Aetna, Anthem, Health Care Service Corporation, PNC Bank and IBM announce blockchain network

https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/aetna-anthem-health-care-service-corporation-pnc-bank-and-ibm-announce-blockchain-network?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiT0RJNU16UTNOakl4WlRFNCIsInQiOiJ1WHRTRHREbE5rM1hkZmc1QnRcL3JCSjdxMWdtXC9weGE1OE4yT0tMZ2d0eGVCYnlXbkVDSmVtU09UTzZDaUVSTmE2aVRpT1YzSklCVmVsZ3VaMWVyMDlNa1Z2b25DbXZ2QnpxSUpySWluXC8zSDRoTmkya2JCMU53b1h5YkRQUDlNcyJ9

Network will eventually be open to new members for secure digital sharing of healthcare information.

Aetna, Anthem, IBM, Health Care Service Corporation and PNC Bank have partnered to create a blockchain technology network aimed at improving transparency and interoperability in the healthcare industry. 

The groups intend to use blockchain for more efficient claims and payment processing. Blockchain enables the secure exchange of information. It will also benefit more accurate provider directories.

WHY THIS MATTERS

Collaboration is key in the industry as a more cost-effective alternative to merging to create more competitive and efficient systems.

The current network is expected to add additional health organizations in the coming months, including providers, startups, and technology companies.

Initial members include three of the nation’s largest insurers, Anthem; HCSC,a customer-owned health insurer that includes Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans; Aetna, which is now part of the CVS Health business; IBM, which is a leading blockchain provider; and PNC Bank, which is a member of The PNC Financial Services Group.

Blockchain technology gives health systems an edge because it ideally creates faster, more efficient and secure claims and payment processing.

Insurers are mandated to maintain accurate provider directories, a time consuming and often manual practice involving numerous emails, phone calls and even fax exchanges.

For providers, a new technology that can actually reduce time spent in administrative clicks on a computer is a boon.

THE TREND

Despite major initiatives to digitize healthcare information, improvements in transparency and interoperability are still needed for that data to be shared.

Blockchain is designed to fill that role, reducing administrative errors and costs and ultimately enhancing patient care. The network also enables the companies to build and deploy new solutions.

Walmart last year filed a patent to use blockchain for medical records. A pharmaceutical industry consortium called the MediLedger Project, launched in 2017, is using blockchain to track pills across the supply chain, according to Fortune.

ON THE RECORD

“Through the application of blockchain technology, we’ll work to improve data accuracy for providers, regulators, and other stakeholders, and give our members more control over their own data,” said Claus Jensen, chief technology officer at Aetna

Rajeev Ronanki, Anthem chief digital officer Rajeev Ronanki: “Timely access to medical information has been a stumbling block for creating a seamless consumer experience. With a trusted foundation based on transparency and cryptography, we will provide a faster, safer and more secure way to exchange medical information to transform the  consumer healthcare experience.”

What’s more, blockchain will enable large networks to exchange health data in a transparent and controlled way, according to Lori Steele, general manager for Healthcare and Life Sciences for IBM.

“Using this technology, we can remove friction, duplication, and administrative costs that continue to plague the industry,” added Chris Ward, head of product, PNC Treasury Management.

 

Talk over Coffee into a Data Revolution for northern Nevada’s largest hospital system

http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-management-administration/steal-this-idea-how-renown-ceo-dr-tony-slonim-turned-a-talk-over-coffee-into-a-data-revolution-for-northern-nevada-s-largest-hospital-system.html

Image result for starbucks coffee for meetings

In May 2016, Tony Slonim, MD, DrPH, met fellow New Jersey native Joe Grzymski, PhD, at a Starbucks for coffee. Dr. Slonim, CEO of Reno, Nev.-based Renown Health, said he expected to trade stories about their home state, but they soon found their professional interests as compatible as their personal ones.

“Like all good things, it started at Starbucks over a coffee on a Saturday morning,” Dr. Slonim said, “As we let our minds expand and started thinking about complementary ways we could collaborate, this idea came up.”

This idea is a partnership between Renown and the Desert Research Institute, where Dr. Grzymski is senior director of applied research.

The duo began to think of ways they could combine the clinical data 946-bed Renown had on hand with the DRI’s environmental data to better understand the ways outside factors affect health outcomes in their community.

