Walgreens settles False Claims suits for $270 million

https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/walgreens-settles-false-claims-suits-270-million?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiT0RrNVpXSmpZV1UzTTJVdyIsInQiOiJNNFh6MElhd0lmVE5Zc09kZTl5d3BPc1h3ZkRpZGNIbWhHSE9RNVp5NkN1MFwvXC9kK3h6WHh5KzRHTWdsQTlWZ203aitRRnhUYWZ5QTVScVZcL01HaTkyUm5LNDRvanVuY0NUdVN4Y0czMzRkMzdNZzMrdVp6WjlmV2N5WHYxMEkrNCJ9

Two cases emerged from whistleblower claims about improper billing related to discounted drug prices and insulin pens.

Pharmacy giant Walgreens will pay nearly $270 million dollars as part of two major settlements, one that alleged the company had improperly billed federal healthcare programs for insulin pens it distributed to beneficiaries who didn’t need them and another that alleged Walgreens failed to disclose and charge lower drug prices offered through a discount program.

Both settlements were approved in mid-January and unsealed Tuesday. Walgreens must pay the United States and state governments a total of $269.2 million. Both cases arose from lawsuits filed by whistleblowers under the False Claims Act. Walgreens did not admit any wrongdoing as part of either settlement.

THE IMPACT

The DOJ said as a result of the conduct alleged in both cases, federal programs were inappropriately taxed. The alleged inappropriate disbursement of insulin resulted in the waste of valuable medication and created the potential for misuse “such as the improper resale of insulin pens on the Internet.” Because the company did properly disclose its discounted drug prices, federal healthcare programs paid out higher reimbursements than were actually warranted.

MORE ON THE CASES

The first settlement resolved allegations that Walgreens improperly billed Medicare and other federal healthcare programs for “hundreds of thousands” of insulin pens dispensed to beneficiaries who didn’t need them. According to a statement from the Department of Justice, it was alleged that Walgreens programmed its electronic pharmacy management system to prevent its pharmacists from dispensing less than a full box of five insulin pens, whether the patient needed that amount or not. It also said Walgreens falsely stated that they had not exceeded limits set on total days of supply in its reimbursement claims. This settlement totaled $209.2 million.

In this case, the DOJ said Walgreens admitted that when a federal health program denied a claim because the reported days of supply for a full carton of five insulin pens exceeded the federal program’s days-of-supply limit, the company dispensed and billed for the full carton and reduced the reported days of supply to conform to the program’s days-of-supply limit. Walgreens also admitted that it “repeatedly” reported days-of-supply data to federal health programs that differed from the days-of-supply calculated according to the standard pharmacy billing formula.

The company will pay $60 million as part of a second settlement to resolve allegations it overbilled Medicaid by failing to disclose and charge Medicaid the lower drug prices that it offered the public through a discount program called the Prescription Savings Club. Legally, the company must seek reimbursement only for the “the lowest of certain drug price points, including the ‘usual and customary price'” namely the price offered through such programs as the PSC. Those prices were not disclosed, causing overpayment from Medicaid to Walgreens, the DOJ said. The agency also said that Walgreens admitted it did not identify its PSC program prices as its U&C prices for the drugs on the PSC program formulary, resulting in overpayments.

ON THE RECORD

“Walgreens is pleased to have resolved these matters with the Department of Justice. The company fully cooperated with the government and has admitted no wrongdoing. Walgreens is a company of pharmacists living and working in the communities we serve, and we have always taken the safety and reliability of the medicines our patients need very seriously. We are resolving these matters because we believe it is in the best interest of our customers, patients and other stakeholders to move forward…In relation to these matters, Walgreens has entered into a Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA) with the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services. The CIA builds upon the company’s already existing comprehensive compliance program,” Walgreens said in a statement.

“In both settlements, Walgreens admitted and accepted responsibility for conduct the Government alleged in its complaints under the False Claims Act,” the DOJ said in a statement.

The Disappearing Doctor: How Mega-Mergers Are Changing the Business of Medical Care

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Is the doctor in?

In this new medical age of urgent care centers and retail clinics, that’s not a simple question. Nor does it have a simple answer, as primary care doctors become increasingly scarce.

