Debating the best way to Chase Commercial Market Share

https://mailchi.mp/e60a8f8b8fee/the-weekly-gist-september-23-2022?e=d1e747d2d8

Cross-subsidy economics are increasingly challenged for America’s hospitals. Aging Baby Boomers are moving from commercial insurance to Medicare, decreasing the share of patients with lucrative private coverage, and insurers are increasingly reticent to provide the rate increases providers need to make up for the worsening mix.

At a recent executive retreat, one health system debated the best strategies to increase their capture of commercial volume. Most of the conversation focused on traditional market-based tactics to increase access and awareness in fast-growing, higher income areas of their service region.

For instance, the system’s chief marketing officer was pushing to increase advertising in the rapidly expanding suburbs, and advocated building ambulatory surgery centers in a wealthy area of town with a boom of new home construction. 
 
The chief strategy officer shared a different perspective, supporting an employer-focused strategy. His logic: “In most businesses, the CEO and the janitor have the same benefit plans. If we only focus on the wealthy parts of town, we’re missing a big portion of the workers with good insurance.” He advocated for a new round of direct-to-employer contracting outreach, hoping to steer workers to high-value primary and specialty care solutions.

In reality, any system looking to move commercial share will need to do both—but even the best playbook for building commercial volume is unlikely to close the growing cross-subsidy gap. To maintain profitability in the long term, health systems must reduce costs for managing Medicare patients by delivering lower-cost care in lower-cost settings, with lower-cost staff.    

The Trend of Health System Mergers Continues

While healthcare is delivered locally, the business of healthcare
is regional, and the regions are only getting bigger.
Hospital
and health system mergers alike have continued to shift from
local to regional, and the recently announced merger between Advocate Aurora
Health and Atrium Health clearly highlights that the regions are only getting
bigger.


Advocate Aurora, with a presence in Illinois and Wisconsin, and Atrium Health,
with a presence in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, will
combine to create a $27 billion health system that will span six states and make it
one of the leading healthcare delivery systems in the country. The combined
organization, which will transition to a new brand, Advocate Health, will operate
67 hospitals and over 1,000 sites of care, employ nearly 150,000 teammates, and
serve 5.5 million patients. Together, Advocate Health will become the 6th largest
system in the country behind Kaiser Permanente, HCA Healthcare, CommonSpirit
Health, Ascension, and Providence.


We have seen a number of large health systems come together recently,
including Intermountain Healthcare + SCL Health to create a $15 billion revenue
system, Spectrum Health + Beaumont ($14 billion), NorthShore University Health
System + Edward-Elmhurst Healthcare
($5 billion), LifePoint Health + Kindred
Healthcare
($14 billion), and Jefferson Health + Einstein Healthcare Network ($8
billion).


The exact reasoning for each merger differs slightly, but one of the common
threads across all is scale.
But not scale in the traditional M&A sense. Rather,
scale in covered lives; scale in physician infrastructure and alignment; scale in
clinical and operational capabilities; scale in technology, innovation, and
partnerships with non-traditional players; scale for capital access; and scale for
insurance risk to compete in a value-based world. It is no longer the strong
acquiring the weak. Rather, strong players are coming together to gain scale to
face the headwinds in a unified manner.

For Advocate Aurora and Atrium, coming together is about leveraging their combined clinical excellence,
advancing data analytics capabilities and digital consumer infrastructure, improving affordability, driving health equity, creating a next-generation workforce, research, and environmental sustainability. Together, they have pledged $2 billion to disrupt the root causes of health inequities across underserved communities and create more than 20,000 new jobs.


Both Advocate Aurora and Atrium are no strangers to mergers. Advocate and Aurora came together in 2018, and prior to that Advocate was intending to merge with NorthShore before being blocked due to anti-trust. Atrium has grown over the years, merging with systems such as Navicent Health in Georgia in 2018, Wake Forest Baptist Health in North Carolina 2020, and Floyd Health System in Georgia in 2021. In the newly proposed merger, Advocate Aurora and Atrium are coming together via a joint operating arrangement where each entity will be responsible for their own liabilities and maintain ownership of their respective assets but operate together under the new parent entity and board. This may allow the combined entity more flexibility in local decision-making. The current CEOs, Jim Skogsbergh and Eugene Woods will serve as co-CEOs for the first 18 months, at which point Skogsbergh will retire, and Woods will take over as the sole CEO.


