Memphis hospital CEOs discuss policies on debt collection after patient lawsuits draw scrutiny

https://www.commercialappeal.com/story/news/2019/12/05/medical-debt-memphis-hospital-patients-sued/2611018001/

Dr. Reginald Coopwood, CEO of Regional One Health, on Feb. 5, 2016.

Representing more than half of the hospitals in Shelby County, the CEOs of four local health care organizations convened at the University of Memphis Tuesday for a panel on “successfully leading change” in the industry.

The gathering took place amid a growing conversation on medical debt — the cause of more than 58 percent of bankruptcies in the United States, according to the American Journal of Public Health. 

Communities across the countries have recently seen individuals and faith-based organizations launch fundraising initiatives to erase millions in medical expenses as part of a burgeoning movement to buy medical debt for the sole purpose of erasing it.

Memphis has also been at the fore of the conversation in recent months, with a pair of investigations by MLK50 and ProPublica revealing an aggressive system of suing patients involving wage garnishments, interest charges and court fees.

That reporting has since prompted a wave of debt reduction and forgiveness for thousands who were being sued by Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare and Southeastern Emergency Physicians, a private equity-owned firm that staffs Baptist Memorial Health Care’s four local emergency rooms.

‘We have to be a profitable business’

At the Tuesday panel, organized by the professional association Mid-South Health Care Executives, the discussion touched on workplace harassment, the impending automation of health care jobs, and diversity.

The CEOs of Methodist Le Bonheur and Baptist Memorial also addressed medical debt as did their fellow panelists.

Dr. Reginald Coopwood, CEO of Regional One Health, the county hospital, said his organization was compelled to reassess its policies as a result of the recent scrutiny surrounding debt collection, though he defended the practice of suing patients in general.

“We send people through processes of collection,” Coopwood said of the public hospital.

“We have a great passion to deliver great care to whoever walks into our door. The flip side of that is … if everybody cannot pay their bills, we can’t buy $100 million record systems and we can’t buy technology that the community as a whole wants,” Coopwood said. “So we have policies to collect whatever is collectible from individuals.”

“That’s what a business needs to do,” he said.

According to General Sessions Court data, analyzed by MLK50 and ProPublica and shared with The Commercial Appeal, those hospitals and a physicians staffing firm, sued more than 2,500 patients in the first six months of the year, between January 1 and June 30:

  • Baptist Memorial Hospital, 486 lawsuits
  • Methodist Le Bonheur, 622 lawsuits
  • Regional One Health, 161 lawsuits
  • Southeastern Emergency Physicians, 1,292 lawsuits

“At the end of the day, we’re businesses, and in order to stay in business, we have to be able — in order to take care of those that are uninsured — we have to be a profitable business,” Coopwood said.

Sally Deitch, CEO of St. Francis Hospitals in Memphis, said the amount of charity care hospitals give back to communities is rarely seen, and, meanwhile, “most of these hospitals are living under their margins of actually being able to say ‘We are financially solid and stable and ready to make investments in new technology.'”

In a Memphis Business Journal review of nonprofit tax filings, Coopwood, Methodist Le Bonheur CEO Michael Ugwueke and Baptist Memorial Health Care CEO Jason Little are listed among the five highest paid nonprofit executives in the metro area, earning between $874,493 and $1,300,954 in 2018. Deitch was appointed to her position in October, after the Memphis Business Journal’s compensation review.

‘No one is perfect’

In the Methodist Le Bonheur system, MLK50 and ProPublica’s investigation found the nonprofit hospital’s practice of taking patients to court, through its in-house collection agency, had entrapped some of its own workers in a cycle of wage garnishments, interest and debt — while they were being paid less than a living wage.

Ugwueke, president of Methodist Le Bonheur’s hospitals in Shelby County, said his organization has gone “above and beyond the issues that were raised.”

The hospital, which is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, announced in July it would cease suing its employees and would raise the hospital network’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Methodist Le Bonheur also said it would institute a revamped financial assistance policy to ensure no one making less than 250 percent of federal poverty guidelines would be sued for debt collection in the future. For the approximately 6,500 patients who were in the process of being sued, the hospital also committed to forgiving or reducing their debts.

“As part of our process, we have made additional changes and accommodations,” Ugwueke said. “No one is perfect. I don’t think it’s anyone’s intention to do anything to harm patients.”