“You call the doctor’s office to book an appointment,” said Matt Feit, a 45-year-old screenwriter in Los Angeles who visited an urgent care center eight times last year. “They’re only open Monday through Friday from these hours to those hours, and, generally, they’re not the hours I’m free or I have to take time off from my job.

“I can go just about anytime to urgent care,” he continued, “and my co-pay is exactly the same as if I went to my primary doctor.”

That’s one reason big players like CVS Health, the drugstore chain, and most recently Walmart, the giant retailer, are eyeing deals with Aetna and Humana, respectively, to use their stores to deliver medical care.

People are flocking to retail clinics and urgent care centers in strip malls or shopping centers, where simple health needs can usually be tended to by health professionals like nurse practitioners or physician assistants much more cheaply than in a doctor’s office. Some 12,000 are already scattered across the country, according to Merchant Medicine, a consulting firm.

On the other side, office visits to primary care doctors declined 18 percent from 2012 to 2016, even as visits to specialists increased, insurance data analyzed by the Health Care Cost Institute shows.

There’s little doubt that the front line of medicine — the traditional family or primary care doctor — has been under siege for years. Long hours and low pay have transformed pediatric or family practices into unattractive options for many aspiring physicians.

And the relationship between patients and doctors has radically changed. Apart from true emergency situations, patients’ expectations now reflect the larger 24/7 insta-culture of wanting everything now. When Dr. Carl Olden began watching patients turn to urgent care centers opening around him in Yakima, Wash., he and his partners decided to fight back.

They set up similar clinics three years ago, including one right across the street from their main office in a shopping center.

The practice not only was able to retain its patients, but then could access electronic health records for those off-site visits, avoiding a bad drug interaction or other problems, said Dr. Olden, who has been a doctor for 34 years.

“And we’ve had some folks come into the clinics who don’t have their own primary care physicians,” he said. “So we’ve been able to move them into our practice.”

By opening clinics to compete with urgent care centers, Dr. Carl Olden’s practice in Yakima, Wash., was able to retain its patients and move some walk-ins into the fold.
Merger Maneuvers

The new deals involving major corporations loom over doctors’ livelihoods, intensifying pressure on small practices and pushing them closer to extinction.

The latest involves Walmart and Humana, a large insurer with a sizable business offering private Medicare plans. While their talks are in the early stages, one potential partnership being discussed would center on using the retailer’s stores and expanding its existing 19 clinics for one-stop medical care. Walmart stores already offer pharmacy services and attract older people.

In addition, the proposed $69 billion merger between CVS Health, which operates 1,100 MinuteClinics, and Aetna, the giant insurer, would expand the customer bases of both. The deal is viewed as a direct response to moves by a rival insurer, UnitedHealth Group, which employs more than 30,000 physicians and operates one of the country’s largest urgent-care groups, MedExpress, as well as a big chain of free-standing surgery centers.

While both CVS and UnitedHealth have large pharmacy benefits businesses that would reap considerable rewards from the stream of prescriptions generated by the doctors at these facilities, the companies are also intent on managing what type of care patients get and where they go for it. And the wealth of data mined from consolidation would provide the companies with a map for steering people one way or another.

On top of these corporate partnerships, Amazon, JP Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway decided to join forces to develop some sort of health care strategy for their employees, expressing frustration with the current state of medical care. Their announcement, and Amazon’s recent forays into these fields, are rattling everyone from major hospital networks to pharmacists.

Doctors, too, are watching the evolution warily.

“With all of these deals, there is so much we don’t know,” said Dr. Michael Munger, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. “Are Aetna patients going to be mandated to go to a CVS MinuteClinic?”

Dr. Susan Kressly, a pediatrician in Warrington, Pa., has watched patients leave. Parents who once brought their children to her to treat an ear infection or check for strep, services whose profits helped offset some of the treatments she offered, are now visiting the retail clinics or urgent care centers.

What is worse, some patients haven’t been getting the right care. “Some of the patients with coughs were being treated with codeine-based medicines, which is not appropriate at all for this age group,” Dr. Kressly said.

Even doctors unfazed by patients going elsewhere at night or on weekends are nervous about the entry of the corporate behemoths.

“I can’t advertise on NBC,” said Dr. Shawn Purifoy, who practices family medicine in Malvern, Ark. “CVS can.”

Nurse practitioners allow Dr. Purifoy to offer more same-day appointments; he and two other practices in town take turns covering emergency phone calls at night.