Mergers can come in various shapes and structures, but the driving forces behind consolidation are not unique. With the need to compete in value-based care, adequately manage risk, gain scale across covered lives, physicians, and points of access, successfully deliver affordable high-quality care, and the need to deal with the vertical and horizontal consolidation of the large-scale payers, the markets that health systems operate in must be large enough to be effective and relevant. We fully expect to see more of these larger scale health system mergers in the near term.


The physical delivery of healthcare is local, but, again, the business of healthcare is not; it is regional, and the regions are only getting bigger.

Payer contracts, physician pay still anchored in fee-for-service

The healthcare industry has made some strides in the “journey to value” across the last decade, but in reality, most health systems and physician groups are still very much entrenched in fee-for-service incentives.

While many health plans report that significant portions of their contract dollars are tied to cost and quality performance, what plans refer to as “value” isn’t necessarily “risk-based.” 

The left-hand side of the graphic below shows that, although a majority of payer contracts now include some link to quality or cost, over two-thirds of those lack any real downside risk for providers. 

Data on the right show a similar parallel in physician compensation. While the majority of physician groups have some quality incentives in their compensation models, less than a tenth of individual physician compensation is actually tied to quality performance. 

Though myriad stakeholders, from the federal government to individual health systems and physician groups, have collectively invested billions of dollars in migrating to value-based payment over the last decade, we are still far from seeing true, performance-based incentives translate into transformation up and down the healthcare value chain.  

CMS releases 2023 Medicare Advantage and Part D Advance Notice

https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/cms-releases-2023-medicare-advantage-and-part-d-advance-notice

The agency’s end goal for Medicare Advantage is to match CMS’ vision for its programs as a whole, with an emphasis on health equity.

On Wednesday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released proposed payment policy changes for Medicare Advantage and Part D drug programs in 2023 that are meant to create more choices and provide affordable options for consumers. 

The Calendar Year 2023 Advance Notice for Medicare Advantage and Part D plans is open to public comment for 30 days. This year, CMS is soliciting input through a health equity lens on the approach to some future potential changes.

The agency’s end goal for Medicare Advantage is to match CMS’ vision for its programs as a whole, which Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure said is “to advance health equity; drive comprehensive, person-centered care; and promote affordability and the sustainability of the Medicare program.”

CMS is proposing an effective growth rate of 4.75% and an overall expected average change in revenue of 7.98%, following a 4.08% revenue increase planned for 2022.

WHAT’S THE IMPACT?

CMS is requesting input on a potential change to the MA and Part D Star Ratings that would take into account how well each plan advances health equity. 

The agency is also requesting comment on including a quality measure in MA and Part D Star Ratings that would assess how often plans are screening for common health-related social needs, such as food insecurity, housing insecurity and transportation problems.

The Health Equity Index has been tasked with creating more transparency on how MA plans care for disadvantaged beneficiaries. 

Additionally, CMS is requesting input on considerations for assessing the impact of using sub-state geographic levels of rate setting for enrollees with end-stage renal disease, particularly input regarding the impact of MA payment on care provided to rural and urban underserved populations and how such payment changes may impact health equity.

Other areas in which CMS is soliciting input include a variety of payment updates, a new measure concept to assess whether and how MA plans are transforming care by engaging in value-based models with providers’ and updates to risk-adjustment models to continue to pay appropriately for people enrolled in MA and Part D plans.

Public comments on the Advance Notice must be submitted by March 4. The Medicare Advantage and Part D payment policies for 2023 will be finalized in the 2023 Rate Announcement, which will be published no later than April 4.

REACTION

The proposed rule has already elicited reaction from various organizations, including Better Medicare Alliance.

“As we continue to review the Advance Notice in further detail, we appreciate that CMS has offered a thoughtful proposal that will help ensure stability for the millions of diverse seniors and individuals with disabilities who count on Medicare Advantage,” Mary Beth Donahue, president and CEO of the Better Medicare Alliance, said, adding that the proposal furthers the shared goal of improving health equity.

