How the CFO enables the board’s success—during COVID-19 and beyond

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/how-the-cfo-enables-the-boards-success-during-covid-19-and-beyond?cid=other-eml-alt-mip-mck&hlkid=85d408119efe4175b478a0599b8302da&hctky=9502524&hdpid=ed9aa1f2-3c88-4b89-9cd2-61a12e2d602c

How the CFO can guide the board through crises and transformations ...

Two board experts explain how in times of crisis or transformation, the CFO can serve as a rock in the boardroom, a critical arbiter of difficult decisions, and a scout for the future.

Critical business decisions cannot be made unless management teams and boards of directors are on the same page. Transparency, fair and balanced dialogue, and well-structured processes for gaining agreement on strategic plans—these dynamics must be present in every boardroom, in good times and, especially, in bad.

The CFO plays an important role in ensuring that they are.

In crises, such as the global spread of the novel coronavirus, the CFO is best-positioned to provide the most relevant and up-to-date facts and figures, which can help boards find clarity amid chaos. In corporate transformations, the pragmatic, data-focused finance leader is the only one who can prompt the board to actively consider all the short- and long-term consequences of proposed strategy decisions.

Barbara Kux and Rick Haythornthwaite, longtime board directors for multiple global organizations, shared these and other board-related insights with McKinsey senior partner Vivian Hunt in a conversation that spanned two occasions: a gathering of CFOs in London some months ago and, more recently, follow-up phone conversations about the COVID-19 pandemic.

These interviews, which have been condensed and edited here, explained the importance of finance leaders in serving both as scouts for the future and as trusted translators of critical market information.

Shaping the COVID-19 crisis response and recovery

Rick Haythornthwaite: The board’s most important functions in the wake of COVID-19 are threefold: one is making sure that employees are being treated decently and that the company is taking all the precautions it can. Second is obtaining an objective, insightful understanding of the business and trends. And third is anticipating and preparing for recovery. The key in all three areas is having high-quality data to inform the board’s decisions and to share with employees. Of course, getting data from a market in freefall is never easy. This is where you need CFOs to be absolutely on top of their game.

The board needs to know what is really happening to the top line, what short-term measures can be taken to preserve and boost cash, and all the actions you have to take during the early stage of such events to buy time. But the board must also have a handle on long-term issues.1 And now that we’re months into this crisis, people are starting to draw lessons from previous ones and bringing some historical data into board discussions. The CFO can use these data to construct hard-edge scenarios that prompt good conversations in the boardroom.

Barbara Kux: An important difference in the role of CFOs today, as compared with their role during the financial crisis in 2008, is that they need to simultaneously manage both short-term responsiveness and future recovery. The CFO must keep the ship floating through rough waters—safeguarding employees’ health, securing liquidity, monitoring cash flow and payment terms, ensuring the functioning of the supply chain, assessing effects on P&L and the balance sheet, reviewing customers’ and suppliers’ situations, and initiating cost-reduction programs. That is all very challenging indeed. But then the CFO must also serve as the ship’s scout—watching for key trends that are emerging or that have accelerated as a result of COVID-19, such as digitization and changes in consumer behavior.

The balance between opportunity and risk is being altered substantially for most companies. The CEO could be tempted to profit from immediate demands—“let’s make ventilators, let’s make disinfectants.” The CFO’s job, by contrast, is to point out the differences between quick-to-market options and long-term post-COVID-19 options. These post-COVID-19 options can be an important factor in motivating and engaging employees during these challenging times.

It is also important for the CFO to present the board with reports and pre-reads that paint the entire picture in an objective way, including potential scenarios for the future. That is the only way boards and senior management can take thoughtful and well-founded decisions—first for the recovery and then for a sustainable future for all stakeholders. The word “crisis” has two meanings, one being “danger” and the other being “chance.” Today’s CFO must consider both.

The word ‘crisis’ has two meanings, one being ‘danger’ and the other being ‘chance.’ Today’s CFO must consider both.

Shaping the general transformation agenda

Barbara Kux: Outside of crisis periods, studies by INSEAD and McKinsey show, boards spend more than two-thirds of their time on “housekeeping”—financial reporting, compliance, environment, health and safety issues, regulatory issues, and the like. Only about 20 percent is spent on strategy. It is very important for boards to get out of this “compliance cage,” as I call it, and really focus on sustainable value creation. I’m thinking of the board of a leading oil and gas company that did just that. It recognized the importance of sustainable business development early on. The company gained first-mover advantages by diversifying toward a green business, including investing in solar and battery technologies.

At the end of the day, the board is ultimately responsible for the strategy, and the CFO is best-positioned to support strategy discussions. The finance leader can serve as a neutral party among the members of the C-suite, synthesizing their transformation ideas, supplementing them with comprehensive quantitative and qualitative data, and then working with the CEO to bring it all back to the board. This is even more important today to respond to COVID-19–related challenges early on.