And doctors keep facing new waves of competition. In California, Apple recently decided to open up its own clinics to treat employees. Other companies are offering their workers the option of seeking medical care via their cellphones. Investors are also pouring money into businesses aiming to create new ways of providing primary care by relying more heavily on technology.

Dr. Olden’s office door. In the age of urgent care centers and consolidations, the traditional doctor is being pushed closer to extinction.CreditDavid Ryder for The New York Times

Dr. Mark J. Werner, a consultant for the Chartis Group, which advises medical practices, emphasized that convenience of care didn’t equal quality or, for that matter, less expensive care.

“None of the research has shown any of these approaches to delivering care has meaningfully addressed cost,” Dr. Werner said.

Critics of retail clinics argue that patients are given short shrift by health professionals unfamiliar with their history, and may be given unnecessary prescriptions. But researchers say neither has been proved in studies.

“The quality of care that you see at a retail clinic is equal or superior to what we see in a doctor’s office or emergency department,” said Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, an associate professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School, who has researched the retail clinics. “And while there is a worry that they will prescribe antibiotics to everybody, we see equal rates occurring between the clinics and doctor’s offices.”

Still, while the retail clinics over all charge less, particularly compared with emergency rooms, they may increase overall health care spending. Consumers who not long ago would have taken a cough drop or gargled with saltwater to soothe a sore throat now pop into their nearby retail clinic for a strep test.

Frustration with the nation’s health care system has fueled a lot of the recent partnerships. Giant companies are already signaling a desire to tackle complex care for people with a chronic health condition like diabetes or asthma.

“We’re evolving the retail clinic concept,” said Dr. Troyen A. Brennan, the chief medical officer for CVS. The company hopes its proposed merger with Aetna will allow it to transform its current clinics, where a nurse practitioner might offer a flu shot, into a place where patients can have their conditions monitored. “It requires new and different work by the nurse practitioners,” he said.

Dr. Brennan said CVS was not looking to replace patients’ primary care doctors. “We’re not trying to buy up an entire layer of primary care,” he said.

But people will have the option of using the retail clinic to make sure their hypertension or diabetes is well controlled, with tests and counseling provided as well as medications. The goal is to reduce the cost of care for what would otherwise be very expensive conditions, Dr. Brennan said.

If the company’s merger with Aetna goes through, CVS will initially expand in locations where Aetna has a significant number of customers who could readily go to CVS, Dr. Brennan said.

UnitedHealth has also been aggressively making inroads, adding a large medical practice in December and roughly doubling the number of areas where its OptumCare doctors will be to 75 markets in the United States. It is also experimenting with putting its MedExpress urgent care clinics into Walgreens stores.

Big hospital groups are also eroding primary care practices: They employed 43 percent of the nation’s primary care doctors in 2016, up from 23 percent in 2010. They are also aggressively opening up their own urgent care centers, in part to try to ensure a steady flow of patients to their facilities.

One Medical has centers in eight cities with 400 providers, making it one of the nation’s largest independent groups. 

HCA Healthcare, the for-profit hospital chain, doubled its number of urgent care centers last year to about 100, according to Merchant Medicine. GoHealth Urgent Care has teamed up with major health systems like Northwell Health in New York and Dignity Health in San Francisco, to open up about 80 centers.

“There is huge consolidation in the market right now,” said Dr. Jeffrey Le Benger, the chief executive of Summit Medical Group, a large independent physician group in New Jersey. “Everyone is fighting for the primary care patient.” He, too, has opened up urgent care centers, which he describes as a “loss leader,” unprofitable but critical to managing patients.

Eva Palmer, 22, of Washington, D.C., sought out One Medical, a venture-backed practice that is one of the nation’s largest independent groups, when she couldn’t get in to see a primary care doctor, even when she became ill. After paying the annual fee of about $200, she was able to make an appointment to get treatment for strep throat and pneumonia.

“In 15 minutes, I was able to get the prescriptions I needed — it was awesome,” Ms. Palmer said.

Patients also have the option of getting a virtual consultation at any time.

By using sophisticated computer systems, One Medical, which employs 400 doctors and health staff members in eight major cities, allows its physicians to spend a half-hour with every patient.

Dr. Navya Mysore joined One Medical after working for a large New York health system, where “there was a lot of bureaucracy,” she said. She now has more freedom to practice medicine the way she wants and focus more on preventive health, she said.

