” (DNR) orders. Working quickly, Williams-Murphy revived the patient, who had a urinary tract infection and recovered after a few days in the hospital.

Unfortunately, misunderstandings involving documents meant to guide end-of-life decision-making are “surprisingly common,” said Williams-Murphy, medical director of advance-care planning and end-of-life education for Huntsville Hospital Health System in Alabama.

But health systems and state regulators don’t systematically track mix-ups of this kind, and they receive little attention amid the push to encourage older adults to document their end-of-life preferences, experts acknowledge. As a result, information about the potential for patient harm is scarce.

new report out of Pennsylvania, which has the nation’s most robust system for monitoring patient safety events, treats mix-ups involving end-of-life documents as medical errors — a novel approach. It found that in 2016, Pennsylvania health care facilities reported nearly 100 events relating to patients’ “code status” — their wish to be resuscitated or not, should their hearts stop beating and they stop breathing. In 29 cases, patients were resuscitated against their wishes. In two cases, patients weren’t resuscitated despite making it clear they wanted this to happen.

The rest of the cases were “near misses” — problems caught before they had a chance to cause permanent harm.

Most likely, this is an undercount, said Regina Hoffman, executive director of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, adding that she was unaware of similar data from any other state.

Asked to describe a near miss, Hoffman, co-author of the report, said: “Perhaps I’m a patient who’s come to the hospital for elective surgery and I have a DNR (do not resuscitate) order in my [medical] chart. After surgery, I develop a serious infection and a resident [physician] finds my DNR order. He assumes this means I’ve declined all kinds of treatment, until a colleague explains that this isn’t the case.”

The problem, Hoffman explained, is that doctors and nurses receive little, if any, training in understanding and interpreting living wills, DNR orders and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) forms, either on the job or in medical or nursing school.

Communication breakdowns and a pressure-cooker environment in emergency departments, where life-or-death decisions often have to be made within minutes, also contribute to misunderstandings, other experts said.

Research by Dr. Ferdinando Mirarchi, medical director of the department of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Hamot in Erie, Pa., suggests that the potential for confusion surrounding end-of-life documents is widespread. In various studies, he has asked medical providers how they would respond to hypothetical situations involving patients with critical and terminal illnesses.

In one study, for instance, he described a 46-year-old woman brought to the ER with a heart attack and suddenly goes into cardiac arrest. Although she’s otherwise healthy, she has a living will refusing all potentially lifesaving medical interventions. What would you do, he asked more than 700 physicians in an internet survey?

Only 43 percent of those doctors said they would intervene to save her life — a troubling figure, Mirarchi said. Since this patient didn’t have a terminal condition, her living will didn’t apply to the situation at hand and every physician should have been willing to offer aggressive treatment, he explained.

In another study, Mirarchi described a 70-year-old man with diabetes and cardiac disease who had a POLST form indicating he didn’t want cardiopulmonary resuscitation but agreeing to a limited set of other medical interventions, including defibrillation (shocking his heart with an electrical current). Yet 75 percent of 223 emergency physicians surveyed said they wouldn’t have pursued defibrillation if the patient had a cardiac arrest.

One issue here: Physicians assumed that defibrillation is part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. That’s a mistake: They’re separate interventions. Another issue: Physicians are often unsure what patients really want when one part of a POLST form says “do nothing” (declining CPR) and another part says “do something” (permitting other interventions).

Mirarchi’s work involves hypotheticals, not real-life situations. But it highlights significant practical confusion about end-of-life documents, said Dr. Scott Halpern, director of the Palliative and Advanced Illness Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine.

Attention to these problems is important, but shouldn’t be overblown, cautioned Dr. Arthur Derse, director of the center for bioethics and medical humanities at the Medical College of Wisconsin. “Are there errors of misunderstanding or miscommunication? Yes. But you’re more likely to have your wishes followed with one of these documents than without one,” he said.

Make sure you have ongoing discussions about your end-of-life preferences with your physician, surrogate decision-maker, if you have one, and family, especially when your health status changes, Derse advised. Without these conversations, documents can be difficult to interpret.

Here are some basics about end-of-life documents:

Living wills. A living will expresses your preferences for end-of-life care but is not a binding medical order. Instead, medical staff will interpret it based on the situation at hand, with input from your family and your surrogate decision-maker.