Medicare Advantage has proven its worth for seniors and taxpayers – providing lower costs, meaningful benefits that address social determinants of health, better outcomes and greater efficiencies for the Medicare dollar,” she said. “A stable rate for 2023 ensures this work can continue. On behalf of our 170 Ally organizations and over 600,000 beneficiary advocates, we applaud CMS for putting seniors first by issuing an Advance Notice that protects coverage choices, advances health equity and preserves affordability for beneficiaries.”

AHIP also responded, with President and CEO Matt Eyles pointing out that for 2022 the average Medicare Advantage monthly premium dropped to $19, down more than 10% since 2021.

“We agree that MA plans play an essential role in improving health equity and addressing the social determinants of health that impact millions of seniors and people with disabilities,” he said. “We support CMS soliciting input on ways to advance these important goals.

“Medicare Advantage enjoys strong bipartisan support because it provides America’s seniors and people with disabilities with access to affordable, high-quality healthcare services,” said Eyles. “We will continue to review the 2023 rate notice and look forward to providing constructive feedback to CMS during the comment period.”

THE LARGER TREND

CMS’ Advance Notice follows a recent congressional letter in which 346 bipartisan members of Congress declared support for Medicare Advantage and urged the agency “to provide a stable rate and policy environment” for the program in 2023.

A December 2021 Morning Consult poll showed that 94% of Medicare Advantage beneficiaries are satisfied with their coverage, while 93% believe that protecting MA should be a priority of the Biden administration.

One Medical buying Medicare-focused Iora in $2.1B deal

Announcing Iora | One Medical

Dive Brief:

  • Google-backed One Medical is acquiring Medicare-focused primary healthcare chain Iora Health for $2.1 billion in an all-stock trade deal, the companies announced Monday.
  • The buy will give One Medical presence in 28 markets, covering about 40% of the U.S. population and is expected to generate annual revenue at $350 million by 2025. The deal will add about $700 billion in total addressable market, according to an investor presentation.
  • Under the terms of the deal, which is expected to close in the late third quarter or fourth quarter of this year, Iora stockholders will own about 27% of the combined company. One person from Iora will join One Medical’s board and Iora co-founder and CEO Rushika Fernandopulle will become One Medical’s chief innovation officer.

Dive Insight:

The acquisition aligns two key players in part of the value-based care movement that eschews traditional payer-provider arrangements in favor of a concierge membership model. Iora’s concentration in the Medicare population and related participation in CMS’ direct contracting model could be key reasons for coming under One Medical’s sights.

Jefferies analysts said they viewed the transaction as positive, particularly considering both companies’ tech and data capabilities. “Given tech orientation and emphasis on outcomes, we expect substantial derivative value from combining data and developing better treatment programs with superior outcomes across [longitudinal] care. We see this as a clear clinical and applied advantage,” they wrote.

Both companies base their business on value-based models, which some in the industry worry have suffered during the COVID-19 pandemic as cash-strapped providers avoid the risk of models not based on fee-for-service. The Biden administration’s director at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation said recently the movement is at “a critical juncture” and that more mandatory models are likely forthcoming.

One Medical has faced challenges as of late, after a first quarter that saw losses double what was expected and a controversy over COVID-19 vaccine distribution that sparked a congressional investigation. The company, however, has forged ahead in deals, including a new partnership with Baylor Scott & White.

And on the Q1 call with investors, executives highlighted a membership increase of 31% year over year.

One Medical, founded in 2007, lead the pack of recent healthcare IPOs, going public in January 2020.

The company touts its direct-to-consumer model buts also contracts directly with employers and partners with several health systems. CFO Bjorn Thaler told Healthcare Dive at the time of the IPO its pitch to investors focused on highlighting a differentiated model.

“[W]e provide the member with a very, very valuable service. They don’t have to wait 29 days to get care. They can get care oftentimes in an instant, digitally,” he said.

Boston-based Iora, which was founded in 2011, has raised nearly $350 million over seven funding rounds, according to Crunchbase. It has contracts with major payers including UnitedHealthcare, Cigna and Humana.

The deal extends One Medical into full-risk Medicare reimbursement. Iora began the direct contracting model in April across all its markets. The program ties reimbursement to spending and quality for all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries across a geographic region.

