CMS seeks input on Stark Law changes amid value-based care shift

https://www.healthcaredive.com/news/cms-seeks-input-on-stark-law-changes-amid-value-based-care-shift/526239/

Related image

Dive Brief:

  • The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services asked stakeholders Wednesday for input on how to change the Stark Law to allow for better care coordination and new alternative payment models or other novel financial arrangements.
  • The American Hospital Association has been vocal in pushing for changes to the physician self-referral law, calling it outdated. AHA argues the law presents “nearly impenetrable roadblocks in the move toward value-based care.”
  • The agency specifically is requesting input on what new exemptions to the Stark Law are needed to protect accountable care organization models, bundled payment models and other payment models, including how to allow coordination care outside of an alternative payment model. It also asks for help examining definitions for terminology such as risk-sharing, enrollee, gain-sharing and other terms.

Dive Insight:

The Stark Law, enacted in 1989, aims to cut down on financial incentives impacting physician care decisions. It prohibits certain Medicare-payable referrals to entities they have a financial or familial relationship with, and stops such entities from filing Medicare claims for referred services, unless exempted under certain instances.

CMS says that it is issuing the RFI in response to comments it has received that raised concern that the Stark Law is impeding participation in healthcare delivery and payment reform efforts.

“We are particularly interested in your thoughts on issues that include, but are not limited to, the structure of arrangements between parties that participate in alternative payment models or other novel financial arrangements, the need for revisions or additions to exceptions to the physician self-referral law, and terminology related to alternative payment models and the physician self-referral law,” the CMS notice states.

In a statement submitted by AHA to the House Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Ways and Means, the group urged Congress to step in to change Stark Law to allow hospitals and physicians to more closely work together.

“Congress should create a clear and comprehensive safe harbor under the anti-kickback law for arrangements designed to foster collaboration in the delivery of health care and incentivize and reward efficiencies and improvement in care,” AHA said.  “In addition, the Stark Law should be reformed to focus exclusively on ownership arrangements. Compensation arrangements should be subject to oversight solely under the anti-kickback law.”

CMS Administrator Seema Verma appears to be sympathetic. In a Wednesday blog post, she said the Stark Law may be prohibiting value-based arrangements that HHS has made a priority to shift towards. Previously, Verma said that CMS was going to put together an inter-agency group to examine potential changes to the law.

“I think that Stark was developed a long time ago, and this gets to where we are going modernizing the program,” Verma told AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack during a webcast in January. “The payment systems and how we are operating is different, and we need to bring along some of those regulations and figure out what we can do. And I’m not sure that this is not going to require some congressional intervention as well.”

CMS is asking for comments to be submitted on the RFI by August 24.

 

Gut check: Change is coming, and healthcare executives don’t necessarily think it’s a bad thing

http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/gut-check-change-coming-and-healthcare-executives-dont-necessarily-think-its-bad-thing

Self-Discovery

The future of healthcare policy is a bit murky these days. President-elect Donald Trump has pledged to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and the Republican-run U.S. Congress is already fast at work to make that happen.

What’s not known, however, is what will change for the thousands of U.S. healthcare businesses that have not only adapted to the ACA but also made millions in investments in areas such as electronic health records, value-based reimbursement and reporting to align with the policies of the outgoing administration.

Healthcare Finance spoke with several executives at healthcare businesses to get their perspectives on not only the changes they expect but also their thoughts on what the healthcare sector actually needs to do to provide the best care while still safeguarding the health of its business model.