By being so readily available, One Medical can reduce visits to an emergency room or an urgent care center, said Dr. Jeff Dobro, the company’s chief medical officer.

As primary care doctors become an “increasingly endangered species, it is very hard to practice like this,” he said.

But more traditional doctors like Dr. Purifoy stress the importance of continuity of care. “It takes a long time to gain the trust of the patient,” he said. He is working with Aledade, another company focused on reinventing primary care, to make his practice more competitive.

One longtime patient, Billy Ray Smith, 70, learned that he needed cardiac bypass surgery even though he had no symptoms. He credits Dr. Purifoy with urging him to get a stress test.

“If he hadn’t insisted,” Mr. Smith said, “it would have been all over for me.” Dr. Purifoy’s nurse routinely checks on him, and if he needs an appointment, he can usually see the doctor that day or the next.

“I trust him 100 percent on what he says and what he does,” Mr. Smith said.

Those relationships take time and follow-up. “It’s not something I can do in a minute,” Dr. Purifoy said. “You’re never going to get that at a MedExpress.”

 

 

WHY HEALTH SYSTEMS SHOULD WORRY ABOUT WALGREENS AND CVS

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/strategy/why-health-systems-should-worry-about-walgreens-and-cvs

 

There’s a building threat from the nation’s two retail drugstore giants to hospitals and health systems as providers move toward value-based care and lower-cost outpatient services.

Even with Amazon threatening to compete with retail drugstore chains CVS Health and Walgreens with its own online pharmacy, these retailers aren’t giving up on brick-and-mortar as a way to attract more patients into their stores.

And that’s bad news for the nation’s hospitals and health systems.

There’s a building threat from the nation’s two retail drugstore giants to hospitals and health systems as medical care providers move away from fee-for-service medicine to value-based care and lower-cost outpatient services.

Walgreens and CVS are looking to healthcare as a way to keep customers coming into their stores, particularly in an era where consumers are fleeing brick-and-mortar to shop online via Amazon.

As front-end retail sales have fallen in recent years, CVS and Walgreens are moving more rapidly into healthcare from simply their historic role of filling prescriptions beyond the pharmacy counter and treating routine maladies with nurse practitioners in their retail centers to more services.

They are partnering more closely with health insurance companies that will work harder to funnel more patients to outpatient healthcare services inside the stores that will make them direct competitors of U.S. hospitals and health systems.

CVS has more than 1,100 retail MinuteClinics compared to 800 five years ago and 400 a decade ago.

CVS was opening 100 clinics per year 10 years ago, and that has slowed because they are now focusing on expanding healthcare services in the clinics as well as their stores generally. The same goes for Walgreens.

Walgreens has increased the services in its retail clinics, advertising the ability of nurse practitioners to conduct routine exams and student physicals and has been aggressively lobbying states across the country to change scope-of-practice laws to allow pharmacists to administer an array of vaccines.

“Why not use those locations as a strategy for healthcare?” Walgreens Chief Medical Officer Dr. Patrick Carroll says of the drugstore chain’s nearly 10,000 locations across the country. “We have the space. We should use it.”

To be sure, Walgreens is looking to provide more physician services like x-rays and procedures by partnering with UnitedHealth Group’s Optum to connect its MedExpress brand urgent care centers to an adjacent Walgreens. Like most retailers, Walgreens’ sales of general merchandise in the front end of the store is falling just as pharmacy sales, personal healthcare, and wellness revenues rise.

In the first such ventures, the Walgreens store and the MedExpress center each have their own entrance with a door inside connecting the urgent care center with the drugstore. It’s designed for a medical provider to guide a patient to either facility depending on their prescription or other needs.

For now, there are 15 locations in six states that have MedExpress urgent care centers connected to Walgreens stores as part of the pilot. The markets include Las Vegas; Dallas; Minneapolis; Omaha, Nebraska; two cities in West Virginia; and Martinsville, Virginia.

“We’re working closely with a number of partners in the healthcare community to bring services closer to our customers,” Carroll said. “With our stores serving as more of a neighborhood health destination, we can best meet the changing needs of our customers, while also complementing our expanded pharmacy services.”

Meanwhile, CVS plans to offer more healthcare services inside its stores after its merger with Aetna closes. CVS executives say they aren’t ruling out developing urgent care centers as well.