About 60% of Iora’s members are in the fast-growing Medicare Advantage program, which has now reached about 40% of the Medicare population.

Iora had expected revenue this year to reach nearly $300 million and as of the first quarter had 38,000 members, compared to nearly 600,000 members at One Medical, according to the investor presentation.

One Medical stock was trending slightly down in early morning trading Monday.

CMS: Many value-based payment models under review after several already delayed, withdrawn

Many of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s value-based care payment models are undergoing a review, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

The statement to Fierce Healthcare comes after CMS quietly updated and delayed several payment models, including pulling a controversial model that ties payments to geographic health outcomes.

“CMS remains steadfast in its commitment to transforming the healthcare system into one that rewards value and care coordination,” the agency said. “The CMS Innovation Center and its alternative payment models help execute that commitment.”

The agency added it hopes to design models that support the adoption of value-based care.

“Many of the CMS Innovation Center’s models are currently under review, and we look forward to providing updates when available,” CMS said.

CMS did not return a request for comment on how many models are under review or which ones are being scrutinized.

The statement comes after CMS has quietly updated the webpages for two payment models to note major changes. The agency made an update to the webpage for the Geographic Direct Contracting Model that said it was currently under review.

A request for applications for the model was posted Jan. 1, and the first performance period was expected to start in 2022 and run through 2024.

The model was intended to improve quality and lower costs for Medicare beneficiaries across a region, and providers in that region can enter into value-based payment arrangements.

Providers can build integrated relationships and invest in population health to better coordinate care, the agency said when the model was released last December.

But the model has gotten pushback from some provider groups. The National Association of Accountable Care Organizations has criticized the model, saying it could confuse patients who may not know whether they are participating in a direct contracting entity.

CMS also quietly pushed back the first performance period for the Kidney Care Choices model, which aims to improve the quality of dialysis care.

The model had an implementation period for 2020 that enabled participants to create the necessary infrastructure for the model, which aims to bundle care from treatment of chronic kidney disease all the way through kidney transplantation and post-transplant care.

Starting Jan. 1, 2021, providers were supposed to start taking on financial accountability including capitated payments.

But CMS posted an update on the webpage for the model, saying the start of the financial performance period will now be Jan. 1, 2022. The agency did not give a reason for the delay.

CMS’ review comes on the heels of a separate analysis conducted under the Trump administration on the value generated by the payment models. The analysis found bundled payment models that gave providers an amount of money for an entire episode of care had mixed results, while global budget models, which give providers a fixed amount for the total number of services given over a certain period of time, were given a more positive review.

It remains unclear whether that analysis is playing any role into the review undertaken by the Biden administration.

The home-based care space heats up

https://mailchi.mp/05e4ff455445/the-weekly-gist-february-26-2021?e=d1e747d2d8

Home Healthcare Market Size, Growth Report, 2020-2027

This week Brookdale Senior Living, the nation’s largest operator of senior housing, with 726 communities across 43 states and annual revenues of about $3B, announced the sale of 80 percent of its hospice and home-based care division to hospital operator HCA Healthcare for $400M. The transaction gives HCA control of Brookdale’s 57 home health agencies, 22 hospice agencies, and 84 outpatient therapy locations across a 26-state footprint, marking its entry into new lines of business, and allowing it to expand revenue streams by continuing to treat patients post-discharge, in home-based settings.

Like other senior living providers, Brookdale has struggled economically during the COVID pandemic; its home and hospice care division, which serves 17,000 patients, saw revenue drop more than 16 percent last year. HCA, meanwhile, has recovered quickly from the COVID downturn, and has signaled its intention to focus on continued growth by acquisition across 2021.
 
In separate news, Optum, the services division of insurance giant UnitedHealth Group, was reported to have struck a deal to acquire Landmark Health, a fast-growing home care company whose services are aimed at Medicare Advantage-enrolled, frail elderly patients. Landmark, founded in 2014, also participates in Medicare’s Direct Contracting program.

The transaction is reportedly valued at $3.5B, although neither party would confirm or comment on the deal. The acquisition would greatly expand Optum’s home-based care delivery services, which today include physician home visits through its HouseCalls program, and remote monitoring through its Vivify Health unit.