Rick Haythornthwaite: The biggest challenge for any CEO, CFO, or other senior leader is to institutionalize new ideas without sucking the life out of them. Each C-suite leader plays a different but important role in this regard. The CFO needs to give transformation initiatives structure and rigor, while the CEO is probably better suited to take on the motivational aspects—for instance, the context for change and definitions of success. The whole team creates the strategy map—the markets and products affected, changes in pricing, the execution plan. But the CFO needs to ensure that the financial and operational underpinnings are there. Even if they are not visible to every single part of the organization, the board can see them through the CFO.

‘Scouting for the future’

Barbara Kux: To serve as an effective scout, the CFO should establish nonfinancial KPIs, like net promoter and employee-engagement scores, that are critical for the future health and performance of the organization. CFOs should review the strategy process to see that risks and opportunities are being well-assessed. And they can raise the political antennae of the board—accessing global think tanks, for instance, to understand what’s going on in Washington, China, and other important regions or in the medical community. The CEO often is not the most long-term–focused person in the organization; we know this because our financial markets are still very much short-term oriented. The board has to be long-term oriented. The CFO, therefore, must maintain a good balance of both. That might mean introducing a lean-transformation program with a focus on short-term results while, at the same time, contributing to the definition and implementation of a sustainable strategy for the company to emerge strong from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rick Haythornthwaite: Boards need CEOs who can handle multiple truths, who can be expansive in thinking, and who can live comfortably in the future and bring the company along for the ride. The CFO also needs to be a protagonist in the boardroom, but from a different base: you can’t move to the future until you are anchored in the present. The CFO provides that anchor. Having a balance between future and present, between CEO and CFO, is important. The board wants to feel that there is strategic momentum—but also that the company is not just heading off on a journey of delusion.

Daring to dissent

Barbara Kux: It is important for the CEO and CFO to get on well, but their relationship should not be too close. It is better for the CFO to be objective, even if that sometimes leads to constructive conflicts. At times the CEO defaults to presenting only the positive in the boardroom, which makes it harder for the CFO to play back a more objective story. But that is very much the role of CFOs. They need to raise those early warnings. As a board director, I feel better if the CFO sometimes states, “by the way, we are losing market share here.” It takes a great deal of self-assurance for the CFO to come into the boardroom and say something like that. An independent-minded CFO will always be transparent with the board. A good CEO will always strive to establish an open relationship with the CFO. It is important for the board to motivate this constructive behavior from both executives so it can truly understand what is going well or not so well.

An independent-minded CFO will always be transparent with the board. A good CEO will always strive to establish an open relationship with the CFO.

Leading constructive dialogues

Rick Haythornthwaite: The senior-management team should not be delivering full solutions to the board at the outset; there should be a period of questions and discussion. The boardroom should be the place for CFOs and boards to engage in the cut and thrust of examination and exploration, with thoughtful planning and framing of dialogues to ensure that decision making is of the highest possible quality.

I’ll give you an example. CFOs used to be able to put traditional capital cases in front of the board about things like investments in plant and equipment, and there was typically a well-grooved dialogue. The kinds of actions they are talking about have changed, though. Think about companies’ investments in platform technologies, which can involve large sums being paid for targets with very low EBITDA—the idea being that value will ultimately come from the combination of entities rather than from a singular target.

Boards may be unfamiliar with such investment cases, so rather than jumping into quick, instinctive type-one decisions forced by the imposition of inappropriate and probably unnecessary time constraints, they will need an education. The board must take time to understand what, in practice, the acquisition of a platform would look like—how it might be scaled under new ownership, how that scaling would affect the bottom line, any risks involved, and so on. This is fundamentally a type-two decision, requiring time and deliberation. The CFO has an important role to play in making sure that this process happens, that it plays out over several board sessions rather than being squeezed into one meeting, and that conversations are grounded in hard numbers.

In the wake of COVID-19, of course, these dialogues may need to happen virtually; the quality of the conversation will still be good, as people are becoming accustomed to virtual meetings.2 They are fine for certain pro-forma tasks, where the issues are well-understood and processes are well-established. But when you’re trying to bring in new voices and new ideas, that’s when you need to be together in the same room.

Growing into the role of change agent

Barbara Kux: The role of the CFO is so much more expansive than it was even five years ago, including additional responsibility for cyber and digital transformations and for IT initiatives. To get your arms around the role and grow in it, take a step back and look at the company objectively. “What other roles could I play in the company, and how does that overlap with what I am doing now?” “Which initiatives would make the most impact in the company, and how could I realize quick wins in those areas?” Maybe it’s a focus on digital or compliance or export control or political intelligence. The CFO’s professional response to COVID-19 crisis management could be a springboard for future development. Whatever it is, I would identify it and just start. Take any kind of training you can get; read as many business publications as you can. Train yourself in how to deal with activist investors. Step by step, your hat will become bigger.

