Americans’ medical debt tops $140B, study finds

What Are The Best Ways to Clear Medical Debt?

Collection agencies held $140 billion in unpaid medical debt in 2020, according to a study published July 20 in JAMA.

Researchers examined a nationally representative panel of consumer credit reports between January 2009 and June 2020. Below are four other notable findings from their report.

  1. An estimated 17.8 percent of Americans owed medical debt in June 2020. The average amount owed was $429.
  2. Over the time period studied, the amount of medical debt became progressively more concentrated in states that don’t participate in the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion program.
  3. Between 2013 and 2020, states that expanded Medicaid in 2014 experienced a decline in the average flow of medical debt that was 34 percentage points greater than the average medical debt flow in states that didn’t expand Medicaid.
  4. In the states that expanded Medicaid, the gap in the average medical debt flow between the lowest and highest ZIP code income levels decreased by $145, while the gap increased by $218 in states that did not expand Medicaid.

Relying on one nonprofit to relieve the debts owed to another

https://mailchi.mp/bade80e9bbb7/the-weekly-gist-june-18-2021?e=d1e747d2d8

American Hospital Association stays mum on debt collection practices |  BenefitsPRO
Ballad Health, a not-for-profit health system operating in Virginia and Tennessee, announced this week that it had reached an agreement with RIP Medical Debt, a charity that uses donations to relieve debt created by healthcare bills, to pay off $287M of outstanding debt owed by its patients.

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, the purchase will eliminate the debt of 82,000 low-income patients, many of whom qualified for Ballad’s charity care program but did not take advantage of it. The terms of the purchase were not disclosed, but RIP Medical Debt, which says it has relieved over $4.5B in medical debt nationally, typically pays between one and 1.25 percent of the owed amount for recent debt, and as little as 0.03 percent for older debt. That’s similar to what typical debt-purchasing businesses pay. But unlike those businesses, however, RIP Medical Debt says its debt eradication service has no tax consequences for recipients, effectively wiping away large sums that patients might have owed for years.

Since its creation as the result of a 2018 merger, Ballad has faced a mandate to increase the financial aid it provides to low-income patients, but has still come under criticism for aggressive collection practices, including the use of lawsuits against patients who owe the system. The deal with RIP Medical Debt is intended to reduce the amount of debt outstanding—as Ballad CEO Alan Levine told the Journal, “We’re wiping the slate clean.”

As a recent analysis by Axios and Johns Hopkins University showed, most nonprofit hospital systems have tried to reduce aggressive collections in recent years, with just 10 hospitals accounting for 97 percent of court actions against patients between 2018 and 2020. While it’s shocking to hear of a private charity having to step in to relieve patients of crippling medical debt in our nation’s $3.6T healthcare industry, absent larger structural solutions to the broken reimbursement system, it’s at least heartening to know that such services are available. But it’s a Band-Aid solution—more radical treatment remains undelivered.

Memphis hospital CEOs discuss policies on debt collection after patient lawsuits draw scrutiny

https://www.commercialappeal.com/story/news/2019/12/05/medical-debt-memphis-hospital-patients-sued/2611018001/

Dr. Reginald Coopwood, CEO of Regional One Health, on Feb. 5, 2016.

Representing more than half of the hospitals in Shelby County, the CEOs of four local health care organizations convened at the University of Memphis Tuesday for a panel on “successfully leading change” in the industry.

The gathering took place amid a growing conversation on medical debt — the cause of more than 58 percent of bankruptcies in the United States, according to the American Journal of Public Health. 

Communities across the countries have recently seen individuals and faith-based organizations launch fundraising initiatives to erase millions in medical expenses as part of a burgeoning movement to buy medical debt for the sole purpose of erasing it.

Memphis has also been at the fore of the conversation in recent months, with a pair of investigations by MLK50 and ProPublica revealing an aggressive system of suing patients involving wage garnishments, interest charges and court fees.

That reporting has since prompted a wave of debt reduction and forgiveness for thousands who were being sued by Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare and Southeastern Emergency Physicians, a private equity-owned firm that staffs Baptist Memorial Health Care’s four local emergency rooms.

‘We have to be a profitable business’

At the Tuesday panel, organized by the professional association Mid-South Health Care Executives, the discussion touched on workplace harassment, the impending automation of health care jobs, and diversity.

The CEOs of Methodist Le Bonheur and Baptist Memorial also addressed medical debt as did their fellow panelists.