But the idea didn’t stop there. The pair also recognized that social determinants play an equally influential role in shaping a person’s health, so they made sure to include social data from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development in their new project, which did not yet have a name, but more importantly had a purpose.

“If we believe in population health, and the vision for population health, we’ve got to do a better job of understanding the health and the wellbeing of the people we’re serving,” said Dr. Slonim. “As an organization that’s got a large market share, it’s incumbent upon me as the CEO to think about how to use the most efficient resources for the most benefit for people that need it.”

At first, the collaboration was seen as a data-sharing project that would connect skilled researchers and analysts at the DRI with a wealth of combined information that had been inaccessible to a single provider in the past. However, it was only once Dr. Slonim and Dr. Grzymski took their idea to the 2016 BIO International Convention in San Francisco that they were able to find a third partner to provide them with yet another data set that would help them fully see the big picture of a person’s health.

Representatives from retail genetics firm 23andMe approached Dr. Grzymski following his talk at BIO. The company offered to provide genetic testing and sequencing for the project. Dr. Grzymski jumped at the opportunity, which would enrich the already robust data collection he and Dr. Slonim had begun to compile.

With genetic information as a fourth pillar of their potential data set, Renown and the DRI founded the Renown Institute for Health Innovation. The IHI’s most important initiative would go on to be named the Healthy Nevada Project.

At a September 2016 press conference, Dr. Slonim and other IHI leaders teamed up with Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval to announce that the first 5,000 Reno residents who signed up to submit genetic samples would receive free access to the test results. Dr. Slonim believes offering this access to community members is what encouraged 5,000 people to sign up in only the first 24 hours of the enrollment period. With such an enthusiastic response, the leaders at the IHI decided to open up 5,000 more slots, which took one more day to fill. In only 48 hours, the Healthy Nevada Project had succeeded in enrolling 10,000 local residents to submit samples for genetic testing.

The project was off and running — quickly. And Dr. Slonim’s work was only just beginning.

Once 23andMe completed genetic sequencing of all 10,000 study participants in December, the Healthy Nevada Project still faced a looming question: What to do with all the data they’d collected?

“One-hundred more people per 100,000 die of cardiovascular disease in northern Nevada than national estimates. Our cancer rates are significantly higher and nobody knows why. So [we’re] trying to understand what the backdrop and the context is,” Dr, Slonim said. “Is it the mines that we have here? Is it the weather patterns that change because we’re in a valley? Our air pollution is higher, our particulate matter is higher — is that what causes lung cancer? We’re trying to figure this out, but you can’t do anything without data, so we started there.”

Dr. Slonim understands epidemiologists and analysts will have to spend many careful hours with the data to come to any concrete conclusions, but he believes the Healthy Nevada Project represents an essential first step for the future of the healthcare industry. If he and his colleagues could begin to harness the power of data in EHRs, then he sees a world of untapped potential that can help his community improve their health while also improving Renown’s organizational efficiency.

“This is the ultimate in strategic planning. If I figure out that our community is more at risk for cardiovascular disease 10 years from now, I can be thoughtful about how I go about recruiting cardiologists. If I know that the population is growing in pediatrics, I can start a program for pediatric residents at the medical school and grow my own pediatricians,” Dr. Slonim says. “The horizon for planning can be kept in view because we’re learning about our population’s health and disease. The second reason why I did this is because it’s the best way to engage consumers in their own healthcare to modify their behaviors.”

Dr. Slonim’s advice to hospital leaders looking to improve their capacity for innovative data concepts is simple: Take the first step. For the most part, the benefits of the Healthy Nevada project still lay ahead, as it has been only 15 months since that coffee meeting, but the game-changing potential cannot be understated. Dr. Slonim is confident that putting in the work to collect and analyze this comprehensive data will revolutionize the way Renown cares for its patients, and he believes other providers can follow suit.

“If you’re a large contributor to your market in healthcare with full range of integrated services across the continuum, get the environmental data. Get partnerships with the social data,” Dr. Slonim says. “Figure out how you can exercise your clinical EMRs and the great repository of data that are in there and put them in a big data warehouse and figure out how to analyze them. We’re not using predictive analytics in healthcare the way that other industries are, and we need to be better at that.”

Independence Is Not a Strategy for Health Systems

http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/leadership/independence-not-strategy-health-systems?spMailingID=11725844&spUserID=MTY3ODg4NTg1MzQ4S0&spJobID=1221639238&spReportId=MTIyMTYzOTIzOAS2#

Image result for john gribbin centrastate

There are ways to keep going it alone in the face of massive consolidation, says one health system’s CEO. It’s not a strategy, but a means to end, he says.