He added that he thinks other institutions have a role to play in serving the needs of low-income and poor communities.

“Memphis is a very challenging community. Health care organizations are not going to be the only ones solving the problems,” he said.

Deitch said no one seeking emergency care would ever be turned away from any hospital. Beyond that, she said she considered hospitals to be participants in helping their communities but not a deciding factor.

“When you start to think through the cost to the system and the burden to the system — at a certain point, it can’t all be the responsibility of a hospital,” she said.

Charity care

Little said he  thinks hospitals should address problems with affordability.

“We still need change in health care because it’s expensive. … Seventy-five percent of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck,” Little said, “and nobody sets money aside and plans to need a transplant. So that’s a challenge for all Americans and all Memphians.”

“And it’s a challenge that I’m really bullish on my colleagues up here continuing to address,” Little said, “because I think we’ve gotten really good at caring for our communities, particularly those in the greatest of need.”

For every dollar spent on expenses, Little said, Baptist Memorial spends 21 cents of it on charity care.

But that financial assistance hasn’t always been accessible to emergency-room patients, MLK50 and ProPublica reported in an investigation into Southeastern Emergency Physicians. The staffing firm contracts with doctors to treat emergency room patients in four of Baptist’s five hospitals in the region.

Southeastern filed nearly 1,300 lawsuits in the first half of 2019, according to MLK50 and ProPublica’s analysis of General Sessions Court data — more lawsuits than Regional One, Baptist Memorial and Methodist Le Bonheur combined.

But by the end of the year, in response to the MLK50 and ProPublica investigation, the firm’s parent company, TeamHealth, said it promote financial assistance program participation and would no longer pursue its active lawsuits — or sue any patients again.

 

 

WHAT TO DO WHEN CONVERTING A HOSPITAL FROM NONPROFIT TO INVESTOR-OWNED

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/strategy/what-do-when-converting-hospital-nonprofit-investor-owned

While perhaps not as controversial as it once was, the ‘conversion’ of a nonprofit hospital to a for-profit venture can raise questions and spark unhelpful rumors.


KEY TAKEAWAYS

There may be an opportunity to highlight increased revenues for the benefit of local government, since investor-owned hospitals pay taxes.

Remember: Every hospital, regardless of its tax status, must bring in more dollars than it spends in order to be financially healthy and reinvest.

In most communities, the conversion of a hospital from a not-for-profit to an investor-owned enterprise no longer stirs the heated debate that it did decades ago. Instead, you’re much more likely today to see not-for-profit and investor-owned hospital organizations working in partnership.

Renowned not-for-profit health systems such as Duke Health and the Cleveland Clinic have formed strong affiliations with investor-owned hospital companies. In these and other partnerships, not-for-profits and investor-owned organizations are working together to strengthen hospitals, invest in communities, and serve patients.

In fact, the issues facing investor-owned hospital systems during a partnership are the same as those faced by not-for-profit health systems during a partnership discussion: Local control and governance, cultural compatibility, charity care support, and commitment to local investment are leading hot buttons for both.

Still, the “conversion” of a not-for-profit to an investor-owned organization can represent a change that can raise questions and ignite unhelpful rumors.

To help you be prepared, start by answering these basic questions: What’s the difference? How are not-for-profit and for-profit (investor-owned) hospitals different from one another?

  • Taxes: First, a (very) broad definition: “Not-for-profit” and “for profit” are tax-related designations. A not-for-profit hospital does not pay certain taxes, including those on property used for care, income, and sales. How- ever, it usually does pay payroll and other federal employee taxes. A for- profit hospital pays property, sales, and income taxes as well as payroll taxes. Not-for-profits sometimes make payments in lieu of taxes to help offset the costs of providing important community services, such as police and fire coverage.
  • Capital: Not-for-profit and investor-owned hospitals are also differentiated by where they get capital to invest in their facilities for infrastructure improvements, new equipment, staff, and the like. Not-for-profit hospitals usually go to the bond market for capital. Investor-owned hospitals go to the public stock market, the bond market, or investment groups for capital.
  • Analysts: Now for a word about financial ratings. Both types of organizations have outsiders judging the hospital’s financial performance. To help investors monitor their portfolios and make buying and selling decisions, not-for-profits are graded by credit rating agencies, such as Moody’s Investors Services and Standard & Poor’s. Publicly traded, investor-owned hospital stocks are watched by analysts and valued daily in stock exchanges.
  • Ownership: Who “owns” the hospital after such a sale is an important question and can reflect a community’s concerns about having a future voice in the care provided at its hospital. The answer can be complicated and inconsistent from hospital to hospital and community to community.