Living wills become activated only when a person is terminally ill and unconscious or in a permanent vegetative state. A terminal illness is one from which a person is not expected to recover, even with treatment — for instance, advanced metastatic cancer.

Bouts of illness that can be treated — such as an exacerbation of heart failure — are “critical” not “terminal” illness and should not activate a living will. To be activated, one or two physicians have to certify that your living will should go into effect, depending on the state where you live.

DNRs. Do-not-resuscitate orders are binding medical orders, signed by a physician. A DNR order applies specifically to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and directs medical personnel not to administer chest compressions, usually accompanied by mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, if someone stops breathing or their heart stops beating.

The section of a living will specifying that you don’t want CPR is a statement of a preference, not a DNR order.

A DNR order applies only to a person who has gone into cardiac arrest. It does not mean that this person has refused other types of medical assistance, such as mechanical ventilation, defibrillation following CPR, intubation (the insertion of a breathing tube down a patient’s throat), medical tests or intravenous antibiotics, among other measures.

Even so, DNR orders are often wrongly equated with “do not treat” at all, according to a 2011 review in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

POLST forms. A POLST form is a set of medical orders for a seriously ill or frail patient who could die within a year, signed by a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner.

These forms, which vary by state, are meant to be prepared after a detailed conversation about a patient’s prognosis, goals and values, and the potential benefits and harms of various treatment options.

Problems have emerged with POLST’s increased use. Some nursing homes are asking all patients to sign POLST forms, even those admitted for short-term rehabilitation or whose probable life expectancy exceeds a year, according to a recent article authored by Charlie Sabatino, director of the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging. Also, medical providers’ conversations with patients can be cursory, not comprehensive, and forms often aren’t updated when a patient’s medical condition changes, as recommended.

“The POLST form is still relatively new and there’s education that needs to be done,” said Amy Vandenbroucke, executive director of the National POLST Paradigm, an organization that promotes the use of POLST forms across the U.S. In a policy statement issued last year and updated in April, it stated that completion of POLST forms should always be voluntary, made with a patient’s or surrogate decision-maker’s knowledge and consent, and offered only to people whose physician would not be surprised if they die within a year.

 

7 AREAS CFOS MUST ADDRESS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL VIABILITY

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/finance/7-areas-cfos-must-address-organizational-viability?utm_source=silverpop&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20180613_HLM_SPOTLIGHT_Cost-Containment%20(1)&spMailingID=13684315&spUserID=MTY3ODg4NTg1MzQ4S0&spJobID=1421195534&spReportId=MTQyMTE5NTUzNAS2

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An upcoming CFO roundtable provides a peer-sharing platform to learn best practices for advancing a healthcare organization’s financial health.

Today’s healthcare financial leaders face escalating costs, quality improvement issues, difficult reimbursement environments, an increasingly complex service portfolio, and risk management associated with performance contracting.

Pressure mounts on CFOs to ensure their organizations remain viable as they deal with these issues, which makes gleaning proven strategies from colleagues imperative.

Four dozen executives will convene at a private roundtable forum during the 2018 HealthLeaders Media CFO Exchange, August 8–10 in Santa Barbara, California, to
address top-of-mind concerns.

In pre-event planning calls, Exchange participants—representing integrated health systems, academic medical centers, community hospitals, and safety net providers from across the U.S.—want to know how others are taking on risk, improving costs, addressing consumerism, and capturing additional reimbursement.

During the two-day event, a series of moderated roundtables will explore areas of special interest expressed by CFOs, including the following:

1. Cost improvement

Since costs are increasing at rates higher than reimbursement, how does a CFO drive cost performance to maintain sufficient operating margins? How are systems successfully leveraging scale to rationalize administrative and support services?

2. Proliferation of mergers and acquisitions

How can an independent organization survive in this environment? Should it consider other affiliations? For those involved in new entities, how are leaders achieving value?

3. Taking on risk

How does an organization prepare to take on and reduce risk, and when does an organization know that it is ready? How can CFOs build reserves to offset unexpected outlays?

4. Enhancing revenue cycle performance

How can financial leaders improve payer terms, reduce denials, ensure payer compliance, and improve clinical documentation? What are effective ways to deploy new workflow technologies in patient accounts?

5. Performance-based contracts

How are organizations engaging medical staff to reduce the cost of care and improve outcomes?

