What the 2016 presidential election could mean for the future of the ACA

http://www.healthcaredive.com/news/2016-president-election-ACA-future-healthcare/429843/

At the federal level, the nation’s two major political parties have vastly different visions for the future of healthcare. The election will help to determine which course the nation follows for the foreseeable future. What are the likely outcomes depending on who wins the presidency?

4 Tips for Keeping Politics Out of Staff Conversations

http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/hr/4-tips-keeping-politics-out-staff-conversations?spMailingID=9754012&spUserID=MTMyMzQyMDQxMTkyS0&spJobID=1021982472&spReportId=MTAyMTk4MjQ3MgS2

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Avoiding divisive topics can help maintain workplace morale during a contentious election season—and afterward.

Clinton vs. Trump: 5 critical election issues

http://managedhealthcareexecutive.modernmedicine.com/managed-healthcare-executive/news/hillary-vs-trump-5-critical-election-issues?cfcache=true&ampGUID=A13E56ED-9529-4BD1-98E9-318F5373C18F&rememberme=1&ts=25102016

While Hillary Clinton vows to forge ahead with Obamacare if she is elected president, Donald Trump would scrap it altogether. The end results would be two very different forms of healthcare, and industry leaders have much to consider.

Brill“Many different factors are weighing on managed care executives such as the costs of pharmaceuticals, diagnostics and devices; the impact of consolidation amongst hospitals, physicians, health plans; and the losses in the exchange marketplace,” says Managed Healthcare Executive editorial advisor Joel V. Brill, MD, chief medical officer, Predictive Health, LLC, which partners with stakeholders to improve coverage of value-driven care. “With each of these factors, plans can, at least at a high level, make some educated guesses about the relative risk of each factor and impact to the bottom line.”

The election results, however, are much less certain, which from a risk perspective, weighs heavily on the minds of healthcare executives, Brill says. “How can you plan for business knowing that whatever you are doing currently could be upended in the beginning of November?”

To help provide some clarity, Managed Healthcare Executive identified five of the top industry issues, reviewed the candidates’ platforms for each, and asked industry experts to weigh in.

How Health Care Battles of the Past Shape the Candidates’ Positions Today

http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/in-brief/2016/oct/past-as-prologue-presidential-politics-health-policy?omnicid=EALERT1108988&mid=henrykotula@yahoo.com

Despite the singular nature of this year’s presidential campaign, there is plenty of continuity with past elections when it comes to health care, argue David Blumenthal, M.D., and James A. Morone in their New England Journal of Medicine “Perspective.”

In “Past as Prologue—Presidential Politics and Health Policy,” Blumenthal, The Commonwealth Fund’s president, and Morone, director of Brown University’s Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy, discuss the “deep underlying political forces and historical experiences with health care politics and policy” that are reflected in the platforms of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

The authors previously collaborated on the book The Heart of Power: Health and Politics in the Oval Office (University of California Press, 2009).

Snapshot of Where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump Stand on Seven Health Care Issues

http://kff.org/health-reform/issue-brief/snapshot-of-where-hillary-clinton-and-donald-trump-stand-on-seven-health-care-issues/?utm_campaign=KFF-2016-Sept-26-Election&utm_medium=email&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9LQIYS_jbmE-7bSR-9OJ5j8bcLOxpwmQjxdA5BMQaZpKDwNdSW3C_alw5pVX4qIlkQukuaRDBf4bl6OubNyZnr59Vv0Q&_hsmi=34870819&utm_content=34870819&utm_source=hs_email&hsCtaTracking=a146ead5-560b-4ebb-a5b5-ca9dc88b26eb%7C6f623259-cea8-4a30-a594-245783466739

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While health care has not been central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have laid out different approaches to addressing these and other health care issues. Central among these is their position on the future of the ACA. Hillary Clinton would maintain the ACA, and many of her policy proposals would build on provisions already in place. Donald Trump, in contrast, would fully repeal the ACA, and although his policy proposals and positions do not offer a full replacement plan, they do reflect an approach based on free market principles.

See where the candidates stand on seven key health policy issues.

Hillary Clinton’s Health Care Reform Proposals: Anticipated Effects on Insurance Coverage, Out-of-Pocket Costs, and the Federal Deficit

http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Publications/Issue-Briefs/2016/Sep/Clinton-Presidential-Health-Care-Proposal

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Issue: Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has proposed modifications to the Affordable Care Act to limit consumers’ out-of-pocket health spending.

Goal: We analyzed four of these policies—cost-sharing tax credits to offset spending above 5 percent of income; reduced premium contributions for marketplace enrollees; a fix to the ACA’s “family glitch,” which leaves some families with expensive employer coverage; and the introduction of a public option on the marketplaces.

Methods: RAND’s COMPARE microsimulation model.

