14 health systems with strong finances

14 health systems with strong finances

Hospital Mergers, Acquisitions, and Affiliations | Case Study – RMS

Here are 14 health systems with strong operational metrics and solid financial positions, according to reports from Fitch Ratings, Moody’s Investors Service and S&P Global Ratings.

1. St. Louis-based Ascension has an “AA+” rating and stable outlook with Fitch and an “Aa2” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. The system has a strong financial profile and a significant presence in several key markets, Fitch said. The credit rating agency expects Ascension will continue to produce healthy operating margins. 

2. Charlotte, N.C.-based Atrium Health has an “Aa3” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s and an “AA-” rating and stable outlook with S&P. Atrium and Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Wake Forest Baptist Health merged in October. The addition of the Winston-Salem service area and Wake Forest Baptist’s academic and research programs enhance Atrium’s position within the highly competitive North Carolina healthcare market, S&P said. 

3. Phoenix-based Banner Health has an “AA-” rating and stable outlook with Fitch and S&P. Banner’s financial profile is strong, even taking into consideration the market volatility that occurred in the first quarter of 2020, Fitch said. The credit rating agency expects the system to continue to improve operating margins and to generate cash flow sufficient to sustain strong key financial metrics. 

4. Dallas- based Baylor Scott & White Health has an “Aa3” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. The system has strong liquidity and is the largest nonprofit health system in Texas, Moody’s said. The credit rating agency expects Baylor Scott & White Health to continue to benefit from its centralized operating model, proven ability to execute complex strategies and well-developed planning abilities. 

5. Newark, Del.-based ChristianaCare Health System has an “Aa2” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. The health system has extensive clinical depth and includes Delaware’s largest teaching hospital, Moody’s said. The system’s strong market position will help it resume near pre-pandemic level margins in fiscal year 2021, according to Moody’s. 

6. Falls Church, Va.-based Inova Health System has an “Aa2” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. The system has a strong financial profile, and Moody’s expects Inova’s balance sheet to remain exceptionally strong. 

7. Philadelphia-based Main Line Health has an “AA” rating and stable outlook with Fitch. The credit rating agency expects the system’s operations to recover after the COVID-19 pandemic and for it to resume its track record of strong operating cash flow margins. 

8. Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic has an “Aa2” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. The system has an excellent reputation and generates strong patient demand at its academic medical centers in Minnesota, Arizona and Florida, Moody’s said. The credit rating agency said strong patient demand and proactive expense control measures would likely fuel good results for Mayo for the fiscal year that ended Dec. 31.

9. Midland-based MidMichigan Health has an “AA-” rating and stable outlook with Fitch. The system generated healthy operational levels through fiscal year 2020, and Fitch expects it to continue generating strong cash flow. 

10. Chicago-based Northwestern Memorial HealthCare has an “Aa2” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. The health system had strong pre-COVID margins and liquidity, Moody’s said. The credit rating agency expects the system to maintain strong operating cash flow margins. 

11. Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Novant Health has an “AA-” rating and stable outlook with Fitch. The system has strong margins and each of its markets have met or exceeded budgeted expectations over the past four years, Fitch said.  

12. Albuquerque, N.M.-based Presbyterian Healthcare Services has an “AA” rating and stable outlook with Fitch. The health system has a strong financial profile and a leading market position in Albuquerque and throughout New Mexico, Fitch said. The credit rating agency said it believes Presbyterian Healthcare Services is more resilient to pandemic disruptions than most other hospital systems. 

13. Renton, Wash.-based Providence has an “Aa3” rating and stable outlook with Moody’s. Providence has a large revenue base and a leading market share in most of its markets, according to Moody’s. The credit rating agency expects the system’s operations to improve this year. 

14. Livonia, Mich.-based Trinity Health has an “AA-” rating and stable outlook with Fitch. The rating is driven by Trinity’s national size and scale, with significant market presence in several states, Fitch said. The credit rating agency expects the system’s operating margins to improve in the long term. 