Rick Haythornthwaite: Whether you are talking about COVID-19 or digital disruption or any other impact on the business, please remember that the board still wants to sleep at night, and when the details are lost, the board will be much less forgiving of CFOs than of CEOs. Don’t forget that part of it. Particularly in this challenging economic environment, it is very important. Chairs and boards? We like to sleep soundly at night.

 

 

 

10 hospital deals called off, delayed

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-transactions-and-valuation/10-hospital-deals-called-off-delayed.html?utm_medium=email

Beaumont, Summa Health Delay Hospital Merger Until After COVID-19

Below are 10 hospital transactions or partnerships that have been delayed or called off since Jan. 1, beginning with the most recent:

1. Pandemic delays UMass Memorial’s acquisition of Harrington HealthCare
The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed back UMass Memorial Health Care’s acquisition of Harrington HealthCare, a Southbridge, Mass.-based system comprising a 119-bed hospital,  satellite location and three medical office buildings.

2. Jefferson Health, Temple call off cancer center deal
Thomas Jefferson University will no longer purchase the Fox Chase Cancer Center from Temple University due to the “devastating economic impact of COVID-19.”

3. St. Luke’s takeover of Kansas hospital pushed back amid COVID-19 crisis
The date that St. Luke’s Health System will take over Allen County Regional Hospital in Iola, Kan., has been pushed back due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

4. Astria Health cancels sale of hospitals as COVID-19 affects markets 
Yakima, Wash.-based Astria Health, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2019, has taken its hospitals off the market.

5. Beaumont, Summa Health delay merger
Southfield, Mich.-based Beaumont Health is delaying its merger with Akron, Ohio-based Summa Health due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Beaumont CEO John Fox said during a news briefing April 21.

6. North Carolina health systems call off partnership talks
Citing uncertainties brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, Greensboro, N.C.-based Cone Health has ended talks to become a successor to Asheboro, N.C.-based Randolph Health after Randolph emerges from bankruptcy.

7. New York hospital to split with Ascension after 18 years
St. Mary’s Healthcare in Amsterdam, N.Y., became an independent hospital after 18 years as a member of St. Louis-based Ascension.

8. Geisinger, AtlantiCare sever merger
Danville, Pa.-based Geisinger and Atlantic City, N.J.-based AtlantiCare have agreed to part ways, the two health systems announced March 31.

9. Home healthcare providers abandon $1.25B deal amid FTC probe 
Two home healthcare providers, Aveanna Healthcare and Maxim Healthcare Services, have terminated their proposed acquisition agreement, the Federal Trade Commission said.

10. FTC sues to block Jefferson Health-Einstein Healthcare merger
The Federal Trade Commission will sue to block the merger of Philadelphia-based Jefferson Health and Einstein Healthcare Network, a deal that has been pending since 2018. The commission said it will seek a temporary restraining order and a preliminary injunction to prevent the deal.

 

 

 

Five Healthcare Industry Changes to Watch in 2020

https://www.managedhealthcareexecutive.com/news/five-healthcare-industry-changes-watch-2020

Innovation

Industry experts expect significant changes to shake up the healthcare landscape in the next few years, which will affect both health insurers and providers. Many are the result of a shift toward value-based care, a move toward decreased care in hospital settings, technological advances, and other forces.

Here’s a look at what can payers and providers can expect to occur, why each change is occurring, and how payers and providers can prepare for each change:

1. A shift in healthcare delivery from hospital to ambulatory settings

Healthcare delivery will continue to move from inpatient to outpatient facilities. “More surgeries and diagnostic procedures that historically have required an inpatient hospital stay can now be performed more safely and efficiently in an outpatient setting,” says Stephen A. Timoni, JD, an attorney and partner at the law firm Lindabury, McCormick, Estabrook & Cooper, in Westfield, New Jersey, who represents healthcare providers in areas of reimbursement and managed care contracting. A growing volume of outpatient care will be provided in ambulatory surgery centers, primary care clinics, retail clinics, urgent care centers, nurse managed health centers, imaging facilities, emergency departments, retail clinics, and patients’ homes.

This change is occurring as the result of clinical innovations, patient preferences, financial incentives, electronic health records, telemedicine, and an increased focus on improving quality of care and clinical outcomes. “The upward trend in value-based payment models is also influencing this shift, with the goal of reducing the cost of care and improving the overall patient experience,” Timoni says.