Here’s an overview: Independent, not-for-profit hospitals are, in a sense, owned by the communities they serve. The boards are usually comprised of local leaders and physicians. Excess revenues—profits—are fully reinvested into the community’s care after debt payments, payroll, and other expenses. Hospitals that join a regional or national not-for-profit health system, however, may or may not have a local board with a say in the direction of the facility and may or may not share their profits with the system. (In fact, if your local hospital is in financial trouble, the money flows into your hospital, not out of it!)

Investor-owned hospitals are, as you might guess by the name, owned by investors, who can be private individuals or stockholders. Investors traditionally benefit as the value of the company’s hospitals increases over time, through effective operations and local investments, and as the company overall grows by adding more hospitals.

Adding to this complexity is the trend for hospitals to pursue joint venture partnerships where ownership is shared by two or more organizations, including the “seller.” These partnerships call for strong and trusting relationships by every party. Communications is key to success.

Familiarize yourselves with these terms and issues as you move through a partnership. Be prepared for some myth busting.

That’s where the fundamental structural differences end. The driving forces of both organizations, however, are precisely the same:

  • No matter your tax status, every hospital must take in more dollars than it spends to be financially healthy and to reinvest in the care it provides.
  • Every hospital must offer quality care, provide current medical equipment and facilities, and support a trained staff to attract (and keep) patients  and serve the needs of physicians, payers, and others.

Now, consider some specific questions you may hear related to the structure of a not-for-profit to investor-owned conversion.

WHAT HAPPENS TO THE PROCEEDS OF THE SALE?

When there are funds left over from a sale, they are often referred to as the proceeds. These proceeds exist once the hospital’s debt and any other obligations (e.g., a pension fund) have been paid.

The answer as to what happens to those dollars depends on the ownership structure of the selling organization and the terms of the transaction. Here are a few scenarios:

  • The sale of a stand-alone, not-for-profit community hospital to an investor-owned company may lead to the creation of a community foundation. The creation of the foundation—including its board and mission—may be directed by your state attorney general’s office, and the proceeds from the sale will fund it.
  • When two not-for-profits merge, it is rare that there are proceeds. Instead, the common practice is for all assets from both organizations to combine for the good of the new system.
  • From the sale of a hospital owned by a religious organization, the remaining proceeds will likely return to that order or denomination.
  • When a government-owned hospital is sold, money left over may return to the city’s or county’s coffers, which may deposit it into the government’s general operating fund or create a new organization for meeting the charitable healthcare needs of the community.

WILL CHARITY CARE CONTINUE AT ITS CURRENT LEVEL?

This is really a question of community commitment and may be an indicator of how much the community-based culture is or is not going to change under the new ownership. In most cases, a commitment to either a specific level of charity care or a guarantee to continue the hospital’s existing charitable mission and policy is written into the deal documents. Expect the question and know the answer.

HOW MUCH MONEY IN LOCAL TAXES WILL THE NEW HOSPITAL OWNER PAY?

An investor-owned hospital pays taxes that benefit local government. This question is an opportunity to highlight the added contribution as a distinct benefit of investor-owned partnerships.

In many cases, the fire department, police force, schools, parks, and other community assets will benefit on an annual basis from an investor-owned partner paying state and local property and sales taxes.

One cautionary note: In some cases, new hospital owners may seek appropriate tax incentives when entering a new community and investing in a hospital. Be sure you understand the local government strategic thinking before you answer the tax question.

 

 

 

 

WHY HOSPITALS ARE GETTING INTO THE HOUSING BUSINESS

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/clinical-care/why-hospitals-are-getting-housing-business

Hospitals cannot discharge patients if they have no safe place to go, so patients who are homeless, frail, living alone, or experiencing an unstable housing situation, can occupy hospital beds long after their acute medical problem is resolved.

One patient at Denver Health, the city’s largest safety net hospital, occupied a bed for more than four years—a hospital record of 1,558 days.

Another admitted for a hard-to-treat bacterial infection needed eight weeks of at-home IV antibiotics, but had no home.

A third, with dementia, came to the hospital after being released from the Denver County Jail. His family refused to take him back.