Genesis Healthcare warns of possible bankruptcy

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/genesis-healthcare-warns-of-possible-bankruptcy.html?utm_medium=email

News

Kennett Square, Pa.-based Genesis Healthcare, one of the largest post-acute care providers in the U.S., warned that bankruptcy is possible if its financial losses continue. 

“The virus continues to have a significant adverse impact on the company’s revenues and expenses, particularly in hard-hit Mid Atlantic and Northeastern markets,” Genesis CEO George V. Hager Jr., said in a Nov. 9 earnings release.

Mr. Hager said government stimulus funds the company received in the third quarter of this year fell nearly $60 million short of the company’s COVID-19 costs and lost revenue. 

Genesis said it has taken several steps to help offset the financial damage linked to the pandemic, including delaying payment of a portion of payroll taxes incurred through December. 

But the company warned that bankruptcy is possible if its financial losses continue. 

“Even if the company receives additional funding support from government sources and/or is able to execute successfully all of its these plans and initiatives, given the unpredictable nature of, and the operating challenges presented by, the COVID-19 virus, the company’s operating plans and resulting cash flows, along with its cash and cash equivalents and other sources of liquidity. may not be sufficient to fund operations for the 12-month period following the date the financial statements are issued,” Genesis said. “Such events or circumstances could force the company to seek reorganization under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.”

Genesis ended the third quarter of this year with a net loss of $62.8 million, compared to net income of $46.1 million in the same period a year earlier. 

11 hospitals laying off workers

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/11-hospitals-laying-off-workers-110920.html?utm_medium=email

Layoffs costing hundreds of people their jobs in NC but notices don't  capture true scope of cuts | WRAL TechWire

The financial challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have forced hundreds of hospitals across the nation to furlough, lay off or reduce pay for workers, and others have had to scale back services or close. 

Lower patient volumes, canceled elective procedures and higher expenses tied to the pandemic have created a cash crunch for hospitals. U.S. hospitals are estimated to lose more than $323 billion this year, according to a report from the American Hospital Association. The total includes $120.5 billion in financial losses the AHA predicts hospitals will see from July to December. 

Hospitals are taking a number of steps to offset financial damage. Executives, clinicians and other staff are taking pay cuts, capital projects are being put on hold, and some employees are losing their jobs. More than 260 hospitals and health systems furloughed workers this year and dozens of others have implemented layoffs. 

Below are 11 hospitals and health systems that announced layoffs since Sept. 1, most of which were attributed to financial strain caused by the pandemic. 

1. NorthBay Healthcare, a nonprofit health system based in Fairfield, Calif., is laying off 31 of its 2,863 employees as part of its pandemic recovery plan, the system announced Nov. 2. 

2. Minneapolis-based Children’s Minnesota is laying off 150 employees, or about 3 percent of its workforce. Children’s Minnesota cited several reasons for the layoffs, including the financial hit from the COVID-19 pandemic. Affected employees will end their employment either Dec. 31 or March 31.

3. Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric and addiction treatment hospital in Vermont, notified 85 employees in late October that they would be laid off within 60 days. 

4. Citing a need to offset financial losses, Minneapolis-based M Health Fairview said it plans to downsize its hospital and clinic operations. As a result of the changes, 900 employees, about 3 percent of its 34,000-person workforce, will be laid off.

5. Lake Charles (La.) Memorial Health System laid off 205 workers, or about 8 percent of its workforce, as a result of damage sustained from Hurricane Laura. The health system laid off employees at Moss Memorial Health Clinic and the Archer Institute, two facilities in Lake Charles that sustained damage from the hurricane.

6. Burlington, Mass.-based Wellforce laid off 232 employees as a result of operating losses linked to the COVID-19 pandemic. The health system, comprising Tufts Medical Center, Lowell General Hospital and MelroseWakefield Healthcare, experienced a drastic drop in patient volume earlier this year due to the suspension of outpatient visits and elective surgeries. In the nine months ended June 30, the health system reported a $32.2 million operating loss. 

7. Baptist Health Floyd in New Albany, Ind., part of Louisville, Ky.-based Baptist Health, eliminated 36 positions. The hospital said the cuts, which primarily affected administrative and nonclinical roles, are due to restructuring that is “necessary to meet financial challenges compounded by COVID-19.”