Payers and providers can prepare for this shift by analyzing and forecasting the cost and reimbursement implications of providing care in outpatient settings compared to inpatient settings. They should continue to analyze changing patient demographics, consumer preferences, and satisfaction trends, Timoni says. Collecting and analyzing data regarding quality and clinical outcomes as the result of changes in delivery of care from inpatient to outpatient is also key. Healthcare providers should develop effective strategies to grow capacity and infrastructure for outpatient services and invest in innovative mobile technologies, diagnostic tools, and telemedicine systems.

2. Consolidation will continue industry wide

More healthcare entities will continue to merge together. “Even though the number of available partners for transactions is shrinking, new deals pop up all the time because smaller entities are being targeted or entities that had been holding out are now changing their position,” says Matthew Fisher, JD, partner and chair of the Health Law Group at Mirick O’Connell, a law firm in Westborough, Massachusetts. Increased consolidation will result in higher healthcare prices as larger sized institutions use their size to their advantage. Another impact will be narrowing the field of contracting options, which will result in greater dominance by fewer entities in a market.

This change is occurring because industry stakeholder believes that consolidation is the way to survive in a healthcare landscape still being shaped by the ACA. “The belief is that value-based care models require single unified entities as opposed to more contractual-based ventures to succeed,” Fisher says. Another factor is that momentum for consolidations across the industry has continued to build and no player wants to be left behind.

Along these lines, Timoni says that consolidation has been motivated by the evolving and challenging commercial and government reimbursement models which include lower fee-for-service payment rates, value-based payment components, and incentives to move care from inpatient to outpatient settings. “Basic economic theory suggests that consolidation of hospitals and physicians enables these combined providers to charge higher prices to private payers as the result of a lack of competition,” Timoni says. “Likewise, combined insurers are able to charge higher premiums to their subscribers.”

Payers and providers can prepare for this change by evaluating their operations and determining whether consolidation with another entity is advantageous. “This requires assessing an entity’s operations and the risks of consolidation,” Fisher says.

Timoni advises payers and providers to monitor the consolidation landscape and develop effective merger and acquisition strategies. These strategies should focus on optimizing economies of scale to reduce costs and finding the best partners to achieve improved quality of care and effectively manage population health.

3. Protecting data privacy

Ongoing attention will be given to protecting the privacy of healthcare data. New laws, at both the federal and state levels, will be considered that could introduce new regulatory requirements, Fisher says.

While a federal law in an election year may be doubtful, individual states are proceeding. The California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA), intended to enhance privacy rights and consumer protection, will become effective in 2020, for example. Even though the CCPA doesn’t cover all healthcare data, healthcare organizations will still collect additional information that could be subject to CCPA, which means more compliance obligations, Fisher says. Other states are considering how to jump on the privacy legislation bandwagon, which means that regulatory requirements will increase. “Even in the absence of legislation, payers and providers can expect individuals to assert concerns and use public pressure to drive increased attention to privacy issues,” Fisher says.

Meanwhile, debates around what is meant by privacy continue to evolve, Fisher continues. A backlash against the non-transparent sharing of healthcare data and arguable profiteering is creating anger among patients and other groups. Simultaneously, data breaches continue to be reported on a daily basis. Add in that healthcare is a prime target, and all of the factors point to healthcare needing to do more to protect data.

Payers and providers can embrace increased data privacy by focusing on existing compliance efforts, which will require taking time to better understanding HIPAA. “Ignoring or only making superficial efforts to respect data privacy is insufficient,” Fisher says. “Merely doing what is legally permissible may not be good enough.”

4. Consumerization of healthcare

As patients assume more financial responsibility for their healthcare costs due to higher premiums, co-pays, co-insurance, and deductibles, they have become more concerned with the value of the care they receive as well as cost. Patients will likely demand improved access to clearer benefits, billing, and network information to improve transparency, says Brooks Dexter, MBA, Los Angeles-based managing director and head of the healthcare M&A advisory practice at Duff & Phelps, a global consultancy firm.

“Healthcare providers must follow suit to meet value expectations and deliver more consumer-friendly services or may risk losing market share to innovative new healthcare arrangements, such as direct primary care, which offer convenient and quality care with simplified medical billing,” Dexter says. Some ways to do this are to offer better patient portals, expanded hours, improved access, and clear procedure pricing. Despite the trend, payers and providers will most likely continue to resist CMS’ efforts to force greater cost transparency by requiring hospitals to post payer-specific negotiated charges for common services that can be shopped.

Furthermore, Peter Manoogian, principal at ZS, a consulting firm focused on healthcare in Boston, says that the voices of older adults will become comparatively louder as this rapidly growing segment becomes more tech-savvy. The Trump Administration supports increased use of Medicare Advantage and expanding consumer choices. Plan options will reach a record high this year and create an unprecedented amount of choices for this population. The average number of plans a beneficiary has access to this year will be 28, up by a whopping 50% from 2017. What’s more, new entrants that boast a customer-driven approach such as Oscar Health are entering the fray in major markets such as New York and Houston.

