Haven, the Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan venture to disrupt health care, is disbanding after 3 years

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/01/04/haven-the-amazon-berkshire-jpmorgan-venture-to-disrupt-healthcare-is-disbanding-after-3-years.html

Haven, the Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan venture to disrupt health care, is disbanding  after 3 years

KEY POINTS

  • Haven began informing employees Monday that it will shut down by the end of next month, according to people with direct knowledge of the matter.
  • Many of the Boston-based firm’s 57 workers are expected to be placed at Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway or JPMorgan Chase as the firms each individually push forward in their efforts, the people said.
  • One key issue facing Haven was that each of the three founding companies executed their own projects separately with their own employees, obviating the need for the joint venture to begin with, according to the people, who declined to be identified speaking about the matter.

Haven, the joint venture formed by three of America’s most powerful companies to lower costs and improve outcomes in health care, is disbanding after three years, CNBC has learned exclusively.

The company began informing employees Monday that it will shut down by the end of next month, according to people with direct knowledge of the matter.

Many of the Boston-based firm’s 57 workers are expected to be placed at AmazonBerkshire Hathaway or JPMorgan Chase as the firms each individually push forward in their efforts, and the three companies are still expected to collaborate informally on health-care projects, the people said.

The announcement three years ago that the CEOs of Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase had teamed up to tackle one of the biggest problems facing corporate America – high and rising costs for employee health care  – sent shock waves throughout the world of medicine. Shares of health-care companies tumbled on fears about how the combined might of leaders in technology and finance could wring costs out of the system.

The move to shutter Haven may be a sign of how difficult it is to radically improve American health care, a complicated and entrenched system of doctors, insurers, drugmakers and middlemen that costs the country $3.5 trillion every year. Last year, Berkshire CEO Warren Buffett seemed to indicate as much, saying that were was no guarantee that Haven would succeed in improving health care.

Shares of UnitedHealth GroupHumana and CVS Health each climbed more than 2% after the Haven news broke.

One key issue facing Haven was that while the firm came up with ideas, each of the three founding companies executed their own projects separately with their own employees, obviating the need for the joint venture to begin with, according to the people, who declined to be identified speaking about the matter.

Coming just three years after the initial rush of fanfare about the possibilities for what Haven could accomplish, its closure is a disappointment to some. But insiders claim that it will allow the founding companies to implement ideas from the project on their own, tailoring them to the specific needs of their employees, who are mostly concentrated in different cities.

The move comes after Haven’s CEO, Dr. Atul Gawande, stepped down from day-to-day management of the nonprofit in May, a change that sparked a search for his successor.

Brooke Thurston, a spokeswoman for Haven, confirmed the company’s plans to close and gave this statement:

The Haven team made good progress exploring a wide range of healthcare solutions, as well as piloting new ways to make primary care easier to access, insurance benefits simpler to understand and easier to use, and prescription drugs more affordable,” Thurston said in an email.

Moving forward, Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Chase & Co. will leverage these insights and continue to collaborate informally to design programs tailored to address the specific needs of our individual employee populations and locations,” she said.

Billionaire sells $109M of CHS stock

Chinese billionaire with ambitions to reshape investment models | Financial  Times

Chinese investor Tianqiao Chen and his group of companies have a 12.2 percent stake in Franklin, Tenn.-based Community Health Systems after selling nearly 13 million shares of the company in the past month, according to Securities and Exchange Commission filings. 

Mr. Chen and his Shanda Group company affiliates sold 3.4 million shares of CHS on Dec. 14 for between $8.50 and $8.71 per share, bringing in a total of $28.5 million. The move comes after he sold 5 million shares of CHS from Nov. 10-12 and another 4.6 million shares Nov. 23. Those sales brought in a total of $81.2 million.

Mr. Chen, a pioneer in China’s online gaming industry, began buying up shares of CHS in 2016. The last public comment the investor made about CHS was in 2018, when Shanda Group said it had a “good relationship” with CHS and supported the company’s strategy and management team. 

Chinese billionaire sells additional $40M of CHS stock

Chinese billionaire with ambitions to reshape investment models | Financial  Times

Chinese investor Tianqiao Chen and his group of companies have a 14.96 percent stake in Franklin, Tenn.-based Community Health Systems after recently selling nearly 4.6 million shares of the company, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.

Mr. Chen and his Shanda Group company affiliates sold the shares Nov. 23 for between $8.66 and $9.08 per share, bringing in a total of $39.8 million. The move comes after he sold 5 million shares of CHS from Nov. 10-12 for $41.46 million.  