8. Cincinnati-based UC Health laid off about 100 employees. The job cuts affected both clinical and non-clinical staff. A spokesperson for the health system said no physicians were laid off. 

9. Mercy Iowa City (Iowa) announced in September that it will lay off 29 employees to address financial strain tied to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

10. Springfield, Ill.-based Memorial Health System laid off 143 employees, or about 1.5 percent of the five-hospital system’s workforce. The health system cited financial pressures tied to the pandemic as the reason for the layoffs. 

11. Watertown, N.Y.-based Samaritan Health announced Sept. 8 that it laid off 51 employees and will make other cost-cutting moves to offset financial stress tied to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Bringing bots into the health system

https://mailchi.mp/95e826d2e3bc/the-weekly-gist-august-28-2020?e=d1e747d2d8

Robotic Process Automation – Everything You Need to Know - Part 1 -  ITChronicles

This week we hosted a member webinar on an application of artificial intelligence (AI) that’s generating a lot of buzz these days in healthcare—robotic process automation (RPA).

That bit of tech jargon translates to finding repetitive, often error-prone tasks performed by human staff, and implementing “bots” to perform them instead. The benefit? Fewer mistakes, the ability to redeploy talent to less “mindless” work (often with the unexpected benefit of improving employee engagement), and the potential to capture substantial efficiencies. That last feature makes RPA especially attractive in the current environment, in which systems are looking for any assistance in lowering operating expenses. 

Typical processes where RPA can be used to augment human staff include revenue cycle tasks like managing prior authorization, simplifying claims processing, and coordinating patient scheduling. Indeed, the health insurance industry is far ahead of the provider community in implementing these machine-driven approaches to productivity improvement.

We heard early “lessons learned” from one member system, Fountain Valley, CA-based MemorialCare, who’s been working with Columbus, OH-based Olive.ai, which bills itself as the only “AI as a service” platform built exclusively for healthcare.

Listening to their story, we were particularly struck by the fact that RPA is far more than “just” another IT project with an established start and finish, but rather an ongoing strategic effort. MemorialCare has been particularly thoughtful about involving senior leaders in finance, operations, and HR in identifying and implementing their RPA strategy, making sure that cross-functional leaders are “joined at the hip” to manage what could prove to be a truly revolutionary technology.

Having identified scores of potential applications for RPA, they’re taking a deliberate approach to rollout for the first dozen or so applications. One critical step: ensuring that processes are “optimized” (via lean or other process improvement approaches) before they are “automated”. MemorialCare views RPA implementation as an opportunity to catalyze the organization for change—“It’s not often that one solution can help push the entire system forward,” in the words of one senior system executive.

We’ll be keeping an eye on this burgeoning space for interesting applications, as health systems identify new ways to deploy “the bots” across the enterprise.

 

 

 

 

2020 Hospital Operating Margins Down 96% Through July

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/2020-hospital-operating-margins-down-96-through-july-301116888.html

Ship in a Storm | ICOExaminer

Hospital Operating Margins have plunged 96% since the start of 2020 in comparison with the first seven months of 2019, according to a new Kaufman Hall report, as uncertainty and volatility continue in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Those results do not include federal funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Even with that aid, however, Operating Margins are down 28% year-to-date compared to January-July 2019.

Operating Margins fell 2% year-over-year in July without the CARES Act relief, according to the latest edition of Kaufman Hall’s National Hospital Flash Report. Hospitals also saw flat year-over-year gross revenue performance in July, continued high per-patient expenses, and a fifth consecutive month of volumes falling below 2019 performance and below budget.

From June to July, however, hospital Operating Margins were up 24%, likely due to a backlog in demand resulting from the shutdown of many non-urgent services in the early months of the pandemic.

“COVID-19 has created a highly volatile operating environment for our nation’s hospitals and health systems,” said Jim Blake, managing director, Kaufman Hall. “Hospitals have shown some incremental signs of potential financial recovery in recent months. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee these trends will continue, and hospitals still have a long way to go to recover from devastating losses in the early months of the pandemic.”