6. Medical group employment

How does a health system minimize provider subsidies for employed physicians and improve practice performance?

7. Medical consumerism

How can healthcare organizations compete against disruptors in the growing environment of consumer choice? What are creative ideas for meeting consumer demand without adding cost?

Additional information will be shared during the two-day gathering. The CFO Exchange is one of six annual HealthLeaders Media events for healthcare thought leadership and networking.

Revenue cycle and patient financial experience

Recently, HealthLeaders Media hosted a Revenue Cycle Exchange, which brought together 50 executives to discuss improving the patient financial experience; maximizing reimbursement; managing claims denials; technology adoption and data analytics; revenue cycle optimization; and creating a leaner, more effective team.

Noting how consumerism is influencing bill payment and giving rise to the patient voice, leaders are seeking ways to make paying easier. Consumer feedback suggested easy-to-understand and consolidated statements.

“We have a single business office with Epic, so regardless of where a patient gets their services, they get one bill from our organization,” says Cassi Birnbaum, director of health information management and revenue integrity at UC San Diego Health.

“We’ve also created a position for a patient experience director, so any complaint goes through that unit and they’ll contact one of my supervisors to ensure the patient gets the answers they need. That’s helped a lot and provides a one-stop, concierge, patient-facing experience to help ensure the patient’s balance is paid,” Birnbaum says.

Providing estimates and leveraging technology are also helpful for fostering patient payments. More health systems are promoting MyChart, an online tool for patients to manage their health information, as well as kiosks in key locations.

“We have a patient portal in which you can see any outstanding balance at a hospital or clinic and decide what you want to pay today,” says Mary Wickersham, vice president of central business office services at Avera in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

“Patients can also extend their payments since we have a hyperlink that goes to the extended loan program if needed. With kiosks at our clinics, patients pull out their credit card and complete their copay. Nobody asks; they just automatically do it,” she says.

Staffing

Front- and back-end staff play an integral role in calculating payment estimates, collecting dollars in advance of procedures and tests, and communicating the often-puzzling connection between hospital charges for physician practice and provider-based department patients.

“One of our big challenges now is we’re bringing a lot of that back-end work to the front,” says Terri Etnier, director of system patient access at Indiana University Health in Bloomington, Indiana.

Centralizing processes

As facilities move toward centralized scheduling systems to manage reimbursement, some facilities are centralizing coding and billing processes.

“We don’t have a full comprehensive preregistration function for our clinics mainly due to volume. We’re piloting a preregistration group for our clinic visits to work accounts ahead of time since we are continuing to work toward automation,” says Katherine Cardwell, assistant vice president at Ochsner Health System in New Orleans.

“We have kiosks in some of our clinics. Epic has an e-precheck function where we can now do forms. You can sign forms on your phone, and make your payment and your copayment ahead of time. And you can actually get a barcode that you can just scan when you get to the clinic,” Cardwell says.

INSURANCE CONSOLIDATION MAY SOON INCLUDE HOSPITALS, CREATE POWERHOUSES

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/finance/insurance-consolidation-may-soon-include-hospitals-create-powerhouses

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Recent moves to consolidate insurance customers under one corporate structure could lead next to carriers acquiring hospital networks.

The continued market consolidation and efforts to create an “all-in-one” approach to healthcare insurance customers may lead to carriers acquiring large hospital networks, particularly if the CVS-Aetna transaction proves to be successful and profitable, one analyst says.

The mergers and acquisitions in the insurance industry over the last year is the preamble for what will happen over the next two years, says CEO of Tom Borzilleri of InteliSys Health, a company aimed at bringing greater transparency to prescription drug prices, and the former founder and CEO of a pharmacy benefit manager (PBM).

The effort will ramp up to include hospitals if health plans start seeing financial rewards from the recent moves, he says.

“We are seeing carriers acquiring PBMs, as with Cigna/Express Scripts, and pharmacy chains/PBMs acquiring carriers, like CVS/Aetna, in search of cost efficiencies to increase earnings,” he says. “One may view these mergers and acquisitions as a favorable strategy to delivering both cost savings and patient convenience, but this strategy also has the potential to produce a serious negative effect on other critical stakeholders like doctors, hospitals, clinics, and others.”

In the past, many carriers managed their pharmacy benefits internally and found that it would be more cost-efficient to outsource that function to third-party PBMs, Borzilleri notes.