The Brookdale and Landmark deals, along with earlier acquisitions by Humana and others, indicate that the home-based care space is heating up significantly, reflecting a broader shift in the nexus of care to patients’ homes—a growing preference among consumers spooked by the COVID pandemic. 

Along with telemedicine, home-based care may represent a new front in the tug-of-war between providers and payers for the loyalty of increasingly empowered healthcare consumers.

Pandemic propels health systems to mull insurer acquisitions, partnerships

4 Reasons Strategic Partnerships are Important for Business - Glympse

Nearly a year after the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the U.S., some of the nation’s largest health systems made a case for the need to accelerate toward value-based arrangements and potentially acquiring or partnering with health plans to become an integrated system.

Amid new records for deaths and cases from the novel coronavirus, executives gathered virtually for J.P. Morgan’s 39th annual healthcare conference, which typically draws prominent healthcare leaders to San Francisco at the start of each year.

The pandemic has been a heavily discussed topic during the digital gathering. One theme has been health systems either acknowledging they are on the hunt for health insurer acquisitions and partnerships or advocating for such arrangements as result of the challenges.

Anu Singh, managing director and the leader of the mergers, acquisitions and partnerships practice at consultancy Kaufman Hall, said it’s a natural migration for health systems, though it does come with some risk.

“If you want to move into the realm of being a population health manager, and take greater responsibility for your patient bases, you’re going to have to be thinking about maintaining their health,” Singh said. “And that’s typically something that, at least traditionally and historically, has been driven a little bit more by the health plan.”

For Utah’s Intermountain Healthcare, the lessons of the pandemic are clear: The industry needs to move away from a system that rewards volume. Intermountain is a fully integrated system that manages both providers and an insurance unit.

“It is becoming increasingly apparent that systems that are well integrated, especially systems that understand how to take risks, have prospered in the face of the terrible burden, caring for people in the midst of the first pandemic in 100 years,” Intermountain CEO Marc Harrison said Monday.

From his vantage point, Harrison said it has been interesting to watch the consternation around telehealth visits.

“Lots of folks who are really still caught in the volume-based system are actively switching patients back from tele- or distance to in-person visits so they can maximize revenue,” he said. “I understand that. But that’s a really great example of poorly aligned incentives.”

Intermountain has managed to stay in the black as many other systems have struggled financially as a result of the pandemic driving down patient volumes. It reported net income of $167 million through the first nine months of 2020, compared with $919 million the year prior.

Another integrated system, Baylor Scott and White Health, the largest nonprofit system in Texas, said such diversification has helped buoy its finances as hospital and clinic operations bottomed out in the spring due to the virus.

Baylor Scott and White illustrated this point by showing how operating income for its clinical segment took a nosedive in the spring while operating income for its health plan remained relatively steady.

The theme of integrated health systems also seemed to be on the minds of investors. CommonSpirit Health executives were asked during their presentation if buying or creating a health plan was on their radar as the system has a sizable footprint of 140 hospitals across the country.

“I think this is a interesting question, one that of course we’ve discussed many times strategically,” CFO Daniel Morissette said, noting the system does have a number of regional plans. “At this time, we have no plan of having a national CommonSpirit branded plan.” However, Morissette said the system would consider a partnership opportunity.

On the other hand, Midwest-based Advocate Aurora Health said it is actively on the hunt for a potential insurer deal as part of its long-term strategy.

“We do believe that having health plan capability, not necessarily having our own, but partnering for health plan capability, is going to be critical to our success, and we are taking steps to do that,” CEO Jim Skogsbergh said during the virtual conference.

Kaufman Hall said in its latest report that it expects more payer-provider partnerships as a result of the pandemic. “Limitations on fee-for-service payment structures exposed by the pandemic may increase the number of payer-provider partnerships around new payment and care delivery models,” according to the report.

Singh of Kaufman Hall said it’s not surprising that some may lean more toward a partnership due to the risks of starting a new venture, especially an insurance unit that can have “catastrophic loss”. Systems with less experience of moving toward implementing value-based initiatives may be more vulnerable to such risk.

It’s why he thinks partnerships may be a good fit, at least at first. Payers and providers can work together to improve the health of certain populations and then share in the cost savings.