Ex-hospital exec sues DMC for wrongful discharge, retaliation

https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2019/04/01/hospital-exec-sues-dmc-wrongful-discharge-retaliation/3337429002/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Issue:%202019-04-03%20Healthcare%20Dive%20%5Bissue:20208%5D&utm_term=Healthcare%20Dive

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The former top Detroit Medical Center cardiologist is suing the health system, arguing he was forced out of his job for complaining about alleged fraud at the health system, including unnecessary surgeries billed to Medicare and Medicaid. 

The wrongful discharge and retaliation lawsuit was filed in Detroit U.S. District Court by Dr. Ted Schreiber, who was recruited by the DMC in 2004 and developed a trademarked process to speed life-saving treatment for heart attack patients.  He also was the founding president of the new DMC Heart Hospital that opened with fanfare in 2014.

Schreiber’s accusations are “unsubstantiated,” a DMC spokeswoman said Monday night, and the health system continues to have a “culture of integrity.”

Heart Hospital shares facilities with Harper University Hospital that is poised to be terminated from the federal Medicare program in less than two weeks after failing inspections in October and December. Since Harper and Heart Hospital are considered a single facility by the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, both would be barred from the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled if Harper fails to pass an unannounced inspection by the April 15 deadline.

Michigan prohibits hospitals barred from receiving Medicare funding from participating in Medicaid, the health insurance program for mostly low-income people that is jointly funded by the state and federal governments. The two programs combined pay for 85 percent of Harper’s inpatient hospital stays, according to Allan Baumgarten, a Minneapolis-based hospital analyst.

The inspections in October and December were prompted by complaints from Schreiber and three other health system cardiologists who said they were forced from their leadership roles in retaliation for complaining about quality of care issues at the DMC. 

Cardiologists Dr. Mahir Elder and Dr. Amir Kaki filed a similar lawsuit last week in Detroit federal court, saying they were forced from leadership posts for complaining to leaders of the DMC about unnecessary surgeries, dirty surgical instruments and other problems. 

In his lawsuit, Schreiber said he brought concerns about physician competency and unnecessary and/or dangerous procedures to DMC peer review meetings in a bid to ensure that they were investigated. But his concerns were ignored by DMC and its for-profit owner, Tenet Healthcare of Dallas, according to Schreiber’s lawsuit.

“(T)he profitability of physicians was being weighed more heavily by DMC and Tenet executives than the physicians’ ability to provide services to patients within the standard of care,” Schreiber alledged in his lawsuit. “This policy resulted in an increase in unnecessary and/or risky procedures conducted by some physicians leading to bad patient outcomes and even patient deaths.”

The DMC continues to argue that Schreiber and the other cardiologists violated the company’s conduct code. The health system’s top priority is delivering “safe, high quality care to the people of Detroit,” said spokeswoman Tonita Cheatham.

“We have a culture of integrity, which means we don’t look the other way, we don’t condone inappropriate behavior of any kind, and we don’t compromise on our priorities,” Cheatham said in a statement.

“That also means we expect physicians to uphold our Standards of Conduct, including treating fellow physicians, nurses and staff members with respect and dignity.  We welcome the opportunity to present the facts underlying the claims made in the complaint.”

In the lawsuit, Schreiber indicated he also complained to Tenet and DMC leaders that some cardiologists were away from the hospital during times they were required to be on-site as members of Cardio Team One’s 24-hour on-call team. He also said he raised concerns about staffing cuts that resulted in poor nursing care for cardiac patients. 

Tenet Healthcare signed a three-year “corporate integrity agreement” as part of a $513 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice over allegations of a kick-back scheme involving involving four Tenet hospital subsidiaries in the South, according to Schreiber’s suit. The agreement required Tenet and all of its hospitals to self-report all complaints to the federal Justice Department.

“Senior management, including these Defendants, failed to do so and blatantly allowed legal violations to occur in order to generate more income by cutting medically necessary support and allowing unnecessary medical procedures, among other things,” the former cardiologist executive said in his lawsuit.

Schreiber referred a request for comment on the lawsuit to his attorney, David Ottenwess of Detroit.