“As the PBM industry grew significantly over the last decade, allowing PBMs to gain market share and buying power for the millions of lives they managed, it opened the door for PBMs to methodically profiteer at the expense of both the carriers and their insured through the vague and complicated contracts for services the carriers were forced to sign,” he says.

Borzilleri continues, “In essence, the carriers really didn’t know what they were paying for at the end of the day for these services. As the market began to change with the onset of a movement and demand within the industry for more price transparency, carriers began to realize that they would be better served to bring the PBM function back in-house to reduce costs and increase earnings.”

CREATING A CLOSED LOOP

Borzilleri explains that a merger like the CVS-Aetna acquisition provides the insurer the ability to:

  • Control drug costs by eliminating the profits that the PBM formerly enjoyed
  • Realize cost efficiencies to dispense medications at the pharmacy level
  • Directly employ the providers that can treat their members at a cost much lower than the reimbursement rates they currently pay their network doctors
  • Create a brand-new revenue stream from the retail products sold in these stores

That brings a ton of reward to CVS-Aetna, but not to anyone else, Borzilleri says.

“This type of closed-loop network will limit patient options to everything from who will be treating them, where they will be treated, and how much they will be forced to pay for services and their prescriptions,” he says.

“Based on the millions of patient lives that both CVS-Caremark and Aetna manage, patients will be herded into their own locations to be treated by their own doctors/providers and the independent physician or practice will be significantly impacted. So in essence, both the patients and doctors who treat them will lose,” Borzilleri says.

RETURNING TO CLASSIC DESIGN

Hospital acquisition also could be driven by consumers, says Bill Shea, vice president  of Cognizant, a company providing digital, consulting, and other services to healthcare providers. As consumers select health services on demand, they will create their own systems of care instead of relying on a third party to do so, he says.

“The impact of these changes likely means integrated delivery systems must focus on providing on-demand healthcare and do so on a large scale. These systems can point to the proven value of offering a vetted and curated set of cost-effective providers and coordinating care to deliver better cost and quality outcomes,” Shea says.

Health plans also may consider returning to their pre-managed care origins to purse a classic insurance model of benefit design, risk management, and underwriting, he says. Some organizations could become a one-stop shop for every insurance need.

“These diversified insurance players will have the economies of scale to better manage profit and loss across multiple lines of business and to take creative approaches to health-related insurance, such as offering personalized policies targeted to specific market segments,” Shea says.

MORE STATE, REGIONAL MOVES

Consolidation is likely to increase at the state and regional level, says Suzanne Delbanco, PhD, executive director of Catalyst for Payment Reform.

“As providers with market dominance command higher prices, insurers will need to amass greater market power to push back. This means fewer choices of insurers for employers, other healthcare purchasers and consumers,” Delbanco says.

She says, “Fewer choices means less competition and less pressure to innovate. It’s possible we’ll see more of the integrated delivery systems and accountable care organizations beginning to offer insurance products where state laws and regulations allow them to as new entrants into the market.”

Those changes will make it more and more difficult to thrive as a small insurer or a small provider, she says.

Also, while rising prices and a continuation of uneven quality will motivate employers and other healthcare purchasers to demand greater transparency into provider performance and prices, larger players may more easily resist that call, she says.

“Increasingly it will be a seller’s game, not a buyer’s,” Delbanco says. “While quality measurement, provider payment reforms, and healthcare delivery reforms increasingly move toward putting the patient at the center, this may be more lip service than reality. Even if consumers end up with more information to make smarter decisions, their options may have dwindled to ones that are largely unaffordable.”

 

Medicare Takes Aim At Boomerang Hospitalizations Of Nursing Home Patients

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/06/13/619259541/medicare-takes-aim-at-boomerang-hospitalizations-of-nursing-home-patients

“Oh my God, we dropped her!” Sandra Snipes said she heard the nursing home aides yell as she fell to the floor.

She landed on her right side where her hip had recently been replaced. She cried out in pain.

A hospital clinician later discovered her hip was dislocated.

That was not the only injury Snipes, then 61, said she suffered in 2011 at Richmond Pines Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center in Hamlet, N.C. Nurses allegedly had been injecting her twice a day with a potent blood thinner despite written instructions to stop.