Health plans need to be laser focused on improving their understanding and engagement of their customers—who are evolving themselves. “To stay ahead of the change, health plans need access to the right data coupled with leading-edge analytics and technology to continuously mine insights on what members are seeking in their healthcare experience, how patients and providers interact throughout their healthcare journey, and how to meet the needs of future healthcare customers,” Manoogian says.

Health plans will need to take more of a retail focus than what they’re accustomed to, Manoogian says. The bar for providing a great experience and retaining members will also increase.

5. More technological innovations will emerge

Technological innovation will continue to dramatically and rapidly change the manner in which healthcare is delivered, resulting in more personalized care, improved clinical outcomes and patient experience, and overall quality of life. “Information systems, mobile technology, high-tech digital devices, and electronic medical records will allow payers and providers to accurately measure clinical outcomes and effectively manage the continuum of medical care and their population’s overall health,” Timoni says.

One specific way that care will change is that providers will start seeing telehealth play a more critical role in care delivery as the brick-and-mortar, in-person care model becomes less common. “Telehealth will grow past a nice-to-have tool into a standard of care, particularly for low-risk and predictable appointments,” says Cindy Gaines, MSN, RN, clinical leader, Population Health Management, Philips, a company focused on transforming care through collaborative health management in Alpharetta, Georgia. This transformation will enable providers to better tailor their care to patients’ unique needs, while increasing patient autonomy and engagement.

Technological innovations are occurring due to booming private sector interest and investment in medical technology innovation. “Patients are demanding real-time health information, personalized medicine, higher quality of care, and convenient treatment options,” Timoni says. “Payers are demanding more detailed and expansive outcomes data to scientifically manage the reimbursement system to lower costs and improve their subscribers’ health. The medical and information technology fields are attracting more high-skilled workers, who will continue to drive innovation to new levels as long as investor interest is sustained.”

Regarding the increased use of telehealth, Gaines says that many appointments that occur in a hospital today can take place outside of the hospital. And, as the healthcare industry increasingly moves toward value-based care, providers need to extend their line-of-sight outside of a hospital’s four walls. For example, a low-risk follow-up appointment after an operation is usually mostly dialogue and has a predictable outcome—it could be conducted electronically. “By filling up hospitals with visits that could occur virtually, it makes it harder for patients who need face-to-face healthcare access to get it,” she says.

A lack of insurance coverage is a major impediment to telehealth adoption for most health systems. Therefore, providers should pair guaranteed reimbursement opportunities with change management workflows to advance these efforts, Gaines says. They would also be smart to leverage their patients’ everyday devices to manage their care, whether it’s on their smart phone, a fitness watch, or voice assistant.

To embrace technological innovation, payers and providers must continue to be educated and aware of the expanding medical technology landscape and develop technology investment and deployment strategies. “Consider investing and participating in technology venture capital funds and partnering with private sector technology manufacturers and research institutions,” Timoni says.

 

 

 

TOP 6 HEALTHCARE MERGERS OF 2019

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/finance/top-6-healthcare-mergers-2019?spMailingID=16768251&spUserID=MTg2ODM1MDE3NTU1S0&spJobID=1781800057&spReportId=MTc4MTgwMDA1NwS2

M&A activity continued to thrive among insurers and providers in 2019.

As was the case in 2018, the healthcare industry saw several megamergers occur in 2019.

Healthcare leaders pointed to industry consolidation as the year’s top priority, according to a Definitive Healthcare survey, with different reasons for pursuing mergers.

Related: Top 5 Healthcare Mergers of 2018

Providers sought to achieve scale in order to address staffing shortages while insurers looked to respond to the increasing influence of consumerism in healthcare.

While some mergers fell through, many organizations announced or finalized deals during the course of the year.

Below are six major healthcare mergers that were announced or completed in 2019.

1. CVS-AETNA

The nearly $70 billion megamerger received final judicial approval in September after an extended review by U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon.

The merger originally received approval from the Department of Justice in October 2018 but was subject to questions and criticisms by numerous stakeholders.

The deal was marked by scrutiny over vertical mergers, with Leon noting that his approval shouldn’t be seen as a rubber stamp.

 

2. CENTENE-WELLCARE

Centene Corp. announced a $17.3 billion merger with WellCare Health Plans in March, a move seen as doubling down on the marketplaces established by the Affordable Care Act.

The merged company will be based in St. Louis and encompass 22 million members, $97 billion in revenues, and $5 billion in EBITDA for 2019.

The pending transaction has already received regulatory approval from 25 states.

Earlier this month, Centene agreed to sell its subsidiary IlliniCare Health to CVS Health, including its Medicaid and Medicare Advantage plans in Illinois.

3. DIGNITY-CHI

Dignity Health and Catholic Health Initiatives finalized a $29 billion megamerger between the two Catholic health systems in February.