July volumes continued to fall year-over-year, but showed some signs of potential recovery month-over-month. Adjusted Discharges were down 7% compared to July 2019, but up 6% compared to June 2020. Adjusted Patient Days were down 4% year-over-year, but up 7% month-over-month. Adjusted Discharges are down 13% and Adjusted Patient Days are down 11% since the start of 2020, compared to the first seven months of 2019.

Hospital Emergency Department (ED) volumes have been hardest hit, falling 17% year-to-date compared to the same period in 2019, down 17% year-over-year, and 13% below budget in July. Surgery volumes saw some gains with the continued resumption of non-urgent procedures pushing Operating Room Minutes up 3% month-over-month and 4% above budget in July, but they remain down 15% year-to-date.

Not including CARES Act relief, Gross Operating Revenues were essentially flat year-over-year and 2% below budget for the month, but have fallen 8% year-to-date compared to the same period in 2019. Inpatient Revenue is down 5% year-to-date and fell 3% below budget in July, but increased 1% year-over-year. Outpatient Revenue is down 11% year-to-date, 1% year-over-year, and 2% below budget.

Hospitals nationwide also continued to see higher per-patient expenses despite having fewer patients. Total Expense per Adjusted Discharge has jumped 16% year-to-date compared to the same seven-month period in 2019, and rose 9% year-over-year and 5% above budget in July. Labor Expense per Adjusted Discharge is up 18% year-to-date and rose 9% year-over-year and 5% above budget in July. Non-Labor Expense per Adjusted Discharge has increased 15% during the first seven months of 2020 and jumped 11% year-over-year and was 5% above budget for the month.

The National Hospital Flash Report draws on data from more than 800 hospitals.

 

 

 

 

AdventHealth posts $799M operating loss in Q2

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AdventHealth Acquires Top Cardiovascular Surgical Group - Orlando ...

AdventHealth, a 46-hospital system based in Altamonte Springs, Fla., reported a decline in revenue in the second quarter of this year and ended the period with an operating loss, according to recently released unaudited financial documents

The health system reported revenues of $2.8 billion in the three months ended June 30, down from $2.9 billion in the same period a year earlier. The decline was attributed to lower patient volumes from mid-March through early May. On a same-facility basis, hospital admissions were down 29 percent year over year in April, and surgical volumes were down 66 percent.

Expenses climbed 2.8 percent year over year, and AdventHealth ended the second quarter of this year with an operating loss of $799 million. In the same period a year earlier, the system posted operating income of $190.9 million.

After factoring in nonoperating items, including a $291.8 million gain on investments, the system reported net income of $290.8 million in the second quarter of 2020. In the same period last year, the system posted net income of $372.8 million.

Looking at the first six months of this year, AdventHealth reported a net loss of $287.7 million on revenues of $5.8 billion. That’s compared to the first half of 2019, when the system recorded net income of $865 million on revenues of $5.9 billion.

 

 

 

Sutter posts $857M loss in H1 on investment, operational declines

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California's Sutter Health reaps rewards from investments in ...

Dive Brief:

  • Sutter Health had a staggering loss of $857 million in the first half of the year as the Northern California health was bruised by the pandemic. That’s almost a $1.4 billion drop in income compared to the first half of last year, a plummet Sutter management largely blamed on investment and operational losses in its latest financial filing posted Thursday.
  • The virus shuttered operations for a period of time, driving Sutter’s revenue down 8% to $6.1 billion during the first half of the year. Expenses climbed nearly 2%, contributing to an operating loss of $557 million.
  • Still, the nonprofit noted it did experience a significant rebound in its investments in the second quarter after weathering the devastating effects of the first quarter.

Dive Insight:

Sutter joins other major nonprofit health systems in posting net losses for the first half of the year despite receiving hundreds of millions in federal grants to help offset headwinds brought on by the pandemic.

Recently, both Renton, Washington-based Providence and Arizona-based Banner Health posted losses for the first half of the year — $538 million and $267 million, respectively. Dampened revenue and downturns in investments contributed to their losses.