CVS’ network of nearly 10,000 pharmacies and over 1,000 retail clinics, and Optum’s growing network of ambulatory facilities like the MedExpress urgent care centers are emerging as a model health insurers want to do business with as fee-for-service medicine gives way to value-based care that keeps patients out of the hospital.

And in CVS’ case, the pharmacy will soon own Aetna, a health plan with more than 20 million members. That combination, which is currently wending its way through the regulatory process, is expected to lead to more narrow network health plans that encourage patients to use providers in the Aetna-CVS network over other health systems’ facilities.

Health systems should be concerned, healthcare analysts say.

“CVS and Aetna, in their own words, are promising to reinvent the front door of American healthcare,” says Kenneth Kaufman, managing director and chair of the consulting firm Kaufman Hall. “That promise should be of serious concern for legacy hospital providers since those providers have occupied that front door for the past 75 years.”

CVS Health President and CEO Larry Merlo is beginning to offer some details to their strategies.

While cautioning that it’s “very early” in the development of new programs the combined company will develop, Merlo has said the larger company plans to first focus on three primary patient populations: those patients with any of five chronic diseases: diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, asthma, and depression.

CVS and Aetna will also focus on “patients undergoing transitions in care,” and a third “broader focus on managing high-risk patients,” Merlo told analysts on the company’s second quarter earnings call in May.

“By extending our new health care model more broadly in the marketplace, patients will benefit from earlier interventions and better connected care leading to improved health outcomes,” Merlo said on September 20 at a CVS Health town hall meeting in Los Angeles.

“Think again about that senior leaving the hospital, knowing that the care plan prescribed by her doctor is being seamlessly coordinated by CVS and her caregiver. By fully integrating Aetna’s medical information and analytics with CVS Health’s pharmacy data and our 10,000 community locations, we can enable more effective treatment of the whole patient,” he says.

 

Caught in the Theranos Wreckage

The high-profile investors, including Ms. DeVos and Mr. Murdoch, collectively invested about $600 million in the company Theranos

Even some of the world’s richest people may get duped, according to newly unsealed documents in a lawsuit filed on behalf of investors in the failing blood-testing company Theranos.

High-profile investors who collectively lost hundreds of millions of dollars included Walmart’s Walton family, the media mogul Rupert Murdoch, as well as Betsy DeVos, the secretary of education and her relatives.

The list of investors, which was first reported by The Wall Street Journal, came to light as part of a class-action lawsuit brought in 2016 by Robert Colman, a retired Silicon Valley investment banker, who claims that Theranos misled investors about its business and technology.

Theranos, founded by Elizabeth Holmes when she was a 19-year-old Stanford University dropout, promised to revolutionize the lab industry using a few drops of blood from a simple finger-prick to look for everything from diabetes to cancer, at a fraction of the cost of a traditional blood test.

The company became a Silicon Valley fairy tale, with investors awarding the privately held company a valuation of around $9 billion. But the story began to unravel in October 2015 after The Wall Street Journal, owned by Mr. Murdoch’s News Corp., began questioning whether the tests worked. Theranos became the subject of federal investigations into its testing and claims of proprietary technology, which were called “nanotainers.” Much of the time the company had to resort to using conventional blood testing methods, unable to get federal approval for any test but one for Herpes.

Theranos and its founder also became embroiled in a series of lawsuits, involving investors as well as one of its key partners, Walgreens, a large drugstore chain, where it offered its tests. The company reached a settlement with Walgreens last August.

In March, the Securities and Exchange Commission charged Ms. Holmes with fraud, accusing her of exaggerating and lying about her technology to attract investors. As part of the S.E.C. action, Ms. Holmes agreed to pay $500,000, give up control of her company, and is barred from serving as an officer or director of any public company for 10 years. She and Theranos did not admit nor deny the allegations.

Theranos still faces the class-action lawsuit, and may still be subject to a criminal investigation by the United States attorney in San Francisco. The company’s future is unclear. The company did not respond to requests for comment.

Theranos had always boasted a star-studded list of investors and directors — its board included the former secretaries of state George P. Shultz and Henry A. Kissinger, two former United States senators, and Gen. Jim Mattis, the current secretary of defense. But while some high-profile investors’ links to Theranos had been previously known, the new documents provide a detailed list of financial amounts.