Dr. Reginald Coopwood, CEO of Regional One Health, the county hospital, said his organization was compelled to reassess its policies as a result of the recent scrutiny surrounding debt collection, though he defended the practice of suing patients in general.

“We send people through processes of collection,” Coopwood said of the public hospital.

“We have a great passion to deliver great care to whoever walks into our door. The flip side of that is … if everybody cannot pay their bills, we can’t buy $100 million record systems and we can’t buy technology that the community as a whole wants,” Coopwood said. “So we have policies to collect whatever is collectible from individuals.”

“That’s what a business needs to do,” he said.

According to General Sessions Court data, analyzed by MLK50 and ProPublica and shared with The Commercial Appeal, those hospitals and a physicians staffing firm, sued more than 2,500 patients in the first six months of the year, between January 1 and June 30:

  • Baptist Memorial Hospital, 486 lawsuits
  • Methodist Le Bonheur, 622 lawsuits
  • Regional One Health, 161 lawsuits
  • Southeastern Emergency Physicians, 1,292 lawsuits

“At the end of the day, we’re businesses, and in order to stay in business, we have to be able — in order to take care of those that are uninsured — we have to be a profitable business,” Coopwood said.

Sally Deitch, CEO of St. Francis Hospitals in Memphis, said the amount of charity care hospitals give back to communities is rarely seen, and, meanwhile, “most of these hospitals are living under their margins of actually being able to say ‘We are financially solid and stable and ready to make investments in new technology.'”

In a Memphis Business Journal review of nonprofit tax filings, Coopwood, Methodist Le Bonheur CEO Michael Ugwueke and Baptist Memorial Health Care CEO Jason Little are listed among the five highest paid nonprofit executives in the metro area, earning between $874,493 and $1,300,954 in 2018. Deitch was appointed to her position in October, after the Memphis Business Journal’s compensation review.

‘No one is perfect’

In the Methodist Le Bonheur system, MLK50 and ProPublica’s investigation found the nonprofit hospital’s practice of taking patients to court, through its in-house collection agency, had entrapped some of its own workers in a cycle of wage garnishments, interest and debt — while they were being paid less than a living wage.

Ugwueke, president of Methodist Le Bonheur’s hospitals in Shelby County, said his organization has gone “above and beyond the issues that were raised.”

The hospital, which is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, announced in July it would cease suing its employees and would raise the hospital network’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Methodist Le Bonheur also said it would institute a revamped financial assistance policy to ensure no one making less than 250 percent of federal poverty guidelines would be sued for debt collection in the future. For the approximately 6,500 patients who were in the process of being sued, the hospital also committed to forgiving or reducing their debts.

“As part of our process, we have made additional changes and accommodations,” Ugwueke said. “No one is perfect. I don’t think it’s anyone’s intention to do anything to harm patients.”

He added that he thinks other institutions have a role to play in serving the needs of low-income and poor communities.

“Memphis is a very challenging community. Health care organizations are not going to be the only ones solving the problems,” he said.

Deitch said no one seeking emergency care would ever be turned away from any hospital. Beyond that, she said she considered hospitals to be participants in helping their communities but not a deciding factor.

“When you start to think through the cost to the system and the burden to the system — at a certain point, it can’t all be the responsibility of a hospital,” she said.

Charity care

Little said he  thinks hospitals should address problems with affordability.

“We still need change in health care because it’s expensive. … Seventy-five percent of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck,” Little said, “and nobody sets money aside and plans to need a transplant. So that’s a challenge for all Americans and all Memphians.”

“And it’s a challenge that I’m really bullish on my colleagues up here continuing to address,” Little said, “because I think we’ve gotten really good at caring for our communities, particularly those in the greatest of need.”

For every dollar spent on expenses, Little said, Baptist Memorial spends 21 cents of it on charity care.

But that financial assistance hasn’t always been accessible to emergency-room patients, MLK50 and ProPublica reported in an investigation into Southeastern Emergency Physicians. The staffing firm contracts with doctors to treat emergency room patients in four of Baptist’s five hospitals in the region.

Southeastern filed nearly 1,300 lawsuits in the first half of 2019, according to MLK50 and ProPublica’s analysis of General Sessions Court data — more lawsuits than Regional One, Baptist Memorial and Methodist Le Bonheur combined.

But by the end of the year, in response to the MLK50 and ProPublica investigation, the firm’s parent company, TeamHealth, said it promote financial assistance program participation and would no longer pursue its active lawsuits — or sue any patients again.