“She said, ‘I just feel so tired,’ ” her daughter, Laura Clark, said in an interview. “The nurses were saying she’s depressed and wasn’t doing her exercises. I said no, something is wrong.”

Her children also discovered Snipes’ surgical wound had become infected and infested with insects. Just 11 days after she arrived at the nursing home to heal from her hip surgery, she was back in the hospital.

The fall and these other alleged lapses in care led Clark and the family to file a lawsuit against the nursing home. Richmond Pines declined to discuss the case beyond saying it disputed the allegations at the time. The home agreed in 2017 to pay Snipes’ family $1.4 million to settle their lawsuit.

While the confluence of complications in Snipes’ case was extreme, return trips from nursing homes to hospitals are far from unusual.

With hospitals pushing patients out the door earlier, nursing homes are deluged with increasingly frail patients. But many homes, with their sometimes-skeletal medical staffing, often fail to handle post-hospital complications — or create new problems by not heeding or receiving accurate hospital and physician instructions.

Patients, caught in the middle, may suffer. One in 5 Medicare patients sent from the hospital to a nursing home boomerangs back within 30 days, often for potentially preventable conditions such as dehydration, infections and medication errors, federal records show. Such rehospitalizations occur 27 percent more frequently than for the Medicare population at large.

Nursing homes have been unintentionally rewarded by decades of colliding government payment policies, which gave both hospitals and nursing homes financial incentives for the transfers. That has left the most vulnerable patients often ping-ponging between institutions, wreaking havoc with patients’ care.

“There’s this saying in nursing homes, and it’s really unfortunate: ‘When in doubt, ship them out,’ ” said David Grabowski, a professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School. “It’s a short-run, cost-minimizing strategy, but it ends up costing the system and the individual a lot more.”

In recent years, the government has begun to tackle the problem. In 2013, Medicare began fining hospitals for high readmission rates in an attempt to curtail premature discharges and to encourage hospitals to refer patients to nursing homes with good track records.

Starting this October, the government will address the other side of the equation, giving nursing homes bonuses or assessing penalties based on their Medicare rehospitalization rates. The goal is to accelerate early signs of progress: The rate of potentially avoidable readmissions dropped to 10.8 percent in 2016 from 12.4 percent in 2011, according to Congress’ Medicare Payment Advisory Commission.

“We’re better, but not well,” Grabowski said. “There’s still a high rate of inappropriate readmissions.”

The revolving door is an unintended byproduct of long-standing payment policies. Medicare pays hospitals a set rate to care for a patient depending on the average time it takes to treat a typical patient with a given diagnosis. That means that hospitals effectively profit by earlier discharge and lose money by keeping patients longer, even though an elderly patient may require a few extra days.

But nursing homes have their own incentives to hospitalize patients. For one thing, keeping patients out of hospitals requires frequent examinations and speedy laboratory tests — all of which add costs to nursing homes.

Plus, most nursing home residents are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal program for the poor that is usually the lowest-paying form of insurance. If a nursing home sends a Medicaid resident to the hospital, she usually returns with up to 100 days covered by Medicare, which pays more. On top of all that, in some states, Medicaid pays a “bed-hold” fee when a patient is hospitalized.

None of this is good for the patients. Nursing home residents often return from the hospital more confused or with a new infection, said Dr. David Gifford, a senior vice president of quality and regulatory affairs at the American Health Care Association, a nursing home trade group.

“And they never quite get back to normal,” he said.

‘She Looked Like A Wet Washcloth’

Communication lapses between physicians and nursing homes is one recurring cause of rehospitalizations. Elaine Essa had been taking thyroid medication ever since that gland was removed when she was a teenager. Essa, 82, was living at a nursing home in Lancaster, Calif., in 2013 when a bout of pneumonia sent her to the hospital.

When she returned to the nursing home — now named Wellsprings Post-Acute Care Center — her doctor omitted a crucial instruction from her admission order: to resume the thyroid medication, according to a lawsuit filed by her family. The nursing home telephoned Essa’s doctor to order the medication, but he never called them back, the suit said.

Without the medication, Essa’s appetite diminished, her weight increased and her energy vanished — all indications of a thyroid imbalance, said the family’s attorney, Ben Yeroushalmi, discussing the lawsuit. Her doctors from Garrison Family Medical Group never visited her, sending instead their nurse practitioner. He, like the nursing home employees, did not grasp the cause of her decline, although her thyroid condition was prominently noted in her medical records, the lawsuit said.