Key findings and conclusions: These policies would increase the number of insured individuals by 400,000 to 9.6 million, and decrease consumers’ health spending relative to current law. Cost-sharing tax credits have the biggest effect—increasing coverage by 9.6 million and decreasing average spending by up to 33 percent for those with moderately low incomes. However, the policies with the largest coverage gains also increase the federal deficit, with impacts ranging from –$0.7 billion to $90 billion.

Donald Trump’s Health Care Reform Proposals: Anticipated Effects on Insurance Coverage, Out-of-Pocket Costs, and the Federal Deficit

http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Publications/Issue-Briefs/2016/Sep/Trump-Presidential-Health-Care-Proposal

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Issue: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has proposed to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and replace it with a proposal titled “Healthcare Reform to Make America Great Again.” Proposed reforms include allowing individuals to deduct the full amount of premiums for individual health plans from their federal tax returns, providing block grants to finance state Medicaid programs, and allowing insurers to sell insurance across state lines.

Goal: To assess how each of these reforms, when implemented individually, would affect insurance coverage, consumer out-of-pocket spending on health care, and the federal deficit in 2018.

Methods: RAND’s COMPARE microsimulation model.

Key findings and conclusions: The policies would increase the number of uninsured individuals by 16 million to 25 million relative to the ACA. Coverage losses disproportionately affect low-income individuals and those in poor health. Enrollees with individual market insurance would face higher out-of-pocket spending than under current law. Because the proposed reforms do not replace the ACA’s financing mechanisms, they would increase the federal deficit by $0.5 billion to $41 billion.

The Health Care Reform Proposals of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/blog/2016/trump-clinton-presidential-health-care-proposals?utm_medium=Facebook&utm_campaign=Health+Coverage&utm_source=Candidates+Blog

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As president, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump would take the nation down distinctly different paths on health care. In this post, we summarize the health reform proposals of each candidate, and—drawing on new estimates by Christine Eibner and colleagues at RAND Health—compare the proposals’ implications for the total number of people with insurance coverage, people’s out-of-pocket health care costs, and the federal budget.

RAND’s analysis is based on publicly available health care proposals on the candidates’ websites. Where these proposals lacked sufficient clarity for modeling, RAND sought additional information from the campaigns. When answers were not forthcoming, or did not fully resolve questions, RAND made reasonable assumptions that were reviewed and critiqued by independent experts. RAND modeled only those proposals for which it had adequate detail and technical capacity.

The Starting Point

As a starting point, Clinton and Trump propose dramatically different approaches to the Affordable Care Act (ACA): Clinton would maintain the ACA and Trump would repeal it. In estimating the impact of Trump’s proposal, RAND assumes a full repeal of the law including insurance subsidies, expanded eligibility for Medicaid, and individual market reforms such as bans against preexisting condition exclusions. RAND also assumes that repeal would eliminate the ACA’s financing mechanisms such as its Medicare payment reforms and taxes on health plans and medical devices. Consequently, RAND estimates that compared to maintaining the ACA as is, repeal would cause nearly 20 million people to lose their insurance in 2018, increase average premium and out-of-pocket costs for people who buy insurance on their own, and increase the federal deficit. Trump’s repeal of the ACA would increase the federal deficit because the loss of savings from the law’s Medicare reforms and revenues from fees and taxes would be greater than savings from the elimination of insurance subsidies and the Medicaid expansion.

Candidates Decry High Drug Prices, But They Have Few Options For Voters

Candidates Decry High Drug Prices, But They Have Few Options For Voters

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In this year’s presidential campaign, health care has taken a back seat. But one issue appears to be breaking through: the rising cost of prescription drugs.

The blockbuster drugs to treat hepatitis C as well as dramatic price increases on older drugs, most recently the EpiPen allergy treatment, have combined to put the issue back on the front burner.

Democrat Hillary Clinton just issued a lengthy proposal to address what her campaign calls “unjustified price hikes for long-available drugs.” That’s in addition to a broader proposal to address high drug prices the campaign put out last fall.

Republican Donald Trump, meanwhile, has said little about health care since announcing his candidacy in 2015, but he has several times called for a change in law to allowMedicare to negotiate drug prices for the population it serves.

Here are five reasons why this issue is back — and why it is so difficult to solve.

This is how the presidential election is shaping the ongoing drug price debate

This is how the presidential election is shaping the ongoing drug price debate

Change Capsule Pill Filled with Word on Balls

In this year’s presidential campaign, health care has taken a back seat. But one issue appears to be breaking through: the rising cost of prescription drugs.

The blockbuster drugs to treat hepatitis C as well as dramatic price increases on older drugs, most recently the EpiPen allergy treatment, have combined to put the issue back on the front burner.

Democrat Hillary Clinton just issued a lengthy proposal to address what her campaign calls “unjustified price hikes for long-available drugs.” That’s in addition to a broader proposal to address high drug prices the campaign put out last fall.
Republican Donald Trump, meanwhile, has said little about health care since announcing his candidacy in 2015, but he has several times called for a change in law to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices for the population it serves.

Here are five reasons why this issue is back — and why it is so difficult to solve.