Gainesville health system paying patients’ out-of-network costs

https://www.albanyherald.com/news/gainesville-health-system-paying-patients-out-of-network-costs/article_5a82d58a-f4f1-11e9-b7b5-8bebc4253708.html

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With a contract impasse in its third week, a Gainesville-based health system is spending millions of dollars so that thousands of patients are not having to pay more when visiting the system’s doctors and hospitals.

Northeast Georgia Health System’s contract with Anthem ended Sept. 30, which means that since then, Georgians with Anthem insurance have been out of network for NGHS facilities and physicians.

But in an unusual move, the Northeast Georgia system is making up the financial difference between in-network and out-of-network prices through Dec. 31. That way, Anthem patients won’t pay higher fees when visiting NGHS medical providers, the system said.

“While it will cost millions of dollars per month to protect our patients from out-of-network costs, we’d rather do that than agree to a proposal that would jeopardize the health of our community for years to come,’’ Steve McNeilly, vice president of managed care for NGHS, said.

Most contract disputes between health systems and insurers get resolved before the end of the previous deal, although some agreements come just hours before the end of the expiring pact. The terminated contract between NGHS and Anthem is an exception, and this particular stalemate doesn’t show any sign of progress. Neither side has mentioned any negotiations or even indicated that talks are being scheduled.

The standoff comes at a time when many Georgians are entering their open enrollment period for the 2020 health plan year.

Anthem is by far the state’s biggest health insurer. Northeast Georgia’s hospitals in Gainesville, Braselton, Winder and Dahlonega, as well as its urgent care facilities and many physician group locations, are now out of network for Anthem patients.

“Anthem has only contacted NGHS once since the end of September – and that was only to inform us that they would be processing all claims as out-of-network,’’ McNeilly said. He said Northeast Georgia has proposed a contract with concessions, but that Anthem “refuses to take any meaningful action.’’

“Unfortunately, it appears that Anthem intends for us to be out of network for an extended period of time, so we’re urging patients to switch to a different health insurance plan during open enrollment,’’ McNeilly added.

Northeast Georgia said patients can call its Patient Access Service Center at (770) 219-7678 to get a personalized estimate of hospital charges for upcoming surgeries or procedures. If patients have questions about charges for physician office visits, they can call their physician’s office for more information, NGHS said.

Anthem said Monday that it is “standing firm for our consumers who need greater affordability.’’

The latest proposals from NGHS would increase costs “well above other health systems in the state,’’ Christina Gaines, an Anthem spokeswoman, said. “These increases place a significant burden on consumers because any substantial price increase in the services at these facilities would be directly reflected in increases in medical expenses covered by employer-sponsored group health plans, as well as to member premiums and cost share amounts.’’

What NGHS proposed “was simply not sustainable’’ for Anthem members, she said.

“We provided a revised proposal to them two days before the contract expired and did not receive a response,’’ Gaines said. “We are willing to resume talks so we can come to a new agreement that is fair, provides flexibility and protects affordability.”

Anthem said it can’t guarantee that Northeast Georgia will continue to charge patients the same rates as under the previous contract.

“To protect against unexpected balance billing, and other expenses associated with out-of-network providers, we are urging members to use in-network physicians and facilities,’’ Gaines said. “Anthem continues to have a broad, statewide provider network that delivers access to other quality health care options that remain in-network for our consumers.” Anthem directed consumers to visit www.anthem.com/nghs for information.

Craig Savage, a consultant with CMBC Advisors in North Carolina, said he had not heard previously of a hospital-based system covering the cost gap for patients who are forced out of network by a contract dispute.

“I think it’s a demonstration of good faith to patients,’’ Savage said. “It puts a little marketing pressure on Anthem.’’

But he added that even losing the business of 40,000 patients is “not going to have a huge [financial] impact on Anthem in Georgia.’’

And Savage said the contract standoff may put pressure on local physicians who could lose many patients to another insurer during open enrollment season.

 

 

 

UnitedHealthcare’s policy will limit outpatient surgery payments to hospitals

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/unitedhealthcare-s-policy-will-limit-outpatient-surgery-payments-to-hospitals.html?oly_enc_id=2893H2397267F7G

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UnitedHealthcare has expanded prior authorization requirements and site of service medical necessity reviews for certain surgeries in an effort to shift surgical procedures to less expensive locations, according to Modern Healthcare.

The outpatient surgery policy will limit the circumstances under which UnitedHealthcare will pay for certain surgeries in a hospital outpatient setting.