Renamed as “CommonSpirit,” the Chicago–based health system has a footprint in 21 states, with more than 700 care sites and 142 hospitals.

In November, the system released its Q1 2020 financials highlighted by $7.1 billion in revenues and a net loss of $227 million.

 

4. HARVARD PILGRIM-TUFTS

Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and Tufts Health Plan announced an intention to merge in August, potentially serving nearly 2.4 million plan members across New England.

As part of the proposed deal, Tufts CEO Tom Croswell would serve as CEO of the merged company while Harvard Pilgrim CEO Michael Carson would serve as president.

The two Massachusetts-based insurers told The Boston Globe earlier this month that the merger would benefit consumers with more affordable health coverage.

 

5. TOTAL HEALTH CARE-PRIORITY HEALTH

Total Health Care and Priority Health received final regulatory approval from the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) in late November.

The two Michigan-based healthcare organizations, which announced plans to merge in late August, plan to complete the deal by the end of 2019.

Prior to receiving approval from state regulators, Total Health Care members approved the merger earlier this fall.

As part of the merger, the two Michigan-based healthcare organizations will also be establishing a $25 million foundation to improve health outcomes in Detroit.

 

6. DARTMOUTH-HITCHCOCK-GRANITEONE HEALTH

Two New Hampshire-based health systems agreed to merge nine months after signing a letter of intent to merge.

The new merged system will be renamed “Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health GraniteOne” and includes Catholic Medical Center in Manchester.

Both organizations will maintain their locations and local leadership as part of the deal.

 

 

 

5 trends and issues to watch in the insurance industry in 2020

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/top-5-trends-and-issues-to-watch-insurance-industry-2020

Image result for 5 trends and issues to watch in the insurance industry in 2020

The insurance industry appears likely to have another big year in 2020, as growth in government and commercial markets is expected to continue.

But a presidential election and new transparency initiatives could throw some major curveballs to payers.

Here are the top five issues and trends to watch out for in the next year:

Medicare Advantage diversifies

Enrollment growth in Medicare Advantage is likely to continue next year, as more than 22 million Medicare beneficiaries already have a plan. But what will be different is diversification into new populations, especially as insurers pursue dually eligible beneficiaries on both Medicare and Medicaid.

“This is being made possible because of strong support from government,” said Dan Mendelson, founder of consulting firm Avalere Health.

Support for Medicare Advantage “transcends partisanship and that has been true under Trump and Obama,” he added.

New benefit designs, such as paying for food or transportation to address social determinants of health, are also going to increase in popularity. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has made it easier for plans to offer such supplemental benefits.

Get ready for transparency, whether you like it or not

This past year saw CMS release a major rule on transparency that forces hospitals to post payer-negotiated rates starting in 2021 for more than 300 “shoppable” hospital services.

The rule, which is being contested in court, could fundamentally change how insurers negotiate with hospitals on how to cover those services. The rule brings up questions about revealing “private information for the sake of transparency,” said Monica Hon, vice president for consulting firm Advis.

But it remains unclear how the court battle over the rule, which has garnered opposition from not just hospitals but also insurers, will play out. Hospital groups behind the lawsuit challenging the rule have had success getting favorable rulings that struck down payment cuts.

“I think there is going to be a lot of back and forth,” Hon said. “Whatever the result is that will impact how payers and providers negotiate rates with this transparency rule.”

Don’t expect major rules in 2020

2020 is a presidential and congressional election year, and traditionally few major initiatives get going in Congress. But experts say the same goes for regulations as administrations tend not to issue major regulations in the run-up to the vote in November, said Ben Isgur, leader of PwC’s Health Research Institute.

“What we will end up with is much more change on regulations on the state side,” Isgur said.

But new regulations on proposals that have been floated could be released. Chief among them could be a final rule to halt information blocking at hospitals and a new regulation on tying Medicare Part B prices for certain drugs to the prices paid in certain countries.

Congressional lawmakers are still hoping to reach a compromise on surprise billing, but they don’t have much time before campaigning for reelection in November.

A lot of the healthcare direction will be set after the presidential election in November. If a Democrat defeats President Donald Trump, then waivers for items like Medicaid work requirements and block grants will likely go by the wayside.

“Depending on who takes the White House and Congress, are we going to further repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it or will we have Medicare for All,” Isgur said.

Insurers continue to go vertical in dealmaking

Insurers certainly weren’t shy about engaging in mergers and acquisitions in 2019, and that trend doesn’t appear likely to dissipate next year.

But the types of mergers might be different. Insurers and providers are increasingly looking at deals that would offer a vertical integration, such as acquiring more pharmacy services or a technology company to enhance the patient experience. Plenty of big-ticket vertical deals, such as CVS’ acquisition of Aetna and Cigna’s purchase of Express Scripts, have changed the industry landscape significantly.