The federal government has funneled billions of dollars to providers across the country in an attempt to help them weather the downturn in patient volumes. Sutter noted in its filing that it’s received $400 million in federal relief funds so far, though that wasn’t enough to push the health system back into the black. Sutter operates 29 hospitals and enjoys a large presence in Northern California.

Sutter reported fewer admissions and emergency room visits in the second quarter compared to the prior-year period, down about 10% and 19%, respectively.

The pandemic was quick to wreak havoc on Sutter’s finances during the first quarter, in which the system reported an operating loss of $236 million and a net loss of almost $1.1 billion.

The coronavirus is also serving as a drag on its ratings. In April, two of the three big ratings agencies downgraded Sutter Health’s rating.

In part, Moody’s attributed the downgrade to Sutter’s weaker profitability profile. In its rationale, Moody’s said, “Following a second year of weaker results, margins in 2020 are likely to remain under pressure due to COVID-19 related disruptions, ongoing performance challenges at some of Sutter’s facilities, and continued reimbursement pressure.”

Also weighing on Moody’s rating is the $575 million settlement expected to be paid this year to resolve antitrust issues. Last year, the health system averted a trial over antitrust concerns after agreeing to a settlement with California regulators. Sutter agreed it would end any contracts that require all of its facilities to be in-network or none of them and cap out-of-network charges, among other stipulations.

 

 

 

 

Revenues and volumes have fallen ‘off a cliff’ hospital executives tell American Hospital Association

https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/aha-releases-case-studies-us-hospitals-and-health-systems-highlighting-financial-challenges

Revenues and volumes have fallen 'off a cliff' hospital executives ...

Eight health systems in AHA case study are asking Congress for more relief funding.

The American Hospital Association has released eight case studies from hospitals and health systems across the country that highlight how systems of different shapes and sizes are reacting to the financial challenges posed by COVID-19.

The case studies include Kindred Healthcare and TIRR Memorial Hermann in Houston; AdventHealth Central Florida Division in Orlando, Florida; the Loretto Hospital in Chicago; Kittitas Valley Healthcare in Ellensburg, Washington; Washington Regional Medical Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas; Banner Health in Phoenix; UR Medicine Thompson Health in Canandaigua, New York; and the Queen’s Health Systems and the Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu.

Across the board, every case study revealed that hospitals and health systems are asking Congress for more relief funding.

“We are begging for more assistance and more help because we can’t keep moving forward,” said Michael Stapleton, the president and CEO of UR Medicine Thompson Health in New York.

WHAT’S THE IMPACT?

In Texas, the state with the third most COVID-19 cases, Kindred Healthcare and TIRR Memorial Hermann have begun to rely on inpatient rehabilitation facilities and long-term acute care hospitals to treat COVID-19-positive and medically complex recovering COVID-19 patients.

“In particular, as communities and hospitals struggled to meet ICU capacity needs, these hospitals stepped forward to take care of COVID-19-positive patients and others to help provide beds for more COVID-19-positive patients,” the case study said.

However, even with assistance from local facilities, post-acute care providers have incurred increased costs to prepare for and treat COVID-19-positive patients and complex post-COVID-19 patients.

“When you look at lost revenue and volumes, and the additional costs of ramping up to prepare for COVID-19, whether it’s personal protective equipment, respiratory systems, medications or facility infrastructure changes, there are significant dollars associated with that,” said Jerry Ashworth, the senior vice president and CEO at TIRR Memorial Hermann.

AdventHealth in Florida has taken financial hits from declining elective procedures and purchasing personal protective equipment. The company says it has lost $263 million since the start of the pandemic and has spent $254 million sourcing PPE.

“Florida is in the middle of the crisis,” said Todd Goodman, division chief financial officer of AdventHealth. “Our current COVID numbers are four times higher than the peak that we had back in April. We are bringing in higher-priced nurses and staff from other parts of the nation, because of a rapid increase in inpatient census. We are in a different place today than we were even six weeks ago.”

COVID-19 has disproportionately affected communities of color across the country, but especially in Chicago, where 30% of the population is Black. Forty-six percent of all COVID-19 cases and 57% of all deaths are Black people.