In the first half of this year alone, the hospital treated more than 100 long-term patients. All had a medical issue that led to their initial hospitalization. But none of the patients had a medical reason for remaining in the hospital for most of their stay.

Legally and morally, hospitals cannot discharge patients if they have no safe place to go. So patients who are homeless, frail or live alone, or have unstable housing, can occupy hospital beds for weeks or months—long after their acute medical problem is resolved. For hospitals, it means losing money because a patient lingering in a bed without medical problems doesn’t generate much, if any, income. Meanwhile, acutely ill patients may wait days in the ER to be moved to a floor because a hospital’s beds are full.

“Those people are, for lack of a better term, stranded in our hospital,” said Dr. Sarah Stella, a Denver Health physician.

To address the problem, hospitals from Baltimore to St. Louis to Sacramento, Calif., are exploring ways to help patients find a home. With recent federal policy changes that encourage hospitals to allocate charity dollars for housing, many hospitals realize it’s cheaper to provide a month of housing than to keep patients for a single night.

Hospital executives find the calculus works even if they have to build affordable housing units themselves. It’s why Denver Health is partnering with the Denver Housing Authority to repurpose a mothballed building on the hospital campus into affordable senior housing, including about 15 apartments designated to help homeless patients transition out of the hospital.

“This is an experiment of sorts,” said Peg Burnette, the hospital’s chief financial officer. “We might be able to help better their lives, as well as help the financials of the hospital and help free up capacity for the patients that need to come to see us for acute care.”

SPENDING TO SAVE MONEY

Denver Health once used the shuttered 10-story building for office space but opted to sell it to the housing authority and grant a 99-year lease on the land for a minimal fee.

“It really lowers the construction costs for us,” said Ismael Guerrero, Denver Housing Authority’s executive director. “It was a great opportunity to build additional housing in a location that’s obviously close to the hospital, close to public transit, near the city center.”

Once the renovation is complete in late 2021, the housing group will hire a coordinator to assist tenants with housing-related issues, including helping those in the transitional units find permanent housing. The hospital will provide a case manager to help with their physical and behavioral health needs, preparing them for life on their own. Denver Health expects most patients will be able to move on from the transitional units within 90 days.

The hospital will pay for the housing portion itself. That will still be far cheaper than what the hospital currently spends.

It costs Denver Health $2,700 a night to keep someone in the hospital. Patients who are prime candidates for the transitional units stay on average 73 days, for a total cost to the hospital of nearly $200,000. The hospital estimates it would cost a fraction of that, about $10,000, to house a patient for a year instead.

“The hospital really is like the most expensive form of housing,” Stella said.

GROWING INTEREST

recent report from the Urban Institute found that while most hospital officials are well aware of how poor housing affects a patient’s recovery, they were stymied about how to address the issue.

“It’s on the radar of almost all hospitals,” said Kathryn Reynolds, who co-authored the report. “But it seemed like actually making investments in housing, providing some type of financing or an investment in land or something that has a good amount of value seems to be less widespread.”

The report found housing investment has been more likely among hospitals with their own health plans or other types of arrangements in which they were receiving a fixed amount of money to care for a group of patients. Getting patients into housing could lower their costs and increase their operating margins. Others, particularly religiously affiliated and children’s hospitals, sought housing solutions as part of their charitable mission.

Reynolds said the trend is due in part to the Affordable Care Act, which requires hospitals to perform a community needs assessment to help guide their charitable efforts. That prompted more hospitals to consider the social needs of their patients and pushed housing concerns up the list. Additionally, the Internal Revenue Service clarified in 2015 that hospitals could claim housing investments as charitable spending required under their tax-free status. And provisions included in the 2017 tax cut bill provided significant tax savings for investors in newly designated opportunity zones, increasing their interest in affordable housing projects.

Some hospitals, she said, may use their cash reserves to invest in housing projects that generate a lower return than other investment options because it furthers their mission, not just their profits.

In other cases, hospital systems play a facilitator role—using their access to cheap credit or serving as an anchor tenant in a larger development—to help get a project off the ground.

“Housing is not their business,” Guerrero said. “It’s not an easy space to get into if you don’t have the experience, if you don’t have a real estate development team in-house to understand how to put these deals together.”

CUTTING COSTS

In the southwestern corner of Colorado, Centura Health’s Mercy Regional Medical Center has partnered with Housing Solutions for the Southwest to prioritize housing vouchers for frequent users of the emergency room.