“Deals in 2020 are going to be much more around the identity,” Isgur said. “Five years ago we had a lot of horizontal deals where health systems got bigger and regional payers got bigger.”

Payers continue to push patients away from hospitals

Insurers are going to try to find new ways to push patients toward outpatient services to avoid higher costs from going to a hospital.

For instance, “we are seeing a lot of payers not going to honor hospital imaging,” said Hon. “A lot of payers are saying we want you to go outside the hospital and that is a lot cheaper for us,” she said.

Instead, payers will try to steer patients toward imaging centers or physicians’ offices.

“We are seeing that with imaging and free-standing surgical centers now being able to do a lot more,” she added.

Insurers are also starting to use primary care more proactively to “ensure that they understand the needs of the patient, their needs are being addressed,” Mendelson said.

 

 

 

10 Health Care Trends To Watch In 2020

https://blog.providence.org/news/10-health-care-trends-to-watch-in-2020?_ga=2.242868994.1447754200.1576610293-1113187070.1573499391

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With 2020 shaping up to be another big year for health care, executives at Providence, one of the largest health systems in the country, today released their annual New Year’s predictions.

External forces will continue to bear down on health care, Providence leaders said. Politics, technology, social issues, labor shortages and heightened consumer expectations will all play a role. As a result, providers will feel more intense pressure to accelerate the transformation of health care.

“The question is whether providers can pivot fast enough,” said Rod Hochman, M.D., president and CEO of Providence. “In 2020, health systems that can get ahead of the major trends will be best positioned to meet the future needs of their communities.”

What can you expect next year? Here are Providence’s top 10 predictions.

  1. The value of health system consolidation will come to fruition in the form of large scale improvements in clinical quality and outcomes.

One of the most important reasons health systems have consolidated in recent years is to improve clinical quality and spread best practice across scale. Because clinical integration takes time, this will be the year that significant results begin coming to fruition. For example, Providence has leveraged its seven-state system to reverse the alarming national rise in U.S. mothers dying in childbirth. Thanks to collaboration among its clinical teams, Providence is one of the safest places for moms to give birth, having nearly eliminated preventable maternal deaths over the last three years. At the same time, Providence has reduced the cost of caring for moms covered by Medicaid, as well as the cost of NICU care. Expect more examples of improved outcomes and costs to emerge in 2020 as proven practices in other clinical areas begin bearing fruit on a large scale.

  1. Corporate social responsibility will take on a bigger role in tackling homelessness, suicide, the opioid crisis and other social issues that affect health.  

More companies will partner with health systems, government agencies, social services and other nonprofits to take action on the social determinants of health. Be Well OC is one example of the type of coalition that will make a significant impact in 2020. The public-private partnership in Orange County, Calif., brings diverse organizations together to meet the urgent need for mental health and addiction services in the community. Meanwhile, in cities like Seattle, Wash., health systems like Providence are partnering with the business community and other not-for-profits to address the growing homelessness epidemic.

  1. Personalized medicine and population health, two seemingly opposite approaches to health care, will begin working hand in hand to improve outcomes in the U.S.

The path to a healthier nation will be accelerated by treating both the unique needs of the individual down to the DNA level, as well as common issues shared by people in similar demographics. Health systems like Providence, for example, are using genomics to pinpoint a person’s biologic age, as well as tailor medical interventions to the individual. At the same time, Providence is coordinating care and resources across broad segments of people through steps such as cancer screenings and improving access to housing and nutrition. Combining the power of these two disciplines will help catapult the health of the nation.

  1. Health systems will prioritize digital access to care, convenience and personalization to compete with disruptors and collaborate with big tech.

Delivering same-day access to care – how, when and where people want it – will be a burning priority for health systems in 2020. New entrants will continue to disrupt the space and raise consumer expectations. Leading health systems like Providence will stay ahead of the curve with digital platforms that integrate telehealth, its in-store clinics at Walgreens and its vast network of specialty, primary care and urgent care clinics across the Western U.S. To help patients navigate these care options, Providence will also continue to develop its artificial intelligence capability, making its AI bot, “Grace,” more pervasive, helpful and capable. Providence will also continue to engage patients between episodes of care by providing personalized content and services to keep them healthy while developing a long-term, digitally engaged relationship with patients.

  1. As more health systems partner with tech companies to bring health care into the digital age, patients will count on providers to serve as the guardians of their personal health information. 

Machine learning and artificial intelligence will raise the potential for new breakthroughs in medicine and care delivery, and data will be key to this level of innovation. But whether tech companies are prioritizing the best interest of patients will remain a lingering question for the American public. Patients will look to providers to be their voice and advocates when it comes to protecting their health information. Expect providers to stand up for data privacy and security and take the lead in ensuring data is used responsibly for the common good.