“Tenet Healthcare, the current for-profit owner of the DMC, has been continually cited by the federal government for placing profits over people,” Ottenwess said. “Tenet has continued that course with its retaliation against Dr. Schreiber and others at the Heart Hospital who had the courage to question Tenet’s practices of profits over safety.”

 

Walgreens settles False Claims suits for $270 million

https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/walgreens-settles-false-claims-suits-270-million?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiT0RrNVpXSmpZV1UzTTJVdyIsInQiOiJNNFh6MElhd0lmVE5Zc09kZTl5d3BPc1h3ZkRpZGNIbWhHSE9RNVp5NkN1MFwvXC9kK3h6WHh5KzRHTWdsQTlWZ203aitRRnhUYWZ5QTVScVZcL01HaTkyUm5LNDRvanVuY0NUdVN4Y0czMzRkMzdNZzMrdVp6WjlmV2N5WHYxMEkrNCJ9

Two cases emerged from whistleblower claims about improper billing related to discounted drug prices and insulin pens.

Pharmacy giant Walgreens will pay nearly $270 million dollars as part of two major settlements, one that alleged the company had improperly billed federal healthcare programs for insulin pens it distributed to beneficiaries who didn’t need them and another that alleged Walgreens failed to disclose and charge lower drug prices offered through a discount program.

Both settlements were approved in mid-January and unsealed Tuesday. Walgreens must pay the United States and state governments a total of $269.2 million. Both cases arose from lawsuits filed by whistleblowers under the False Claims Act. Walgreens did not admit any wrongdoing as part of either settlement.

THE IMPACT

The DOJ said as a result of the conduct alleged in both cases, federal programs were inappropriately taxed. The alleged inappropriate disbursement of insulin resulted in the waste of valuable medication and created the potential for misuse “such as the improper resale of insulin pens on the Internet.” Because the company did properly disclose its discounted drug prices, federal healthcare programs paid out higher reimbursements than were actually warranted.

MORE ON THE CASES

The first settlement resolved allegations that Walgreens improperly billed Medicare and other federal healthcare programs for “hundreds of thousands” of insulin pens dispensed to beneficiaries who didn’t need them. According to a statement from the Department of Justice, it was alleged that Walgreens programmed its electronic pharmacy management system to prevent its pharmacists from dispensing less than a full box of five insulin pens, whether the patient needed that amount or not. It also said Walgreens falsely stated that they had not exceeded limits set on total days of supply in its reimbursement claims. This settlement totaled $209.2 million.

In this case, the DOJ said Walgreens admitted that when a federal health program denied a claim because the reported days of supply for a full carton of five insulin pens exceeded the federal program’s days-of-supply limit, the company dispensed and billed for the full carton and reduced the reported days of supply to conform to the program’s days-of-supply limit. Walgreens also admitted that it “repeatedly” reported days-of-supply data to federal health programs that differed from the days-of-supply calculated according to the standard pharmacy billing formula.

The company will pay $60 million as part of a second settlement to resolve allegations it overbilled Medicaid by failing to disclose and charge Medicaid the lower drug prices that it offered the public through a discount program called the Prescription Savings Club. Legally, the company must seek reimbursement only for the “the lowest of certain drug price points, including the ‘usual and customary price'” namely the price offered through such programs as the PSC. Those prices were not disclosed, causing overpayment from Medicaid to Walgreens, the DOJ said. The agency also said that Walgreens admitted it did not identify its PSC program prices as its U&C prices for the drugs on the PSC program formulary, resulting in overpayments.

ON THE RECORD

“Walgreens is pleased to have resolved these matters with the Department of Justice. The company fully cooperated with the government and has admitted no wrongdoing. Walgreens is a company of pharmacists living and working in the communities we serve, and we have always taken the safety and reliability of the medicines our patients need very seriously. We are resolving these matters because we believe it is in the best interest of our customers, patients and other stakeholders to move forward…In relation to these matters, Walgreens has entered into a Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA) with the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services. The CIA builds upon the company’s already existing comprehensive compliance program,” Walgreens said in a statement.

“In both settlements, Walgreens admitted and accepted responsibility for conduct the Government alleged in its complaints under the False Claims Act,” the DOJ said in a statement.