Despite having 70% of its admissions being related to COVID-19, the Loretto Hospital in Chicago has not received any funds from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act hot spot distribution.

“Our COVID-19 unit is full and has been for the last three months; we’re now at 296 COVID-19 patients [on July 16] and yet we’ve not received any of the COVID-19 high impact ‘hot spot’ payments,” said George Miller, the president and CEO of the Loretto Hospital. “We got the Small Business Administration loan to help keep our team members employed.”

Kittitas Valley Healthcare in Washington was among the first in the country to feel the impact of COVID-19. The rural delivery system and its critical access hospital postponed elective surgeries and many other nonessential services in response.

“Our revenues and volumes fell off a cliff,” said Julie Petersen, the CEO of Kittitas Valley Healthcare. “Our orthopedics programs, our GI [gastrointestinal] programs and cataract surgeries evaporated.”

Now, the hospital is off its original 2020 net revenue projections by $8.4 million.

After seeing a 12% rise in COVID-19 cases over a two-week period in Fayetteville, Arkansas, the Washington Regional Medical Center had 96% of its 40 intensive care unit beds occupied, a 20-bed COVID-19 ICU was completely full, and 298 of the facility’s 315 adult beds were occupied.

Taking care of these patients put the health system in a financial crisis. Its net patient revenue declined by $14 million in April. It furloughed 350 of its 3,300 employees and reduced the hours of 360 full-time workers, according to Larry Shackelford, the president and CEO of Washington Regional Medical Center.

On July 12, Banner Health in Arizona had more than 1,500 inpatients who either tested COVID-positive or are suspected of having COVID-19, representing 45% of the COVID-19 inpatient hospitalizations in the state, according to Dr. Marjorie Bessel, the chief clinical officer at Banner Health.

Banner expects operating losses of $500 million for 2020, compared to its initial expectations, with expected revenue losses approaching $1 billion for the year, according to the case study.

By mid-March, New York had 15 times more COVID-19 cases than any other state, according to the case study. Like the rest of the state, UR Medicine Thompson Health shut down many of its services, resulting in “insurmountable” financial losses and staff furloughs.

“Our first projection was a $17 million loss through the year-end,” Stapleton said. “We lost half of March, all of April and half of May. The hospital has received only $3.1 million from the CARES Act tranche payments.”

Although the Queen’s Health Systems and the Queen’s Medical Center in Hawaii are starting to reschedule appointments, surgeries and procedures that had been delayed by COVID-19, patients aren’t coming back as anticipated.

Even with the pent-up demand for elective procedures, minimally invasive and even short-stay procedures are still down by about 18%. We are seeing our in-person clinic visits down by about 14%, and the emergency department (ED) is the one that surprised us the most – down by 38%,” said Jason Chang, president of the Queen’s Medical Center and chief operating officer of the Queen’s Health Systems and the Queen’s Medical Center.

The systems lost $127 million between March and May, according to Chang. He says the projected losses are about $60 million for 2021, but could reach $300 million if Hawaii experiences a second wave of COVID-19.

THE LARGER TREND

The AHA has cited $323 billion in losses industry-wide due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, with U.S. hospitals anticipating about $120 billion in losses from July to December alone.

It was joined by the American Nurses Association and the American Medical Association to ask Congress to provide additional funding to the original $100 billion from the CARES Act. In a letter sent in July, the organizations asked for “at least an additional $100 billion to the emergency relief fund to provide direct funding to front line health care personnel and providers, including nurses, doctors, hospitals and health systems, to continue to respond to this pandemic.”

 

 

 

 

Providence posts $538M loss, lays out 3-part strategic plan

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/providence-posts-538m-loss-lays-out-3-part-strategic-plan.html?utm_medium=email

Providence St. Joseph Health Consolidates 14 Hospitals in SoCal ...

Providence, a 51-hospital system based in Renton Wash., received $651 million in federal grants in the first half of this year, but it wasn’t enough to offset the system’s losses tied to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The health system reported revenues of $12.5 billion in the first six months of this year, down from $12.6 billion in the same period a year earlier, according to financial documents released Aug. 17. Though the health system reported a rebound in patient volumes after the suspension of non-emergency procedures in March and April, net patient service revenue was down 10 percent year over year.