  1. The race to bring voice-activated technology to health care will heat up and will be a central feature in the hospital and clinic of the future.

Just as Alexa and Siri are transforming the way we live our personal lives, voice and natural language processing are the future of health care. Expect innovation to accelerate around smart clinics and hospitals that make it easier for clinicians to treat and care for patients.  Voice commands that process and analyze information will support clinical decision making at the bedside and the exam room. As part of a new partnership between Providence and Microsoft to build the “care site of the future,” clinical communications and voice-activated technology will be a central feature.

  1. Simplifying the electronic medical record will become a rallying cry for clinicians.

With burnout on the rise among physicians, nurses and other caregivers, reducing the time it takes to chart in the electronic medical record will be key to improving the work environment for clinicians. Shifting the national conversation from EMR “interoperability” to “usability” will take on greater urgency. A simplified, more intuitive EMR means clinicians can spend less time on the computer and more time focused directly on patients, creating a better experience for clinicians and the patients they serve.

  1. The health care workforce will continue to evolve and adopt new skill sets. At the same time, talent shortages will become more pronounced.

As the sector changes at a rapid pace, the health care workforce will need to add new skill sets to keep up with innovations in medicine and care delivery. Clinicians will also need to become more proficient in managing the social determinants of health and caring for the whole person, not just physically, but also mentally and emotionally. Health systems will seek to stay competitive in a tough labor market by offering attractive pay and benefit packages. A commitment to investing in education and career development, as well as creating engaging work environments, will also be a key focus for retaining and recruiting top talent.

  1. Price transparency will remain a hot issue. But the focus needs to shift to giving patients the information they want most: what their out-of-pocket costs will be.   

Patients deserve to know what their health care costs will be up front, so they can make informed decisions as they shop for care. Rather than inundating them with a deluge of prices and negotiated rates for hundreds of services that may or may not be relevant to their personal situation, more emphasis needs to be placed on helping them understand what their specific out-of-pocket costs will be. The amount individuals pay is typically based on their insurance coverage. That’s why health systems like Providence are actively developing price estimator tools and self-service portals, based on blockchain and AI technology, to help patients more quickly and easily access this information.

  1. New alternatives to “Medicare for All” will emerge in the presidential debates. One viable option that should be taken seriously: free primary care for every American.

In the 2020 elections, concerns will be raised over whether Americans will lose their private commercial or employer-sponsored insurance under a Medicare for All plan. A new campaign platform — free primary care for all — should be considered as a more effective, affordable alternative. By guaranteeing access to primary care, the nation can focus on prevention, chronic disease management and helping Americans live their healthiest life possible. Providence is participating in the current administration’s innovative primary care pilots, which are showing positive results in terms of better outcomes and reduced costs.

 

 

 

 

Health insurers stable, M&A seen diminishing in 2020: Fitch

https://www.healthcaredive.com/news/health-insurers-stable-ma-seen-diminishing-in-2020-fitch/568859/

Dive Brief:

  • The outlook for the health insurance sector remains stable heading into 2020, Fitch Ratings reports.
  • The ratings agency maintains a stable outlook on the “vast majority” of the companies it rates within the U.S. health insurance industry, which includes UnitedHealth Group and Aetna.
  • The insurance sector continues to benefit from “low unemployment, manageable medical cost trend and solid growth in government-funded business,” Brad Ellis, senior director for Fitch, said in the report.

Dive Insight:

Even anticipating an increase in the growth of U.S. health expenditures, Fitch expects insurers to deliver solid operating results, including improved medical loss ratios, for 2020.

There is even a chance for insurers to garner positive ratings outlooks as many look to continue to execute on merger integration and deleveraging, according to Fitch.

Thanks in part to the return of the health insurance fee, Fitch expects medical loss ratios to drop to 82.5% in 2020. A decrease from the expected 83.9% for the full year of 2019 for the nation’s eight largest publicly traded insurers, which cover about 165 million people, according to Fitch.

MLR is an important measure, showing the amount an insurer spends on medical claims as a percentage of premiums. Lower MLRs leave more room for covering administration costs and garnering profit.

Even an upcoming election year and a slate of Democratic presidential hopefuls touting support to expand Medicare, the agency does not expect seismic changes to the system.

“Healthcare will certainly continue to be one of the most prevalent discussion topics among candidates for the U.S. presidency in 2020, but Fitch does not anticipate significant change in the structure of the U.S. healthcare system over the next couple of years,” the report said.

The agency also said it expects major mergers to slow significantly in 2020. The insurance sector has experienced significant M&A activity over the last few years, including CVS Health’s buy of Aetna and Cigna’s acquisition of Express ScriptsCentene is near closing on its purchase of rival WellCare.

Fitch expects consolidation activity next year to focus more on “modest build-out of care delivery opportunities in various regions or care management and technology initiatives.”