Under a program funded by the Catholic Health Initiatives, Mercy hired a social worker and a case manager to review records of frequent emergency room patients. They quickly realized how big an issue housing was for those patients. Many had diabetes and depended on insulin—which needs refrigeration. Kidney failure was one of the most costly diagnoses for the hospital.

Once patients received housing vouchers and found stable housing, though, costs began to drop.

“We now knew where they were. We knew that they had a safe place to live,” said Elsa Inman, program coordinator at Mercy Regional. “We knew they would be more effective in managing their chronic conditions.”

The patients with stable housing were more likely to make it to their primary care and specialist appointments, more likely to stay on top of medications and keep their chronic conditions in check.

The combination of intensive case management and patient engagement helped to halve ER visits for the first 146 patients in the program, saving nearly $495,000 in Medicaid spending in less than three years.

“Hospitals are businesses and nonprofits are businesses,” said Brigid Korce, program development director for Housing Solutions. “They are bottom-line, dollars-and-cents people.”

Inman acknowledged that the hospital might have missed out on some revenue by reducing ER use by these patients. Hospitals are still largely paid by the number of patients they treat and the number of services they provide.

But most of those patients were covered by Medicaid, so reimbursements were low anyway. And the move freed up more ER beds for patients with more critical needs.

“We want to be prepared for life-threatening conditions,” Inman said. “If you’ve got most of your beds taken up by someone who can be receiving patient care outside in the community, then that’s the right thing to do.”

That was less of an issue for the inpatients at Denver Health. Because hospitals are generally paid a fixed amount for a given diagnosis, the longer a patient stays in the hospital, the more money the hospital loses.

“They’ve basically exhausted their benefit under any plan because they don’t meet medical necessity anymore,” Burnette said. “If they had a home, they would go home. But they don’t, so they stay in the hospital.”

 

 

 

Charity Care Spending By Hospitals Plunges

Charity Care Spending By Hospitals Plunges

Image result for Charity Care Spending By Hospitals Plunges

California hospitals are providing significantly less free and discounted care to low-income patients since the Affordable Care Act took effect.

As a proportion of their operating expenses, the state’s general acute-care hospitals spent less than half on these patients in 2017 than they did in 2013, according to data the hospitals reported to California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development.

The biggest decline in charity care spending occurred from 2013 to 2015, when it dropped from just over 2% to just under 1%. The spending has continued to decline, though less dramatically, since then.

The decline was true of for-profit hospitals, so-called nonprofit hospitals and those designated as city, county, district or state hospitals.

Health experts attribute the drop in charity care spending largely to the implementation of the federal Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare. The law expanded insurance coverage to millions of Californians, starting in 2014, and hospitals are now treating far fewer uninsured patients who cannot pay for the care they receive.

With fewer uninsured patients, fewer patients seek financial assistance through the charity care programs, according to the California Hospital Association.

Cori Racela, deputy director at the Western Center on Law & Poverty, countered that many people still need financial assistance because — even with insurance — they struggle to pay their premiums, copays and deductibles.

“The need for charity care has changed,” she said, “but it still exists.”

The data on charity care comes from most of the state’s general acute-care hospitals but does not include Kaiser Permanente hospitals, which are not required by the state to report their charity care totals. (Kaiser Health News, which produces California Healthline, has no affiliation with Kaiser Permanente.)

For 2017, California Healthline used data from 177 nonprofit hospitals, 80 for-profit hospitals and 54 city, county, district or state hospitals. The breakdown was similar for the other years, with slight fluctuations.

Nonprofit hospitals, whose charity care spending dropped from 2.02% of operating expenses to 0.91% over the five-year period, are required by state and federal law to provide “community benefits” in exchange for their tax-exempt status.

They can meet that requirement beyond providing free and discounted care in a variety of ways: They can offer community public health programs, write off uncollected patient debt and claim the difference between what it costs to provide care and the amount that they are reimbursed by government insurance programs.

Nonprofit “hospitals get tax-exempt status, but they don’t get it for free,” said Ge Bai, associate professor of accounting and health policy at Johns Hopkins University. Charity care “is part of the implicit contract between hospital and taxpayers.”

Bai sees the reduced spending on charity care as part of a trend of nonprofit hospitals acting more like their for-profit counterparts.