Three months after her return from the hospital, “she looked like a wet washcloth. She had no color in her face,” said Donna Jo Duncan, a daughter, in a deposition. Duncan said she demanded the home’s nurses check her mother’s blood pressure. When they did, a supervisor ran over and said, “Call an ambulance right away,” Duncan said in the deposition.

At the hospital, a physician said tests showed “zero” thyroid hormone levels, Deborah Ann Favorite, a daughter, recalled in an interview. She testified in her deposition that the doctor told her, “I can’t believe that this woman is still alive.”

Essa died the next month. The nursing home and the medical practice settled the case for confidential amounts. Cynthia Schein, an attorney for the home, declined to discuss the case beyond saying it was “settled to everyone’s satisfaction.” The suit is still ongoing against one other doctor, who did not respond to requests for comment.

Dangers In Discouraging Hospitalization

Out of the nation’s 15,630 nursing homes, one-fifth send 25 percent or more of their patients back to the hospital, according to a Kaiser Health News analysis of data on Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare website. On the other end of the spectrum, the fifth of homes with the lowest readmission rates return fewer than 17 percent of residents to the hospital.

Many health policy experts say that spread shows how much improvement is possible. But patient advocates fear the campaign against hospitalizing nursing home patients may backfire, especially when Medicare begins linking readmission rates to its payments.

“We’re always worried the bad nursing homes are going to get the message ‘Don’t send anyone to the hospital,’ ” said Tony Chicotel, a staff attorney at California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, a nonprofit based in San Francisco.

Richmond Pines, where Sandra Snipes stayed, has a higher than average rehospitalization rate of 25 percent, according to federal records. But the family’s lawyer, Kyle Nutt, said the lawsuit claimed the nurses initially resisted sending Snipes back, insisting she was “just drowsy.”

After Snipes was rehospitalized, her blood thinner was discontinued, her hip was reset, and she was discharged to a different nursing home, according to the family’s lawsuit. But her hospital trips were not over: When she showed signs of recurrent infection, the second home sent her to yet another hospital, the lawsuit alleged.

Ultimately, the lawsuit claimed that doctors removed her prosthetic hip and more than a liter of infected blood clots and tissues. Nutt said if Richmond Pines’ nurses had “caught the over-administration of the blood thinner right off the bat, we don’t think any of this would have happened.”

Snipes returned home but was never able to walk again, according to the lawsuit. Her husband, William, cared for her until she died in 2015, her daughter, Clark, said.

“She didn’t want to go back into the nursing home,” Clark said. “She was terrified.”

 

 

 

8 healthcare leaders share their No. 1 piece of advice

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-management-administration/8-healthcare-leaders-share-their-no-1-piece-of-advice.html

Good leadership advice is meant to be shared. Here eight healthcare leaders — including CEOs, CFOs and chief strategy officers — offer the No. 1 piece of advice they would give other leaders in their field.

1. Rob Bloom, CFO of Carthage (N.Y.) Area Hospital. “The best advice I have is to find the courage to change what must be changed and accept those things that cannot be changed in the short term. Regardless of whether a hospital is profitable or struggling, there will be challenges. The difficult task is to determine where to focus resources while accepting criticism for problems that will not change the short-term viability of the organization. You have to learn to trust your judgment and resist pressures from others that might tempt you to alter your course based on their lack of understanding. It is very much a triage process: Stop the bleeding first, then worry about infection later.”

2. Mona Chadha, chief strategy officer of San Francisco-based Dignity Health’s Bay Area. “One of the key strengths of being a good leader is really listening and leading people by example. That to me is one of the successes. Then, do some thinking outside of the box. That’s been my mantra of success in the past.”

3. JoAnn Kunkel, CFO of Sioux Falls, S.D.-based Sanford Health. “The very first CFO I worked for in 1990 always said, ‘you’re only as good as your team. … I’d never be able to be successful without having you and the team working with me.’ [That CFO] was a very thoughtful and inclusive leader. He gave me opportunities to be part of the team and think strategically and develop into a leader. So since then, it’s always been my belief that we have a very strong team that should always participate. If we have someone that needs help, we have multiple individuals ready to step up. And working together makes us all better. My advice would be: It’s important to remember you are only as good as your team. Sometimes I think when you get into these leadership roles you can forget that. You always want to be inclusive, give credit to the work and the team and the efforts that help make you successful in your role.”