Mr. Chen, a pioneer in China’s online gaming industry, began buying up shares of CHS in 2016. The last public comment the investor made about CHS was in 2018, when Shanda Group said it had a “good relationship” with CHS and supported the company’s strategy and management team.

Mednax sells off its radiology division

https://mailchi.mp/365734463200/the-weekly-gist-september-11-2020?e=d1e747d2d8

M&A Analysis: Mednax to Sell its Radiology and Teleradiology Business -

National physician staffing firm Mednax announced the sale of its radiology practice—which includes teleradiology company Virtual Radiologic, known as vRad—to venture-backed Radiology Partners for $885M.

Publicly-traded Mednax has been hit hard by both contracting disputes with UnitedHealthcare, as well as pandemic-related volume declines. Both its anesthesiology and radiology businesses suffered big losses with the halt of elective procedures in the spring, and saw volumes decline between 50-70 percent compared to the prior year.

The company began divesting in May with the sale of its anesthesiology division to investor-backed North American Partners in Anesthesia. Mednax leaders say these decisions to sell were made independent of the pandemic, and that they have been planning to return to the company’s roots of focusing exclusively on obstetrics and pediatric subspecialty care, including changing its name back to Pediatrix.

Acquiring firm Radiology Partners is the largest radiology practice in the country, working with 1,300 hospitals and healthcare facilities. With this acquisition, it will have 2,400 radiologists practicing in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Hospital-based physician staffing firms have been especially hard hit by COVID-induced volume declines. This has created a softening in valuations and opened the door for investment firms to accelerate practice purchases.

We expect the pace of deals to quicken as independent practices experience continued financial strain—with large national groups leading the way, taking advantage of lower practice prices to build large-scale specialty enterprises.

 

 

 

 

Trinity Health sees net income plunge 60% as operating margin improves

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/trinity-health-sees-net-income-plunge-60-as-operating-margin-improves.html

Image result for trinity health headquarters

Trinity Health recorded higher revenue and operating income in the first quarter of fiscal year 2020 than in the same period a year earlier, but the Livonia, Mich.-based system ended the quarter with lower net income, according to unaudited financial documents.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2020, which ended Sept. 30, Trinity reported operating revenue of $4.8 billion, a 1.8 percent increase over the same period of the year prior. Operating expenses climbed 1.7 percent year over year to $4.7 billion.

Trinity ended the first quarter of fiscal 2020 with operating income of $94 million, up from $87 million in the first quarter of last year.

The system reported an operating margin of 2 percent in the first quarter of fiscal 2020, compared to an operating margin of 1.8 percent in the same period of the year prior. Margin growth was partially attributable to Trinity’s divestiture of Camden, N.J.-based Lourdes Health System in June. Growth in patient volumes and payment rates also supported margin growth.

After factoring in nonoperating items, including a decline in investment returns, Trinity reported net income of $166.4 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2020. That’s compared to the first quarter of fiscal 2019, when the system posted net income of $419.9 million.

 

 

Has Community Health Systems Finally Bottomed Out?

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/strategy/has-community-health-systems-finally-bottomed-out

After selling more than 80 hospitals in three years, leaders of the large for-profit hospital operator are suggesting the worst may be behind them.


KEY TAKEAWAYS

The troubled operator of rural hospitals is focusing now on growth-oriented markets.

The latest round of questions and accusations adds to the tumultuous past five years.

Some analysts say CHS isn’t poised for where the market is headed: outpatient services and value-based care.

Times have been tough for Community Health Systems Chairman and CEO Wayne T. Smith, who is voicing an optimistic message this year as the hospital operator continues to navigate choppy waters.

Smith and fellow CHS senior executives told investors this month that the company expects to complete its massive and long-running divestiture plan by the end of 2019, having already shed 81 hospitals from its portfolio in the three preceding years. The company, based in Franklin, Tennessee, operated 106 hospitals across 18 states as of the end of the first quarter.

While the divestitures give CHS cash to pay down its debt, they are also part of a strategic effort to align CHS operations with the geographic areas where the company sees the greatest growth potential, Smith said.


“This has allowed the company to shift more of our resources to more sustainable markets, ones with better population growth, better economic growth, and lower unemployment, which provides us an opportunity for sustainable growth,” Smith said during the first-quarter earnings call this month.