Pennsylvania health system, CEO will pay $12.5M to resolve billing probe

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/legal-regulatory-issues/pennsylvania-health-system-ceo-will-pay-12-5m-to-resolve-billing-probe.html?origin=cfoe&utm_source=cfoe

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Allentown, Pa.-based Coordinated Health and its founder and CEO Emil DiIorio, MD, have entered into an agreement with the federal government to settle False Claims Act allegations, according to the Department of Justice.

The settlement resolves allegations that Coordinated Health inflated payments from federal payers by unbundling claims for reimbursement for orthopedic surgeries, including many for total joint replacement, from 2007 through mid-2014.

Instead of stopping the illegal unbundling, Dr. DiIorio changed how he wrote operative reports to enable Coordinated Health billers to maximize improperly unbundled reimbursements, according to the Justice Department.

Two outside coding consultants identified the improper unbundling during audits in 2011 and 2013 and told top Coordinated Health executives about the problem. “Motivated by its bottom line, Coordinated Health simply ignored the consultants’ recommendations and continued abusing Modifier 59 to improperly unbundle orthopedic surgery claims until mid-2014,” states a Justice Department press release.

Coordinated Health will pay $11.25 million and Dr. DiIorio will pay $1.25 million to settle the allegations. In addition to the monetary settlement, Coordinated Health entered into a corporate integrity agreement with HHS that will require monitoring of its billing practices for five years.

Regarding the settlement, Coordinated Health released the following statement: “We are pleased to have come to a resolution with the federal government regarding allegations of our past use of a specific Medicare billing modifier, involving a complex Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rule, which does not relate to the quality of patient care. We have already updated our billing practice to resolve the issue in question, and have taken a number of decisive actions to reduce the potential for issues in the future. Our focus has been and always will be providing the best possible patient care in the communities we serve.”

 

CHS subsidiary to pay $262M to settle fraud probe

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/legal-regulatory-issues/chs-unit-to-pay-262m-to-settle-fraud-probe.html

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Franklin, Tenn.-based Community Health Systems subsidiary Health Management Associates has agreed to pay the federal government $262 million to settle fraudulent billing and kickback allegations.

The settlement resolves allegations that HMA billed government payers for inpatient services that should have been billed as less costly observation or outpatient services, paid physicians in exchange for referrals, and submitted claims to Medicare and Medicaid for falsely inflated emergency department facility fee charges.

HMA’s conduct occurred between 2003 and 2012, before CHS acquired HMA. HMA was facing multiple qui tam lawsuits and was the subject of criminal and civil investigations when it was acquired by CHS, and CHS cooperated with the government in its investigation.

“Since acquiring HMA in 2014, it has been our goal to resolve the government’s investigation into all of these allegations which occurred prior to the acquisition and which were already under investigation at the time of the transaction,” CHS said in a press release.

In addition to the $262 million settlement, HMA entered a nonprosecution agreement with the Justice Department. Under the NPA, the government agreed not to bring criminal charges as long as HMA and CHS cooperate with the investigation, report evidence of violations of federal healthcare offenses, and ensure their compliance and ethics programs satisfy the requirements of a corporate integrity agreement between CHS and HHS’ Office of Inspector General.

Under the settlement, Carlisle HMA, the HMA-affiliated entity that formerly operated Carlisle (Pa.) Regional Medical Center, agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud. CHS divested Carlisle Regional in 2017.

“We are pleased to have reached the settlement agreements so we can move forward now without the burden or distraction of ongoing litigation,” said CHS. “As an organization, we are committed to doing our very best to always comply with the law in what is a very complex regulatory environment and to operate our business with integrity, ethical practices and high standards of conduct.”

 

Oxygen equipment provider Lincare pays $5.25M to settle Medicare Advantage fraud suit

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/lincare-oxygen-durable-equipment-medicare-advantage-fraud-settlement?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTjJRMlpERTBObU0yWldOaiIsInQiOiJPMDVjRGNQVzcxMjIzOGt1ZTZva0R2YU1PXC9mYkczVEtYVHNHWmZzSHc1TjU1RGRZZ1o4VVprZStEV3R3VWdXWFwvQlRoYVg4cGpzakZIOFFkMkthRnVPbVwvNEUwQ3ptOVozRGQ0U3IyVDFENENmZTErMjc3TDhRYlwvaUlrT1oxSWgifQ%3D%3D&mrkid=959610

The word fraud framed by other words

One of the country’s largest suppliers of oxygen and respiratory equipment has agreed to pay $5.25 million to settle allegations that it violated anti-kickback laws by reducing copayments for certain Medicare Advantage members.