4. Michael McAnder, CFO of Atlanta-based Piedmont Healthcare. “I think what I’d say is try and look for the long-term play. You can’t manage this business on a day-to-day basis. You have to have a clear direction and stick with it. I think that’s probably the thing our CEO Kevin Brown has done really well. I have never worked at an organization with a one-page strategic plan before. Every meeting starts with it, and we use it at every presentation. That consistency has brought clarity. It’s also why we’ve gone from five hospitals to 11 in the three years I’ve been here. That resonates with other organizations when we talk about our plan. It’s really important. In addition, obviously, you have to act with integrity and character. If you’re in a position where you can’t do that, you have to make a different decision about whether you can keep working for someone.”

5. Alan B. Miller, CEO of King of Prussia, Pa.-based Universal Health Services. “I often give a few pieces of advice to other CEOs and leaders, including:

  • Character is destiny — a person with good character will always be better off in life. Choose your friends carefully because you are known by the friends you keep.
  • Hard work is critical. If you are going to do something, do it well.
  • Hire the best team possible. Build trust, and rally the team to focus on a common goal.”

6. David Parsons, MD, CMO of Portland-based Northwest Permanente. “Listen to the people you lead and be honest about which problems you can solve and which ones you can’t. People usually don’t mind being told no as long as you are direct and honest about the reasons why. People detest ambivalence.”

7. Mike Pykosz, CEO and founder of Chicago-based Oak Street Health. “Be persistent and be motivated by your mission. One thing we found really early was everything is a lot harder and takes a lot longer than you think it will. Things that make a lot of sense to you and are super logical will always take a little longer. [Success] requires breaking down a lot of little barriers, including a lot of inefficiencies, a lot of complexities and mindshare. But whatever it is, be persistent and have faith that if you’re trying to do the right thing, and if you stay at it, you’ll be able to break down those barriers and accomplish these things.”

8. Michael Wallace, president and CEO of Fort Atkinson, Wis.-based Fort HealthCare. “I’d say visualize the outcome you want and then go get it. I also like the phrase ‘try hard, fail fast, move on, start over.’ You’re one step closer to a solution if the last one didn’t work. But don’t let perfect get in the way of good. I like to be 8 for 10 rather than 3 for 3. Failure is the byproduct of trying to move an organization forward. If I get 8 of 10 things right, I am going to end up further along, closer to my vision than if I wait to be sure about everything to get that perfect 3 for 3.”

 

 

More than a quarter of major health systems plan Medicare Advantage launch, though many lack confidence

http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/more-quarter-major-health-systems-plan-medicare-advantage-launch-though-many-lack-confidence?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWkdSaE9UZzRPV0poTW1FeCIsInQiOiJTK1lnZEdEakdOVlZNYWRBSzF5M3o1d3BRWmpQXC8ydVBYN2lFY01mUEQwbnhTVjBIU2NScmdIMWtXcjN3NGpXb1NoSG53clwvXC90TzJ1QWFPRWpoeGFtXC9jSHl4TFwvbDgwMEZYaU1kVmxRa1NCNHloRk9lK0VUZFBkVEVuV1hHTytIIn0%3D

 

Executives say the top reason for launching a Medicare Advantage plan is the opportunity to capture more value.

A new survey from Lumeris found that 27 percent of major U.S. health system executives intend to launch a Medicare Advantage plan in the next four years. Despite that, confidence among these same execs is lacking, with only 29 percent reporting they felt confident in their organization’s ability to make the launch successfully.

“These survey findings are consistent with our conversations with healthcare executives across the country who are feeling a sense of urgency around Medicare Advantage strategies, but also realize that this type of work is vastly different than traditional health system operations,” said Jeff Carroll, executive director of health plans at Lumeris, by statement.

In April, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced it was releasing Medicare Advantage encounter data for the first time by request from the CMS Research Data Assistance Center. The MA encounter data, starting from 2015, provides detailed information about services to beneficiaries enrolled in a Medicare Advantage managed plan. It will give researchers insight into the care delivered under MA plans and will help them improve the Medicare program, CMS said. Annual updates are planned.

According to the 90 executives Lumeris surveyed from major health systems, the top reason for launching a Medicare Advantage plan is the opportunity to capture more value by controlling a greater portion of the premium dollar as compared to fee-for-service Medicare.