Afraid your hospital or health system can’t compete because you lack size and scale?

A merger might help, but it’s not the only possible answer to your problems. Freehold, NJ-based CentraState Healthcare System’s top leader is certain it’s not the best solution for his organization.

Consolidation continues to upend the acute and post-acute healthcare industry. In fact, in a recent HealthLeaders Media survey, some 87% of respondents said that their organization is exploring potential deals, completing deals already under way, or both.

But CentraState isn’t among them, says John Gribbin, its president and CEO.

On a continuum basis, CentraState is already diversified. That’s one of the potential selling points of an M&A deal.

Anchored by the 248-bed CentraState Medical Center in Freehold, NJ, the 2,300-employee organization also contains three senior care facilities—one assisted living, one skilled-nursing facility, and a continuing care retirement community.

It can be argued that CentraState may not possess the scale to compete with multifacility, multistate large health systems that can take advantage of a hub-and-spoke strategy for referrals. Nor may it be able to afford expensive interconnected IT systems.

But there ways other than mergers to achieve scale and collaboration, says Gribbin.

Means to an End

Gribbin insists that he and CentraState’s board, which supports and encourages independence, are not dogmatic about it.

“Independence is not a strategy,” he says. “It’s a means to an end. The moment that ceases to be worthwhile is the moment we’ll consider another way to achieve our mission.”

Change is part of that strategy, he says, adding that healthcare in 2017 needs to be far more collaborative, not only with patients and family, but with other healthcare organizations. That’s a big difference from previous generations.

“Our real strategy is scale and relevancy,” he says.

And there are ways to create scale short of taking on all the legacy costs and “baggage,” as Gribbin calls it, inherent in any merger.

“There’s a lot of costs involved in merging… and while mergers work in some instances, they don’t work in all, and in many communities, they are increasing costs to the consumer,” he says.

In addition to the commonly stated goals of improving the community’s health and wellness, patient costs are extremely important in fulfilling CentraState’s mission, Gribbin argues.

Many mergers involve replacing hospitals and adding patient towers and high-cost equipment. That adds to their cost structure means they have to extract higher pricing, says Gribben.

“That’s the vicious circle you find yourself in. I prefer to create scale in a different manner.”

Focus on the Mission

Gribbin, who has led CentraState for 17 years, prefers to solve that challenge in part through a strong network of physicians unburdened by excessive administrative overhead.

He says the health system has to increasingly take on value-based contracting and financial risk. To be successful under such value-based reimbursement, partnerships with physicians are increasingly important, as is a redefinition of the relationship with the patient.

“We used to look at our relationship with the patient as a typical hospital stay,” says Gribbin. “What we’re preaching now is that hospital stay is a temporary interruption in our relationship. What happens before or after defines the relationship’s success.”

With its physician alliance and clinically integrated network in place, CentraState, unlike many hospitals, has been able to avoid, in large part, expensive physician practice acquisitions that can be a financial challenge.

“I’ve done it in the past, and may do it again, but we’ve tried to avoid it,” he says. Instead, contracts define the relationships and incentives.

As an example of those relationships, CentraState partners with a major patient-centered medical home primary care practice on four performance and three utilization measures.

As a result of the shared savings generated in the first year, which came largely from hospital-based savings, the physicians in that group referred 59% of their patients to CentraState.

This year they’ve referred 71% of their patients to CentraState because of its low costs, which help drive financial reward for both parties under the contract.

“On one hand, we’re keeping people appropriately out of acute care, but on the other hand, they’re sending [more] people here. So we’re experiencing higher but more appropriate volume. In this scenario, everyone wins,” Gribbin says.

A New Deal with Physicians

In order to avoid the need to acquire physician practices, Gribbin says it helps to have a suite of services to offer them as a starting point.

“Most don’t want to sell their practice, but they feel like they have to, he says. “If you give them the opportunity to stay independent, they’ll take it.”

Helping them with access to better revenue cycle management, malpractice insurance, and risk management, and helping them create the ability to enter into risk-based contracts is another big help with defining a new relationship based on shared goals with physicians that ultimately benefit the patient, he says.