“As we complete additional divestitures, we expect our same-store metrics to further improve,” he added. “This will lead to not only additional debt reduction but also better cash flow performance and lower leverage ratios.”

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Thomas J. Aaron echoed that message at the Goldman Sachs Leveraged Finance Conference this month. While CHS was truly a rural hospital company 15 years ago, Aaron said the post-selloff organization is investing strategically in markets where it anticipates growth.

“We’d rather compete in a growing pie than have more market share in a pie that’s shrinking,” Aaron said.

“We feel like we’re well-positioned,” he said.

But the positive forecast is a bit of a tough sell, especially when you consider how bad the past five years have been:

  • Questionable HMA Acquisition: In 2014, CHS completed its $7.6 billion acquisition of Florida-based hospital operator Health Management Associates, Inc. (HMA), in what is widely viewed in hindsight as a bad move. In addition to a $260 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice, a subsidiary of HMA pleaded guilty to criminal fraud last year for alleged misconduct that predated the acquisition by CHS—allegations that Smith knew about before the deal was final. “We were aware of the issues they had,” Aaron said this month. “We went ahead and closed on the transaction, confident that we could get the cost synergy, and we felt like they had some great assets.”
  • Major Stock Market Woes: In 2015, the price of CHS shares peaked at nearly $53 apiece, according to New York Stock Exchange data. But by the end of that year, shares had lost more than half of that value. Share prices continued to slide the following year and haven’t made a meaningful recovery since. They have been trading below $5 so far this year.
  • Lackluster Quorum Spin-off: In 2016, CHS spun off 38 hospitals to form Quorum Health Corporation. The spin-off severely underperformed expectations, and investors began asking questions. Quorum formally responded to those investors with a letter that acknowledged several reasons to question the “operational competence” of CHS leaders who backed the spin-off. A related dispute between Quorum and CHS ended in arbitration earlier this year.
  • Ongoing Hospital Divestitures: In 2017, CHS sold 30 hospitals, followed by another 13 hospitals in 2018, Aaron said. So far this year, CHS has announced the sale of at least seven more: one in Tennessee, two in Florida, and four in South Carolina. A spokesperson for CHS did not respond to HealthLeaders‘ request for additional information and comment.
  • Recurring Bankruptcy Questions: Industry analysts have wondered for years whether bankruptcy may be on the horizon for CHS. Those questions were renewed again this month when Ryan Heslop, a portfolio manager for Firefly Value Partners LP, took a short position against the company and said a CHS bankruptcy is likely in the next few years, as Reuters reported. About that same time, Smith invested more than $3 million in CHS stock, according to two Securities and Exchange Commission filings. (Smith, 73, who has been CEO for 22 years, now directly and indirectly controls about 2.8% of the company, as the Nashville Post reported.)
  • Call for CEO’s Ouster: With the release of a report this month titled “Other People’s Money,” the National Nurses United (NNU) group accused Smith of squandering CHS’ assets and called for him to be removed. “The fact that Smith remains at CHS’ helm, given a series of fatal calculations that set the company on a downward spiral, is a real wonder,” the NNU report states. Shareholders, however, voted overwhelmingly in favor of keeping Smith as a director and significantly increasing his incentive plan compensation, according to SEC filings.

Despite the light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel rhetoric coming from CHS executives, there’s still real concern the company could come undone. That’s because CHS’ problems run deeper than its balance sheets, says Mark Cherry, MFA, a principal analyst at Market Access Insights for Decision Resources Group.

“Given the national trend toward provider consolidation, CHS might not remain intact even if it were financially healthy,” Cherry tells HealthLeaders in an email, adding that CHS seems to be unsuited for the industry’s ongoing shifts toward value-based payments and outpatient care delivery.

“There are only a few markets, like Scranton, Knoxville, and Northwest Arkansas, where CHS has enough presence to act as a stand-alone health system that can influence physician and patient behaviors,” Cherry says.

The structural problem is rooted in a bad strategic bet a decade ago, Cherry says.

“As markets and regions were coalescing around large integrated delivery networks focused on value-based care, CHS continued to invest in suburban facilities and demand high fee-for-service reimbursement,” Cherry says.

“Whereas operating a couple of suburban hospitals within a larger market once gave CHS access to better insured patients and leverage against payers who wanted to offer broad provider networks, the post-ACA landscape does not have as wide a uninsured discrepancy between urban and suburban areas,” he adds, “and payers are shifting to high-performance narrow networks, allowing them to cut CHS facilities out entirely if they are unwilling to compromise.