Other key drivers cited include market and regulatory trends supporting Medicare Advantage. In particular, shrinking Medicare margins could threaten the viability of hospitals and health systems as the senior population continues to grow and becomes a larger proportion of providers’ patient panels.

The respondents also recognized that launching a Medicare Advantage plan will be challenging due to the complexities of operating an insurance plan, which are far different than the capabilities required to successfully operate a health system.

They also shared concerns about the significant financial investment required and an overall lack of expertise in the health plan space. The majority of respondents, 59 percent, indicated they were likely to use outside resources to launch their plans — and that those resources are very likely to include a vendor partner that can mitigate operational risk.

“Launching and managing a Medicare Advantage plan requires skills beyond the core competencies of most health systems, which is one reason many provider-sponsored plans fail in the first few years,” Carroll said. “Through those failures, it has become clear that providers who select the right partners increase the likelihood for greater success in a shorter period of time.”

 

AHA report: Hospitals spend almost $3 trillion, support more than 16 million jobs

http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/aha-report-hospitals-spend-almost-3-trillion-support-more-16-million-jobs?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWkdSaE9UZzRPV0poTW1FeCIsInQiOiJTK1lnZEdEakdOVlZNYWRBSzF5M3o1d3BRWmpQXC8ydVBYN2lFY01mUEQwbnhTVjBIU2NScmdIMWtXcjN3NGpXb1NoSG53clwvXC90TzJ1QWFPRWpoeGFtXC9jSHl4TFwvbDgwMEZYaU1kVmxRa1NCNHloRk9lK0VUZFBkVEVuV1hHTytIIn0%3D

Every dollar a hospital spends yields roughly $2.30 of additional business activity; for every hospital job, another two are supported.

A new report from the American Hospital Association highlights just how much hospitals are driving their local economies, as well the national one, with data showing hospitals directly employ nearly 6 million people and purchase more than $900 billion worth of goods and services from other businesses.

But that’s not all. Enter the ripple effect. The goods and services hospitals buy drive economic vitality throughout their communities, with each hospital job supporting roughly two additional jobs in the community. Every dollar a hospital spends yields roughly $2.30 of additional business activity.

When you incorporate that ripple effects into calculations, the AHA reported hospitals actually support 16.5 million jobs nationwide and almost $3 trillion in economic activity.

“In 2016, America’s hospitals treated 143 million people in their emergency departments, provided 605 million outpatient visits, performed over 27 million surgeries and delivered nearly 4 million babies. Every year, hospitals provide vital health care services like these to hundreds of millions of people in thousands of communities. However, the importance of hospitals to their communities extends far beyond health care,” the AHA said.

When it come to states whose hospitals send the most money into the their economies, it’s no surprise that California is the top spender, with $103 billion in total expenditures. Factor in that ripple effect and the Golden State’s total economic output from its hospitals more than doubles to $230 billion.

New York, Texas, Florida and Pennsylvania rounded out the top five states that are most impacted by hospital expenditures, the report said.

When it comes to a hospitals impact on the state’s labor force, it’s not just about who creates the most. Maine is actually the state most impacted by hospital job creation with total of 38,105 hospital jobs. That hospital workforce makes up a little more than 14 percent of the states overall workforce. Ohio was the second most impacted state, with 298,371 hospital jobs that constitute just almost 13 percent of the state’s workforce.

Minnesota, West Virginia and Massachusetts rounded out the other top five states whose workforce is impacted by hospital jobs. Minnesota’s hospital workforce constitutes a little more than 12 percent of the overall state force, West Virginia’s hospital workforce was nearly 11.7 percent and Massachusetts was almost the same with 11.6 percent.

As both healthcare and economic cornerstones of their communities, the pressure is greater for hospitals leaders to find new ways to add value, maintain financial margins and keep doors open. That is one of the drivers behind the rash of merger and acquisition activity. With ever-increasing regulatory burdens that require more manpower or physician’s time to manage, coupled with the need to make much needed updates in technology, modernize facilities to meet current trends or just maintain appropriate levels of care and accommodation for patients, not to mention staying competitive for hospitals in areas where other systems want to dip into their patient volumes, hospital leaders are eyeing mergers as a means of keeping doors open sot they can continue to support their communities both clinically and economically.