Physicians can establish a relationship with CentraState through its independent practice association, or a physician hospital association, and avoid surrendering their autonomy, he says.

“The physicians got paid better, the payer saved money even including the bonus, the hospital won because it’s high value care, and the patient’s winning too,” he says. “It’s a microcosm of what we’re trying to accomplish.”

As a small organization, both Gribbin and the board worry about being frozen out of narrow networks. Much of the energy they’ve expended in being a low-cost organization is wasted, he says, if they can’t get the big payers to include them in contracting.

“As long as the market isn’t rigged against us, we’re OK, because we’re a high-value organization.”

Humility is the New Smart: Are You Ready?

https://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2017/06/humility_is_the_new_smart_are.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LeadingBlog+%28Leading+Blog%29

Humility is the New Smart

SMART used to be a quantity game. “I know more than you. I get more things right.” But Ed Hess and Katherine Ludwig say that in the new Smart Machine Age, that’s losing game. The new smart is about quality. Specifically, the quality of your thinking, your listening, and your relating and collaborative skills.

Are you ready?

The Smart Machine Age (SMA) will revolutionize how most of us live and work. In Humility is the New Smart, the authors state that “smart technologies will become ubiquitous, invading and changing many aspects of our professional and personal lives and in many ways challenging our fundamental beliefs about success, opportunity, and the American Dream.” This means that the “number and types of available jobs and required skills will turn our lives and our children’s lives upside down.”

New skills will be needed. Uniquely human skills. Those skills, while uniquely human, are not what we are typically trained to do and require a deal of messy personal development. We will need to become better thinkers, listeners, relators, and collaborators, while working to overcome our culture of obsessive individualism in order to thrive in the SMA. Humility is the mindset that will make all of this possible.

Most of today’s adults have had no formal training in how to think, how to listen, how to learn and experiment through inquiry, how to emotionally engage, how to manage emotions, how to collaborate, or how to embrace mistakes as learning opportunities.

In short, say the authors, we need to acquire and continually develop four fundamental NewSmart behaviors:

Quieting Ego

Quieting Ego has always been the challenge for us humans. As they observe, “Even if we don’t consider ourselves part of the ‘big me’ cultural phenomenon, for many of us to feel good about ourselves we have to constantly be ‘right,’ self-enhance, self-promote, and conceal our weaknesses, all of which drive ego defensiveness and failure intolerance that impedes higher-level thinking and relating.” This tendency negatively affects our behavior, thinking, and ability to relate to and engage with others.

Managing Self—Thinking and Emotions

We need to get above ourselves to see ourselves impartially. We all struggle “to self-regulate our basic humanity—our biases, fears, insecurities, and natural fight-flee-or-freeze response to stress and anxiety.” We need to be willing to treat all of our “beliefs (not values) as hypotheses subject to stress tests and modification by better data.”

Negative emotions cause narrow-mindedness. Positive emotions on the other hand, have been scientifically linked to “broader attention, open-mindedness, deeper focus, and more flexible thinking, all of which underlie creativity and innovative thinking.”

Reflective Listening

Because we are limited by our own thinking, we need to listen to others to “open our minds and, push past our biases and mental models, and mitigate self-absorption in order to collaborate and build better relationships.” The problem is “we’re just too wired to confirm what we already believe, and we feel too comfortable having a cohesive simple story of how our world works.” Listening to others helps to quiet our ego.

Otherness

To create these new behaviors and mindsets, it should become obvious that we need to enlist the help of others. “We can’t think, innovate, or relate at our best alone.” As Barbara Fredrickson observed, “nobody reaches his or her full potential in isolation.” Jane Dutton out it this way: “It seems to be another fact that no man can come to know himself except as the outcome of disclosing himself to another.”

The NewSmart Organization

Optimal human performance in the SMA will require an emphasis on the emotional aspects of critical thinking, creativity, innovation and engaging with others. “The work environment must be designed to reduce fears, insecurities, and other negative emotions.

To do this it means “providing people a feeling of being respected, held in positive regard, and listened to. It means creating opportunities for people to connect and build trust. “It means allocating time and designing work environments that bring people together to relate about nonwork matters.” Finally, it means getting to know employees and helping them to get the “right training or opportunities to develop and provide feedback.”

The NewSmart organization needs to be a safe place to learn. “Feeling safe means that you feel that your boss your employer, and your colleagues will do you no harm as you try to learn.”

The New Smart