Many nonprofit hospitals “no longer consider charity care their primary mission,” she said. “They are making more and more money but they are dropping their charity care.”

The state and federal governments set no minimum requirements for charity spending by hospitals, although the California Attorney General has created standards for a few nonprofit hospitals that have changed ownership in recent years.

Jan Emerson-Shea, a spokeswoman for the California Hospital Association, said hospitals are giving back to their communities in ways beyond charity care.

“You see charity care declining, but Medi-Cal losses are increasing,” Emerson-Shea said. She pointed to the growing shortfalls many hospitals report from caring for more patients covered by the public insurance program. “Every Medi-Cal patient we treat we lose money on.”

Medi-Cal, the state’s Medicaid program for low-income residents, increased its rolls by 5.6 million — or about 70% — from 2013 to 2017.

Racela, of the Western Center on Law & Poverty, would like to see changes in California’s charity care rules to address high out-of-pocket costs.

And she wants hospitals to abide by the state law that requires them to inform patients that they may be eligible for charity care based on their income.

“There is still a big unmet need for charity care across the state,” Racela said.

 

 

 

Grassley Renews Probe of Nonprofit Hospitals

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/grassley-renews-probe-nonprofit-hospitals

The Iowa Republican has asked the IRS for data on how many of the nation’s approximately 3,000 tax-exempt hospitals are in compliance with charity care requirements.


KEY TAKEAWAYS

Grassley asked for information about whether tax-exempt hospitals are meeting the statutory requirements laid out in section 501 of the Internal Revenue Code.

The lawmaker is renewing his probe of tax-exempt hospitals after hearing reports that ‘at least some of these tax-exempt hospitals have cut charity care, despite increased revenue.’

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley has renewed efforts to ensure that nonprofit hospitals are earning their tax-exempt status by providing enough services for low-income people.

In a letter to Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Charles Rettig, the Iowa Republican asked for data on how many hospitals are in compliance with the requirements for tax-exempt status and the status of IRS examinations of those not in compliance.

“Making sure that tax-exempt hospitals abide by their community benefit standards is a very important issue for me,” Grassley said in his letter.

“As chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I oversaw an investigation into the billing practices of the Mosaic Life Care hospital. That investigation resulted in debt relief of almost $17 million for thousands of low-income patients.  This issue is still just as important to me now that I am chairman of the Senate Finance Committee,” Grassley wrote.


The Mosaic Life inquiry examined the billing and debt collection practices at the health system after news reports indicated it had sued low-income patients who should have qualified for charity care.

Grassley told Rettig that he was renewing his probe of tax-exempt hospitals after hearing “reports” that “at least some of these tax-exempt hospitals have cut charity care, despite increased revenue, calling into question their compliance with the standards set by Congress.”

He asked Rettig for information about whether tax-exempt hospitals are meeting the statutory requirements laid out in section 501 of the Internal Revenue Code, and he cited in his letter an article in Politico that suggested nonprofit hospitals were profiting from the Affordable Care Act while simultaneously cutting their charity care.

In February 2018, Grassley sent a letter to the IRS to inquire about how the agency reviews nonprofit hospital compliance.

Acting Commissioner David J. Kautter responded in April 2018 that the IRS reviews the status of about 1,000 U.S. tax-exempt hospitals each year by reviewing Forms 990, hospital websites, and other information in order to identify the hospitals with the highest likelihood of noncompliance.

Kautter said the IRS assigns either a compliance check or examination to those hospitals that appear to be most at risk of noncompliance.

Melinda Hatton, general counsel for the American Hospital Association, said her organization was confident that nonprofit hospitals are meeting their mission.

“In 2015, an AHA analysis of Schedule H filings reported that 13.3% of tax-exempt hospitals and health systems total expenses were devoted to community benefits programs, and that half of that spending was attributable to expenditures for providing financial assistance to needy patients and absorbing losses from Medicaid and other means-tested government program underpayments,” she said.

Hatton said an analysis by Ernst & Young for the AHA found that hospitals’ and health systems’ community benefit activities outweigh the value of their federal tax exemption by a factor of 11 to one. “According to the report, non-profit hospitals in 2013 were exempt from an estimated $6 billion in federal taxes and provided an estimated $67.4 billion in community benefits,” Hatton said.

“Making sure that tax-exempt hospitals abide by their community benefit standards is a very important issue for me.”