Taking effect in November for fully insured groups in most states, UnitedHealthcare will only pay for a surgical procedure performed in an outpatient hospital setting if the insurer determines the site of service for the procedure is medically necessary, UnitedHealthcare told Becker’s Hospital Review.

“Medical necessity reviews for site of service occur during our prior authorization process and are only conducted if the surgical procedure will be performed in an outpatient hospital setting,” UnitedHealthcare said. “We utilize our Outpatient Surgical Procedures – Site of Service Utilization Review Guideline to help make our site of service medical necessity determinations. Site of service medical necessity reviews are currently being conducted for certain surgical procedures and will apply to additional surgical procedures beginning on Nov. 1, 2019 for most states.”

In California, Colorado, Connecticut, New Jersey and New York, medical necessity reviews will begin for certain surgeries occurring on or after Dec. 1, according to a UnitedHealthcare bulletin. Site of service medical necessity reviews do not apply to providers in Alaska, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland and Texas.  

With the outpatient surgery policy, the insurer said it hopes to reduce healthcare spending by guiding patients toward ambulatory surgery centers, where care may be cheaper when there isn’t a substantial medical reason for the surgery to be performed in a hospital outpatient setting.

On same day of hospital concentration study, AMA says payers are the ones with less competition

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/payer-issues/on-same-day-of-hospital-concentration-study-ama-says-payers-are-the-ones-with-less-competition.html?oly_enc_id=2893H2397267F7G

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In 2018, 75 percent of commercial health insurance markets were highly concentrated, according to a study published by the American Medical Association.

For its study, AMA analyzed market concentration in 382 metropolitan areas across the nation. AMA estimated that 73 million Americans with commercial health plans live in highly concentrated markets and don’t have many health plans to choose from. 

“Americans in three-quarters of commercial health insurance markets have a limited number of health insurers from which to choose,” AMA President Patrice Harris, MD, said in a prepared statement. “In almost half of metropolitan areas, a single health insurer has 50 percent or more of the market, and patients are not benefiting from this degree of market power. While health insurers grow corporate profits, networks are too narrow, premiums are too high, and benefits are too watered down.”

The study was published the same day the Health Care Cost Institute published an analysis finding a growing number of metropolitan areas have highly concentrated hospital markets. HCCI found that by 2016, hospital markets in the majority (72 percent) of 112 metro areas the institute studied were highly concentrated. HCCI said this “reflects the fact that most metros became increasingly concentrated over time.”

Read the full AMA study here.

 

Rate of uninsured people increases for first time since ACA rolled out

https://www.axios.com/uninsured-rate-increases-first-time-since-obamacare-ec6dbd6d-fffc-446d-be4c-02bed0d3ea3e.html

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Roughly 27.5 million people, or 8.5% of the U.S. population, had no health insurance at some point in 2018, according to new figures from the Census Bureau.

Why it matters: Last year’s uninsured rate increased from 7.9% in 2017 — the first time the uninsured rate has gone up since the Affordable Care Act has been in effect.

Between the lines: The uninsured population does not include the “underinsured,” or people who have medical coverage but face prohibitively high deductibles and out-of-pocket costs.

  • The figure also does not include people who have short-term plans, association plans and religious-based sharing ministries — policies the Trump administration has promoted, but that have holes in coverage that could leave people on the hook for high costs.

The intrigue: The type of coverage that witnessed the largest decline in 2018 was Medicaid, which fell 0.7 percentage points.

  • 4 states where the uninsured rate had a statistically significant increase were Alabama, Idaho, Tennessee and Texas, all of which have not fully expanded Medicaid under the ACA.

The bottom line: The uninsured rate is still markedly lower before the ACA became law, but it’s an odd paradox to see more people lose health coverage even though the economy created more jobs.

 

 

Insurers often shrug off fraud

https://www.axios.com/health-insurance-fraud-costs-enrollees-employers-74ad83f1-39d7-461e-9485-726676fd327f.html

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Fighting fraud “is not a top priority” for major insurers, ProPublica reports, because they can just pass along the cost of wasteful spending to enrollees and employers.

Why it matters: Experts say fraud likely accounts for 10% of U.S. health costs. However, “private health insurers, who preside over some $1.2 trillion in spending each year, exhibit a puzzling lack of ambition when it comes to bringing fraudsters to justice,” ProPublica’s Marshall Allen writes.

Case in point: In California’s 14 largest counties, which cover 80% of the state’s population, prosecutors filed charges in only 22 fraud cases referred by a commercial insurer in 2017 and 2018 combined.

  • Investigating fraud can be costly for insurers — both financially and in terms of their relationships with providers.

Go deeper, via ProPublica: How to Make Health Insurers Take Fraud Seriously