Lincare has also entered into a corporate integrity agreement with the Office of Inspector General, the Department of Justice announced last week.

The settlement resolves allegations filed by former billing supervisor Brian Thomas, who worked for nearly a decade at the Florida-based company. In his 2015 complaint, which was later joined by federal prosecutors, Thomas claimed Lincare waived copays for Humana’s Medicare Advantage members beginning in December 2011 after the insurer contracted with Apria Healthcare to be an exclusive in-network provider of medical equipment.

In his complaint, Thomas said Lincare matched network benefits by reducing copays from Humana beneficiaries from 30% to 13% to align with copays from Apria. Humana was left paying for a higher charge using government funds.

Lincare was purchased by The Linde Group, a German industrial gas company, for $3.8 billion in 2012. The government alleged Lincare continued the scheme through 2017.

It’s the second major settlement for Lincare, which operates about 1,000 locations across the country. In May, the company paid $875,000 to settle a class action lawsuit from employers who had their information stolen during a data breach.

 

 

 

Healogics to Pay Up to $22.5M in False Claims Settlement

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/finance/healogics-pay-225m-false-claims-settlement

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Whistleblower lawsuits had alleged that the Florida-based wound care specialist knowingly filed bogus claims to Medicare for services that weren’t needed.

Healogics, Inc. will pay up to $22.51 million to settle whistleblower allegations that billed Medicare for medically unnecessary and unreasonable hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the Department of Justice said.

Jacksonville, FL-based Healogics manages nearly 700 hospital-based wound care centers across the nation.

The settlement resolves allegations that from 2010 through 2015, Healogics knowingly submitted false claims to Medicare for medically unnecessary or unreasonable HBO therapy, DOJ said.

Healogics will pay $17.5 million, plus an additional $5 million if certain financial contingencies occur within the next five years, for a total potential payment of up to $22.51 million. The company has also has entered into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement with the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General.

“When greed is the primary factor in performing medically unnecessary health care procedures on Medicare beneficiaries, both patient well-being and taxpayer funds are compromised,” said HHS OIG Special Agent in Charge Shimon R. Richmond.

The settlement came as the result of whistleblower lawsuits filed by a former executive at Healogics, and a separate suit filed by two doctors and a former program director who worked at Healogics-affiliated wound care centers. The four whistleblowers are expected to share $4.2 million of the settlement.

 

 

Broward Health counter-sues former CEO: 5 things to know

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/legal-regulatory-issues/broward-health-counter-sues-former-ceo-5-things-to-know.html

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Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Broward Health’s ex-CEO Pauline Grant sued her former employer in December 2016. The health system fired back in a counter-suit filed Dec. 1, alleging Ms. Grant violated the Anti-Kickback Statute.

Here are five things to know about the litigation.

1. North Broward Hospital District, which does business as Broward Health, claims Ms. Grant violated the system’s code of conduct by serving as secretary of the board of directors of a long-term care provider that had contracts with Broward Health, according to the Sun Sentinel.

2. The health system alleges Ms. Grant’s position on the board violated the terms of a corporate integrity agreement the hospital district entered into with the federal government in 2015. The agreement was put into place after Broward Health paid $69.5 million in September 2015 to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act by holding improper financial relationships with physicians.

3. Broward Health also claims Ms. Grant violated the Anti-Kickback Statute while she was CEO of Broward Health North in Deerfield Beach, Fla., one of the health system’s six hospitals.

4. Broward Health’s board voted 4-1 on Dec. 1, 2016, to fire Ms. Grant. The board voted to remove Ms. Grant from her position after an independent counsel review showed potential violations of the Anti-Kickback Statute. A subsequent independent investigation found Ms. Grant “ran afoul” of federal anti-kickback law when awarding emergency room contracts to orthopedic physicians seeking to participate in Broward Health North’s on-call emergency department rotation.

5. Following her ouster, Ms. Grant sued Broward Health, accusing the system’s general counsel and four board members of violating the Florida open-meetings law to bring about her termination.