The Walton family invested about $150 million in 2014 through two separate entities, according to the investor list. Mr. Murdoch put in about $125 million, and the extended family of Ms. DeVos invested about $100 million.

“It’s obvious that they are highly disappointed in them as a company and as an investment,” said Greg McNeilly, the chief operating officer of The Windquest Group, the holding company of Ms. DeVos and her husband. Mr. McNeilly said the $100 million was a joint investment across multiple generations and branches of her family, and described the share held by Ms. DeVos and her husband as “minor.”

Other prominent investors, according to the list, included the Cox family; the Atlanta billionaires who own the media conglomerate Cox Enterprises and who invested $100 million; and a company affiliated with Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim that put in about $30 million. Robert K. Kraft, the owner of the New England Patriots, invested $1 million.

Representatives for Mr. Kraft, the Walton family, Cox Enterprises and News Corp. declined to comment.

 

 

Theranos agrees not to operate labs for two years

http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Theranos-agrees-not-to-operate-labs-for-two-years-11079274.php

The Theranos lab in Newark Calif., seen on April 12, 2015. The company announced a settlement Monday with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that resolves all legal and regulatory proceedings between the federal agency and the embattled Palo Alto blood diagnostics firm. Photo: CARLOS CHAVARRIA, NYT

Theranos has reached a settlement with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that resolves all legal and regulatory proceedings between the federal agency and the embattled Palo Alto blood diagnostics firm, the company announced Monday.

Theranos has agreed to pay a penalty of $30,000 and cannot operate a clinical laboratory for the next two years.

As part of the settlement, the federal agency, which regulates blood testing labs, has withdrawn its revocation of Theranos’ lab operating certification.

Theranos, founded in 2003 by CEO Elizabeth Holmes, had been a high-flying startup that promised to revolutionize blood testing before a Wall Street Journal investigation alleged that the company misled people about the accuracy of its blood testing technology.

It is unclear whether the settlement has any bearing on investigations into the company by the Department of Justice and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The company faces lawsuits from investors and Walgreens, its ex-partner that had been using Theranos blood-testing technology in dozens of stores before terminating the relationship.

Prime Therapeutics, Walgreens to form pharmacy alliance

http://www.startribune.com/prime-therapeutics-walgreens-to-form-pharmacy-alliance/391668561/?utm_campaign=KHN%3A+Daily+Health+Policy+Report&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=33586061&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9d7iwEibFZJhiCy1h9AlZtlpbUsiu3vnoBo60-Y6XqHsa_BjvyfXFttdlW1O7LJuq7BXesmeLO57bnx7tal-1aewPieg&_hsmi=33586061

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Prime Therapeutics deal would integrate pharmacy, Blue plan.

Eagan-based Prime Therapeutics has formed a strategic alliance with drugstore giant Walgreens that would combine the companies’ specialty and mail-order pharmacy businesses.

In addition, health plan subscribers with pharmacy benefits managed by Prime Therapeutics would have preferred access to Walgreens pharmacies as part of the agreement announced Monday.

Financial terms were not disclosed, but Prime officials believe it could spur growth that pushes the firm beyond its position as the country’s fourth-largest pharmaceutical benefits manager (PBM).

Prime Therapeutics is owned by 14 Blue Cross and Blue Shield insurance companies, so the agreement with Walgreens brings together two of the country’s strongest brands in health care, said Jim DuCharme, the chief executive of Prime Therapeutics, in an interview.

“Nobody in the industry has integrated and connected the health plan — the Blue plan — with the retail pharmacy network, with the PBM, for unification of data, technology and overall drug cost reduction,” DuCharme said. “So, that’s probably the most unique feature of this strategic alliance.”

Health insurers hire PBMs to manage the pharmacy benefit portion of health plans. That means everything from negotiating prices with drug companies to structuring formularies that stipulate patient co-payments for different medications.

PBMs assemble a network of retail pharmacies where health plan subscribers can get their prescriptions at the lowest cost. The companies also directly fill prescriptions for patients through mail-order pharmacies as well as specialty pharmacies focused on high-cost and complex medications.

Walgreens terminates partnership with Theranos

http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-management-administration/walgreens-terminates-partnership-with-theranos.html

Walgreens Theranos

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/06/13/481888422/walgreens-cuts-ties-with-blood-test-company-theranos

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