Providence’s expenses also increased. For the first two quarters of this year, the health system reported operating expenses of $12.7 billion, up 3 percent year over year. The increase was attributed to higher labor costs and increased personal protective equipment and pharmaceutical spend.

Reduced patient volumes combined with increased costs drove an operating loss of $221 million in the first half of this year. In the first half of 2019, Providence reported operating income of $250 million.

After factoring in nonoperating items, Providence ended the first six months of 2020 with a net loss of $538 million, compared to net income of $985 million in the same period of 2019.

To help offset financial damage, Providence received $651 million in federal grants made available under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. 

“We knew we were in for a marathon the moment we admitted our first patient with COVID-19 seven months ago,” Providence President and CEO Rod Hochman, MD, said in an earnings release. “Our caregivers have been on the front lines ever since, and we are incredibly proud and grateful for all they are doing to serve our communities during the greatest crisis of our lifetime.”

In its earnings release, Providence mapped out a three-part plan for the future. As part of that plan, the system said it is focused on improving testing capacity and turnaround times and advancing clinical research and best practices in the treatment of COVID-19. The system is also revising its operating model and cost structure. 

 

 

Cash-Pinched Hospitals Press Congress to Break Virus Fund Logjam

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/health-law-and-business/cash-pinched-hospitals-press-congress-to-break-virus-fund-logjam

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Hospital groups are pressing Congress to put more money into a relief fund for hospitals and providers, even as labor data showed signs of a turnaround for the health-care industry last month.

Congressional leaders are at a standstill over the next coronavirus-relief package and it could be weeks until lawmakers vote on legislation. Hospital groups have said the $175 billion Congress already approved has been a crucial lifeline to keep hospitals from laying off more staff or potentially closing. Some are worried the money may start to run dry soon.

The coronavirus is prompting many Americans to delay health care, and further funding delays exacerbate the need for assistance, the hospitals warn. Some providers that shed jobs earlier in the pandemic have begun adding them back, but employment levels remain far below where they once were.

“The longer we are in the pandemic the more clear it becomes that this is not going to be a short-term issue,” Beth Feldpush, senior vice president of policy and advocacy at America’s Essential Hospitals, said.

Leaders of both parties back more federal funding to help hospitals and doctors’ offices stay in business. Democrats proposed $100 billion for the industry, as hospital groups such as AEH sought, in virus-relief legislation (H.R. 6800) the House passed earlier this year. Republicans included $25 billion in their counterproposal.

The Health and Human Services Department has promised about $115 billion of the $175 billion in relief Congress approved this year to help health-care providers offset their Covid-19-related losses, according to agency data. That leaves the industry with about $60 billion left.

The U.S. exceeded 5 million confirmed Covid-19 cases Aug. 9, according to data from Bloomberg News and Johns Hopkins University, more than any other country. Almost 165,000 people in the U.S. have died from the virus.

Industry Impact

The health-care industry added more than 126,000 jobs in July, according to data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Dentist offices and hospitals, the section of the industry that was laying off tens of thousands of people in April and May, accounted for more than 70,000 of those new jobs.

Still, there were 797,000 fewer health-care jobs compared to before the pandemic, according to BLS.

The virus hit parts of the heath-care industry unevenly. Large health systems such as HCA Healthcare Inc. and Universal Health Services Inc. posted better-than-expected profits for the second quarter of 2020.

Some hospitals that didn’t have much cash-on-hand to start the year are struggling with lower profits and may need added relief if the virus continues to keep Americans from seeking care, industry watchers said.

“No hospital is going to come out of this year better than they were in prior years,” Suzie Desai, senior director for S&P Global Rating’s Not-for-Profit Health Care group, said.

The federal relief funds helped buoy hospitals this year, hospital groups argue. The American Hospital Association estimates that without relief funds, hospitals margins would have been down 15% and could be down 11% at the end of 2020 if the virus continues to spread at its current pace.

The AHA estimated losses for the nation’s hospitals and health systems will reach $323 billion this year.